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Recently my IBS C has started to get worse and worse, so I've just embarked on the FODMAP diet as recommended by a friend, who is a doctor. Not really sure where to start, I bought the book 'IBS - Free at Last' by Patsy Catsos as it had good reviews on Amazon. So, I went out shopping this weekend and bought all the 'allowed foods' in the book, only to find that the book is out of date and a lot of foods that she deems 'allowed' have now been ruled out. If anyone wants a massive bag of mushrooms and a cauliflower I have plenty going spare....The book is American and all food portions/recipes are measured out in cups, which is confusing to me. Trying to find a standard conversion table on the net has proved very difficult; in the past I've always gone on the knowledge that one cup is equivalent to 8 fluid ounces, but found many websites said that the measurement in ounces differs depending on the type of ingredient, e.g; whether you're measuring dry goods, or fruit, or liquid etc. So, I've just sort of been guessing.Anyway, I've been doing the diet for 4 days now, and I'm not expecting to see an improvement just yet. But, I'm really struggling with the portion sizes. I am a very big eater, plus I run on a regular basis so I'm constantly hungry, and four days into this diet I'm STARVING! The book I'm following sets a meal-plan to help you get the gist of the diet for the first two weeks, but some of the meals and snacks are leaving me with a rumble in my tummy! For example, a suggestion for a mid-morning snack is some cherry tomatoes and a low-fat mozzarella stick - I would usually eat a flapjack, a banana/raisins and 4 cheesy oatcakes!! She pads out a lot of the meals and snacks with nuts, and I'm terribly allergic to nuts so this is a no-go for me, but I'm not sure what I can replace this food group with without eating too many danger foods in one meal.Today, I've already eaten:Breakfast:1 cup cheerios, handful of blueberries & lacto-free milk1 rice cake with a little bit of butterMid-morning snack:2 rice cakes1 gherkin5 cherry tomatoes1/2 oz brieA small bit of ham1 celery stick1 boiled eggLunch:Baked potato with tuna, cucumber and mayoNot even sure if I should be eating this much, but my usual diet consists of lots of oats, dried fruit and pulses which I've had to eliminate. I don't find that raw fruit and veg fills me up as a snack so I'm having to eat loads of it for it to even touch the sides!Would be interested to know how other people have coped on this diet. Being a very thin person, I've never had to go on a diet before of any kind, so this is a real test of my willpower.
 

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A cup of fluid and a couple of dry goods can be a bit different, and if you are used to measuring by weight that can make it harder.fluids are usually the easiest to adjust (just calculate the milimeters) I would calculate the amount of calories in your usual diet and then see how that compares to the fodmap menu plans and adjust the portion sizes up to get the number of calories a day you need. Protein and fat foods tend to be more filling, so you might add more of the meat or add some safe oil to the veggies rather than try to fill up on something that won't satisfy your hunger.http://www.jsward.com/cooking/conversion.shtml seems to be a good chart for converting to metric from cups. I know it would be nice if 1 dry cup of something was a simple conversion, but it isn't.
 

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Eggs! Lots and lots of eggs! Watch out with the yolks, don't go crazy and eat all the yolks because that's a TON of cholesterol, but I'd never get enough protein if it weren't for eggs. Plus they're cheap and versatile.Updates to the food lists is very frustrating, and I find that there's a level of personal tolerance to be figured out as well. The website for Patsy's book, http://www.ibsfree.net/, has updates listed. Search "book update" and they'll all come up by food group.Also, personally I cannot handle lactose-free milk and I'm of the opinion that lactose-free dairy items should not be eaten on the elimination phase. Try switching to rice milk for a few weeks and see how that goes. Also, I see you listed ham. I have found almost all commercial ham contains honey, which is a danger food. Artisan-style cured meats usually only contain salt and pork so I recommend going for the high-end meats and not cheap ham.I was pretty hungry for the first week until I started getting a feel for what i can and can't eat. I say ignore the portion size suggestions if you're a really active guy who needs to eat a lot - unless the portion size specified is for a fruit or vegetable. Those are restricted because they may contain a small amount of FODMAPs, so shouldn't be eaten in large quantities.My last piece of advice is use a food tracking website like livestrong.com to monitor your calorie intake and your nutrient levels. IBS is very fiber-sensitive and I try to get only the recommended amount but no more than that. Also, check out my blog for recipes, menu ideas, and package food reviews: Happy Tummy Happy Life
 

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Hi guys, thanks for the replies.I've started only restricting the allowed 'dangerous' food like milk and fruit. Everything else I've just been scoffing! I've also been doing some experimenting with gluten-free foods. I've tried gluten-free bread and I've got to say I was not impressed. I've seen that spelt grain is allowed, so if anyone knows of a good spelt bread recipe for a breadmaker I'd be glad of any recommendations. I also tried buckwheat pasta last night and was absolutely astounded to find that after leaving it to boil for a couple of minutes (I left the kitchen for approx 3 mins!) it had dissolved and turned into a mess of mush! Not impressed at all.I did check the ham I bought as I'm well aware of additives in food as it is - as a rule I only ever buy organic meat and the guy on the deli counter advised me it was just plain ham.Does anyone know if oats are allowed? The book specifies oatmeal, but in the UK oats and oatmeal are two different things and I'm not sure which product the Americanisation refers to.Do you know what the worst part is? I've been asked to bake a cake for my friend's wedding in the summer, and since I've never done anything as big or important as a wedding cake before I'm baking about a cake a week to perfect my recipe as practice, but I can't eat any of it!! Torture! Still, my friends and family seem to be enjoying it :)
 

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I know it sounds horrendous, and it kind of is I'm not going to lie, but going all-in with FODMAP elimination is the only way to really know if that's the root of your problem. If it doesn't work well after a few weeks then you know that your issue isn't from malabsorption of certain sugars, it must be something else. I recommend seeing a nutritionist or dietician if you aren't extremely knowledgable about food and nutrition because it is very difficult to eat a proper balanced diet while eliminating FODMAP consumption. In the US we have a pretty decent selection of gluten-free foods. Udi's is a brand here that makes good gluten-free bread, and the best pastas I've found are made of rice and quinoa. Buckwheat or soba noodles should be steeped in hot water with a lid over top, not boiled hard, or else they will dissolve on you like they did. Rice noodles from the Asian market are also great and there's a huge variety. Some Asian cuisines also use noodles made of seaweed which are OK.Is oatmeal more like a coarse flour in the UK? In the US oatmeal is a term applied to flat rolled oats that retain their oval shape but cook quickly. We call steel-cut oats Irish Oatmeal in the US sometimes, or just steel cut oats, and those are more like a whole oat kernel that's been diced up a bit and they take more like 45 minutes to cook. But oh so delicious! Either way I think all oat products are probably fine for FODMAPs.Your baking dilemma does sound tragic! I recently made a pan of rice crispy treats (not sure if you have those across the pond- they're a puffed rice cereal stuck together into a bar form with melted marshmallows) thinking I had thoroughly checked all the ingredients, but after I made them and ate one I felt sick within 3 hours, which is my typical reaction to fructose. Sure enough, looked at the labels again and the marshmallows had high fructose corn syrup. Luckily I hate a bunch of housemates so they got eaten anyways, but I had to look at them every day until they were gone and wish I could have one...
 

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Hi Vickym85 To make the low fodmap diet as easy as possible, concentrate on exchanging items in your previous diet for low fodmap alternatives.For example Doves Farm offer a range of pasta made from rice. There are loads of other low fodmap goodies and recipes on their website.They supply my white [low cereal fibre] spelt flour for breadmaking. [via sainsburys-£1.99 kg]I use this in my breadmaker, on the low gluten setting. The recipe is on the DF website.Spelt flour is very low in gluten, so does not require knocking back and a second proving like normal bread. It is just mixed, allowed to rise, then baked. Takes 2 hr in my bread machine.Good luck.edit added, link to previous fodmap thread discussing bread,http://www.ibsgroup.org/forums/topic/146021-fodmap-diet/btw, spelt is great in cakes and biscuits.
 

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Hi guys, thanks for the replies.I've started only restricting the allowed 'dangerous' food like milk and fruit. Everything else I've just been scoffing! I've also been doing some experimenting with gluten-free foods. I've tried gluten-free bread and I've got to say I was not impressed. I've seen that spelt grain is allowed, so if anyone knows of a good spelt bread recipe for a breadmaker I'd be glad of any recommendations. I also tried buckwheat pasta last night and was absolutely astounded to find that after leaving it to boil for a couple of minutes (I left the kitchen for approx 3 mins!) it had dissolved and turned into a mess of mush! Not impressed at all.I did check the ham I bought as I'm well aware of additives in food as it is - as a rule I only ever buy organic meat and the guy on the deli counter advised me it was just plain ham.Does anyone know if oats are allowed? The book specifies oatmeal, but in the UK oats and oatmeal are two different things and I'm not sure which product the Americanisation refers to.Do you know what the worst part is? I've been asked to bake a cake for my friend's wedding in the summer, and since I've never done anything as big or important as a wedding cake before I'm baking about a cake a week to perfect my recipe as practice, but I can't eat any of it!! Torture! Still, my friends and family seem to be enjoying it :)
I've been trying a gluten-free diet for the last month or so. It hasn't helped my IBS at all.
If I have the discipline to do it, I might try the low FODMAP thing after trying the gluten-free diet.If you're just concerned about wheat gluten, based on my research, spelt is a relative of wheat and therefore is NOT gluten free. I'm a little confused about oats, but from what I can puzzle out oats are gluten free, but they're often processed in factories that also process wheat products. Because of this, it's difficult to find oats that don't contain traces of wheat gluten. I would say that oatmeal in the U.S. just refers to any hot cereal made from oats. Usually, that would be rolled oats or steel-cut oats cooked in water or milk. I agree with you about gluten-free bread! The first loaf of bread I bought was so crumbly and pasty that it made me gag and nearly throw up!!!! Your best bet is to find a local gluten-free bakery. Try choosing breads that contain a lot of egg and some xanthan gum. That'll give it a good texture. Rice pasta is probably the best alternative to wheat pasta, in my opinion, too. I don't know how any of that fits in with the FODMAP diet, however.
 

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I've seen conflicting info on spelt. Turns out some studies that showed low FODMAP presence were using sourdough spelt bread in their tests while other studies that have found FODMAPs did not use sourdough spelt bread. The thinking is that the fermentation happening in the sourdough mixture helps eliminate the FODMAPs.QuiQui, if you're feeling frisky (and/or incredibly miserable and tired of feeling sick), try going low-FODMAP. If you have issues with fermentable sugars, just eliminating gluten will probably not bring relief. When you're struggling for willpower it helps to remember how dreadful you feel when you're having an IBS attack, at least that's what helps me!If you don't cook much for yourself this diet is definitely challenging. Check out my blog for recipes! Happy Tummy Happy Life
 

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Recently my IBS C has started to get worse and worse, so I've just embarked on the FODMAP diet as recommended by a friend, who is a doctor. Not really sure where to start, I bought the book 'IBS - Free at Last' by Patsy Catsos as it had good reviews on Amazon. So, I went out shopping this weekend and bought all the 'allowed foods' in the book, only to find that the book is out of date and a lot of foods that she deems 'allowed' have now been ruled out. If anyone wants a massive bag of mushrooms and a cauliflower I have plenty going spare....The book is American and all food portions/recipes are measured out in cups, which is confusing to me. Trying to find a standard conversion table on the net has proved very difficult; in the past I've always gone on the knowledge that one cup is equivalent to 8 fluid ounces, but found many websites said that the measurement in ounces differs depending on the type of ingredient, e.g; whether you're measuring dry goods, or fruit, or liquid etc. So, I've just sort of been guessing.Anyway, I've been doing the diet for 4 days now, and I'm not expecting to see an improvement just yet. But, I'm really struggling with the portion sizes. I am a very big eater, plus I run on a regular basis so I'm constantly hungry, and four days into this diet I'm STARVING! The book I'm following sets a meal-plan to help you get the gist of the diet for the first two weeks, but some of the meals and snacks are leaving me with a rumble in my tummy! For example, a suggestion for a mid-morning snack is some cherry tomatoes and a low-fat mozzarella stick - I would usually eat a flapjack, a banana/raisins and 4 cheesy oatcakes!! She pads out a lot of the meals and snacks with nuts, and I'm terribly allergic to nuts so this is a no-go for me, but I'm not sure what I can replace this food group with without eating too many danger foods in one meal.Today, I've already eaten:Breakfast:1 cup cheerios, handful of blueberries & lacto-free milk1 rice cake with a little bit of butterMid-morning snack:2 rice cakes1 gherkin5 cherry tomatoes1/2 oz brieA small bit of ham1 celery stick1 boiled eggLunch:Baked potato with tuna, cucumber and mayoNot even sure if I should be eating this much, but my usual diet consists of lots of oats, dried fruit and pulses which I've had to eliminate. I don't find that raw fruit and veg fills me up as a snack so I'm having to eat loads of it for it to even touch the sides!Would be interested to know how other people have coped on this diet. Being a very thin person, I've never had to go on a diet before of any kind, so this is a real test of my willpower.
 

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Hi,sorry to hear you're struggling with the FODMAP diet. I've been on it a while now. I went to a dietitian to guide me. Basically, I strive to eat basic, pure food. For example, in the morning I'll eat gluten free porridge (I personally find ordinary porridge causes bloating)or eggs on gluten free toast, then for a snack I'll eat a banana,or gluten free oat cakes or corn cakes. Then for lunch I'll eat gluten free bread, tuna, sweetcorn, mayo or salmon. For dinner I'll eat meat and two veg. (roast chicken, potatoes, carrots and parsnips mashed, or pork, potatoes and sweetcorn or prawn/chicken stirfry with peppers, carrots, courgettes,corn. I hope this helps a small bit.
 

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I'm on day 3 of low-fodmap myself. Waiting on gastroenterologist appointment which I hope will help guide me right with it all.Because I also follow Slimming World, I'm not finding it too bad.Mayo however isn't lactose free
Although I might try to see if there are alternatives out there.I also don't eat nuts.I snack on the allowed fruits list and rice cakes, as well as alpro soya yogurts (which I really like
)For milk I use Kara Milk, it is derived from coconut and really nice. Much prefer it to soya milk. I found it in Tesco and Sainsburys in the long life milk section if that helps.Lean meats and veg from the allowed list are great.I am working from the document I found online, and noticed a copy on these forums too. For now I thought that would do until I get to the hospital for further help.Drink lots of water and sugar free squashes, they will help fill you up while you transition into the plan and eat less. It is hard, I liken it to when I gave up smoking, it isn't easy. But it is worth it.I read you should stick with low-fodmap strictly for 8 weeks initially. Which in the big scheme of things really isn't that long.You can do this!
And I'm sure those of us trying it out can offer hints and tips.
 

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Soy products that have not been fermented should be avoided during the elimination phase (such as soy milk and edamame, tofu and soy sauce is OK). Also, sweetcorn has been shown to be high in FODMAPs while corn meal used in baking is made from a different type of corn and is low in FODMAPs. Also have seen mixed info on coconut milk and coconut itself, but I personally don't have issues with it.
 

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For now I am using a basic list.Soy milk is fine according to that. And all lactose free milk and yogurts are fine (so long as you check out additives). So that covers alpro soya yogurts and kara milk (which is soy free, lactose free, diary free, low fat etc)
They seem to be okay for me so far. I don't have vast amounts anyway.Sweetcorn is in the no list.But everyone is different :)Info on Kara Milk, if you are interested
+ Made from freshly pressed coconut milk.+ Naturally free of lactose, cow's milk protein, soya and gluten.+ Ideal for anyone with lactose, cow's milk protein, soya or gluten intolerance.+ Suitable for vegans, vegetarians, and coeliacs.+ Cholesterol free and with calcium and fat levels matched to semi-skimmed milk. A naturally healthy option for all to enjoy.+ Palatable and versatile to use as drinks and in cooking.
 

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Thanks for the info. I've had coconut milk before but I don't like the texture. I prefer rice milk. For me, lactose-free dairy still made me very ill. Everyone is different though! Some things can be tolerated by others better or not at all. I have found I'm particularly sensitive to fructans, but polyols aren't as bad for me. Haven't done the galactan challenge yet.
 

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Oh I meant to mention, there's no reason that mayo should contain lactose. A classic mayo recipe is just oil, vinegar, and eggs. It looks creamy but that's because of the magic of emulsification. The egg yolks as natural emulsifiers allow the vinegar and oil to combine and become thick and creamy. Some brands add other flavoring agents but any decent mayo should be lactose-free.
 

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Oh I meant to mention, there's no reason that mayo should contain lactose. A classic mayo recipe is just oil, vinegar, and eggs. It looks creamy but that's because of the magic of emulsification. The egg yolks as natural emulsifiers allow the vinegar and oil to combine and become thick and creamy. Some brands add other flavoring agents but any decent mayo should be lactose-free.
I checked an ingredients list that included milk. So being safe for now I'm avoiding.
 
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