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I'm on day 3 of low-fodmap myself. Waiting on gastroenterologist appointment which I hope will help guide me right with it all.Because I also follow Slimming World, I'm not finding it too bad.Mayo however isn't lactose free
Although I might try to see if there are alternatives out there.I also don't eat nuts.I snack on the allowed fruits list and rice cakes, as well as alpro soya yogurts (which I really like
)For milk I use Kara Milk, it is derived from coconut and really nice. Much prefer it to soya milk. I found it in Tesco and Sainsburys in the long life milk section if that helps.Lean meats and veg from the allowed list are great.I am working from the document I found online, and noticed a copy on these forums too. For now I thought that would do until I get to the hospital for further help.Drink lots of water and sugar free squashes, they will help fill you up while you transition into the plan and eat less. It is hard, I liken it to when I gave up smoking, it isn't easy. But it is worth it.I read you should stick with low-fodmap strictly for 8 weeks initially. Which in the big scheme of things really isn't that long.You can do this!
And I'm sure those of us trying it out can offer hints and tips.
 

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For now I am using a basic list.Soy milk is fine according to that. And all lactose free milk and yogurts are fine (so long as you check out additives). So that covers alpro soya yogurts and kara milk (which is soy free, lactose free, diary free, low fat etc)
They seem to be okay for me so far. I don't have vast amounts anyway.Sweetcorn is in the no list.But everyone is different :)Info on Kara Milk, if you are interested
+ Made from freshly pressed coconut milk.+ Naturally free of lactose, cow's milk protein, soya and gluten.+ Ideal for anyone with lactose, cow's milk protein, soya or gluten intolerance.+ Suitable for vegans, vegetarians, and coeliacs.+ Cholesterol free and with calcium and fat levels matched to semi-skimmed milk. A naturally healthy option for all to enjoy.+ Palatable and versatile to use as drinks and in cooking.
 

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Oh I meant to mention, there's no reason that mayo should contain lactose. A classic mayo recipe is just oil, vinegar, and eggs. It looks creamy but that's because of the magic of emulsification. The egg yolks as natural emulsifiers allow the vinegar and oil to combine and become thick and creamy. Some brands add other flavoring agents but any decent mayo should be lactose-free.
I checked an ingredients list that included milk. So being safe for now I'm avoiding.
 

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That blows my mind. How does the milk not curdle? *shudder* I wonder what else is in it...Are you in the US? I would check a different brand because I've never heard of or seen milk in mayonnaise. Wouldn't know about Miracle Whip, that stuff grosses me out anyways.
sorry I was typing from my phone, I meant Milk Protein. And not being sure what that was I am avoiding.Ingredients from one I had (which is a supermarket brand):Water,Modified Maize Starch , Vegetable Oil (4%) ,Spirit Vinegar ,Sugar ,Glucose-Fructose Syrup ,Salt ,Free Range Pasteurised Egg &TempText1 , Stabilisers (Xanthan Gum, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Carboxymethylcellulose) ,Lemon Juice From Concentrate ,Milk Proteins , Colours (Titanium Dioxide, Paprika Extract, Lutein) , Preservative (Potassium Sorbate) ,TempText5.- Think i'll return to Hellmanns extra light mayo from now on!
 

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That's a lot of mystery ingredients! If all else fails, make your own. It's really quick and easy with a food processor and won't have all of those artificial ingredients and stabilizers in it. Try this recipe and throw everything into the food processor to make it easier: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Homemade-Mayonnaise-241868
Thank you :)I had a look at lots of other mayo brands last night and they all had stuff in I think I need to avoid. So yes, maybe making my own is the way to go.
 

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I'm new to the diet. But I noticed a difference after a week. I've read it can take 3 weeks to see a big improvement and that you need to try it for 8 weeks to be sure it will/will not work.Stick with it.
 

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Hi there, ,Wow I know the FODMAP diet is much a minefield as it is helpful! I've been coaching people on the Low FODMAP die since 2007 after I spent time with the research dietitians in Melbourne, Australia. It is so hard that the research has meant a few foods go from one list of safe or to avoid and sometimes back again! I thought it would be helpful to know that coconut milk and soy milk are back on the safe list and so are soy beans, tofu and soy milk. If you use soy flour try to get debittered soy flour. Oats are safe and don't worry about trying to source non contaminated sources. A bit of wheat flour as in sauce, gravy or cross contamination is fine for this Low FODMAP diet. Certain vegetables such as sweetcorn, pumpkin (squash), broccoli and brussel sprouts and beetroot can be eaten, as long as you have only 1/2 cup maximum per meal of these singularly or combined.Corn flour and maize flour and polenta are all fine to eat.Certainly I find this diet is good for about 75% of people who trial it. But there are a couple of other things just be aware of. If you have constipation, do make sure you eat plenty of safe vegetables, some safe fruit, nuts, seeds, linseed etc to keep up your fiber or else worsening constipation can make all other symptoms of bloating etc worse.And yes many people with IBS are intolerant to oats, all gluten soy, citrus and / or milk so there may well still be other foods you are sensitive to that are allowed on the Low FODMAP diet.I have found some people feel the difference the first 2 days of the diet and for some it can take a month or 6 weeks.After you have trialled the diet for 6 to 8 weeks, then my suggestion is, if you want to, you re challenge each of the major groups; onion, garlic, wheat products, vegetables and the fruits to identify your own tolerance to them.I hope that helps and good luck!
Such a great lot of information :)I am IBS-C, what are the best veg and fruits for me to have to prevent worsening C? I use Movicol to help as well.
 

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There is no set amount of fiber needed for everyone but do aim for a variety of different fiber rich foods, such as spinach, silver beet(swiss chard), carrots, capsicum (peppers), tomatoes, radishes, celery. Have some fruit such as pineapple, an orange or kiwifruit twice a day and add linseed to breakfast cereal or into a breakfast smoothie. I have found that many people need a fiber supplement too as it is hard to eat enough fiber every day so if you have one that works, great, stick with it! If the effect 'wears off' as they sometimes do, then switch to a different supplement for a few weeks/ months and then rotate back again.All the best...
Thank you. I eat a lot of red pepper, carrots, toms and pineapple, so looks like I am part of the way there :)I was just worried with doing low-fodmap that I might not get enough fibre, but equally I didn't want too much either.Really appreciate the advice, many thanks
 

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I've been doing it a few weeks now. I have seen a decrease in bloating and pain. The C is difficult to judge because I went on movicol at about the same time.I am trying to balance things to make sure I'm getting enough veg/fruit/fibre.But yes, for me so far so good.Ref coconut milk, from another thread on here I read this was now okay. I've been using Kara Milk which is derived from coconuts. Low in carbs and fat. It's diary and lactose free. Really nice in tea/coffee and cereal (I use gluten free porridge and gluten free fibre flakes). It hasn't been causing me any problems at all.I've also been fine with soya yogurts (Alpro Soya).I have noticed that if I have a large portion of fruit in one sitting that I get symptoms, which is something I'd not seen before trying low-fodmap.I'm also waiting on a gasto appointment referral, which I hope will also lead to a dietician referral so I can have assistance monitoring this diet properly as you are supposed to be supervised.
 

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You shouldnt have to give up oats! i eat loads with no trouble. i just make sure to get the gluten free ones so i know theres no contamination of wheat.i also eat lots of quinoa, millet and buckwheat which is healthy and filling. jacket potatoes are good too as well as noodles made from rice, buckwheat and/or corn.i know you said you're allergic to nuts but are seeds ok for you? hemp, chia and flax are all very nutritious. i also like sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seeds.as far as cheese goes i just look at the nutritional info on the packet. in the carbs section it lists total carbs and then "of which sugars". if it lists little or no sugar then there cant be any lactose so its fine. the lists online just say brie is ok, mozzerella is not etc but until you actually read the label you dont know. i've found brie thats high in sugar but mozzerella thats low.....i just look at every cheese in the shop until i find one without sugar!
I'm the same, I use porridge oats that are marked gluten free :)I'm also fine with Jacket potatoes and rice and corn cakes.Cheese, i use lactofree, which is a lactose free hard cheese.
 
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