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I checked an ingredients list that included milk. So being safe for now I'm avoiding.
That blows my mind. How does the milk not curdle? *shudder* I wonder what else is in it...Are you in the US? I would check a different brand because I've never heard of or seen milk in mayonnaise. Wouldn't know about Miracle Whip, that stuff grosses me out anyways.
 

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That blows my mind. How does the milk not curdle? *shudder* I wonder what else is in it...Are you in the US? I would check a different brand because I've never heard of or seen milk in mayonnaise. Wouldn't know about Miracle Whip, that stuff grosses me out anyways.
sorry I was typing from my phone, I meant Milk Protein. And not being sure what that was I am avoiding.Ingredients from one I had (which is a supermarket brand):Water,Modified Maize Starch , Vegetable Oil (4%) ,Spirit Vinegar ,Sugar ,Glucose-Fructose Syrup ,Salt ,Free Range Pasteurised Egg &TempText1 , Stabilisers (Xanthan Gum, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Carboxymethylcellulose) ,Lemon Juice From Concentrate ,Milk Proteins , Colours (Titanium Dioxide, Paprika Extract, Lutein) , Preservative (Potassium Sorbate) ,TempText5.- Think i'll return to Hellmanns extra light mayo from now on!
 

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sorry I was typing from my phone, I meant Milk Protein. And not being sure what that was I am avoiding.Ingredients from one I had (which is a supermarket brand):Water,Modified Maize Starch , Vegetable Oil (4%) ,Spirit Vinegar ,Sugar ,Glucose-Fructose Syrup ,Salt ,Free Range Pasteurised Egg &TempText1 , Stabilisers (Xanthan Gum, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Carboxymethylcellulose) ,Lemon Juice From Concentrate ,Milk Proteins , Colours (Titanium Dioxide, Paprika Extract, Lutein) , Preservative (Potassium Sorbate) ,TempText5.- Think i'll return to Hellmanns extra light mayo from now on!
That's a lot of mystery ingredients! If all else fails, make your own. It's really quick and easy with a food processor and won't have all of those artificial ingredients and stabilizers in it. Try this recipe and throw everything into the food processor to make it easier: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Homemade-Mayonnaise-241868
 

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That's a lot of mystery ingredients! If all else fails, make your own. It's really quick and easy with a food processor and won't have all of those artificial ingredients and stabilizers in it. Try this recipe and throw everything into the food processor to make it easier: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Homemade-Mayonnaise-241868
Thank you :)I had a look at lots of other mayo brands last night and they all had stuff in I think I need to avoid. So yes, maybe making my own is the way to go.
 

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So I'm trying to get an idea from people who have had success with low FODMAPs...did you feel instant relief or did it take you a few weeks to notice any difference? I am the most impatient person on the planet and after 2 days of trying the diet and still being bloated as ever, I am frustrated! Haha! I will totally deal with it though if I know in the end, my symptoms will subside.
 

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I'm new to the diet. But I noticed a difference after a week. I've read it can take 3 weeks to see a big improvement and that you need to try it for 8 weeks to be sure it will/will not work.Stick with it.
 

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Hi there, ,Wow I know the FODMAP diet is much a minefield as it is helpful! I've been coaching people on the Low FODMAP die since 2007 after I spent time with the research dietitians in Melbourne, Australia. It is so hard that the research has meant a few foods go from one list of safe or to avoid and sometimes back again! I thought it would be helpful to know that coconut milk and soy milk are back on the safe list and so are soy beans, tofu and soy milk. If you use soy flour try to get debittered soy flour. Oats are safe and don't worry about trying to source non contaminated sources. A bit of wheat flour as in sauce, gravy or cross contamination is fine for this Low FODMAP diet. Certain vegetables such as sweetcorn, pumpkin (squash), broccoli and brussel sprouts and beetroot can be eaten, as long as you have only 1/2 cup maximum per meal of these singularly or combined.Corn flour and maize flour and polenta are all fine to eat.Certainly I find this diet is good for about 75% of people who trial it. But there are a couple of other things just be aware of. If you have constipation, do make sure you eat plenty of safe vegetables, some safe fruit, nuts, seeds, linseed etc to keep up your fiber or else worsening constipation can make all other symptoms of bloating etc worse.And yes many people with IBS are intolerant to oats, all gluten soy, citrus and / or milk so there may well still be other foods you are sensitive to that are allowed on the Low FODMAP diet.I have found some people feel the difference the first 2 days of the diet and for some it can take a month or 6 weeks.After you have trialled the diet for 6 to 8 weeks, then my suggestion is, if you want to, you re challenge each of the major groups; onion, garlic, wheat products, vegetables and the fruits to identify your own tolerance to them.I hope that helps and good luck!
 

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Hi there, ,Wow I know the FODMAP diet is much a minefield as it is helpful! I've been coaching people on the Low FODMAP die since 2007 after I spent time with the research dietitians in Melbourne, Australia. It is so hard that the research has meant a few foods go from one list of safe or to avoid and sometimes back again! I thought it would be helpful to know that coconut milk and soy milk are back on the safe list and so are soy beans, tofu and soy milk. If you use soy flour try to get debittered soy flour. Oats are safe and don't worry about trying to source non contaminated sources. A bit of wheat flour as in sauce, gravy or cross contamination is fine for this Low FODMAP diet. Certain vegetables such as sweetcorn, pumpkin (squash), broccoli and brussel sprouts and beetroot can be eaten, as long as you have only 1/2 cup maximum per meal of these singularly or combined.Corn flour and maize flour and polenta are all fine to eat.Certainly I find this diet is good for about 75% of people who trial it. But there are a couple of other things just be aware of. If you have constipation, do make sure you eat plenty of safe vegetables, some safe fruit, nuts, seeds, linseed etc to keep up your fiber or else worsening constipation can make all other symptoms of bloating etc worse.And yes many people with IBS are intolerant to oats, all gluten soy, citrus and / or milk so there may well still be other foods you are sensitive to that are allowed on the Low FODMAP diet.I have found some people feel the difference the first 2 days of the diet and for some it can take a month or 6 weeks.After you have trialled the diet for 6 to 8 weeks, then my suggestion is, if you want to, you re challenge each of the major groups; onion, garlic, wheat products, vegetables and the fruits to identify your own tolerance to them.I hope that helps and good luck!
Such a great lot of information :)I am IBS-C, what are the best veg and fruits for me to have to prevent worsening C? I use Movicol to help as well.
 

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I've had to drop the fodmap diet for now... I keep getting very bad headaches throughout the day and I'm sure it must be related to low blood sugar, because as soon as I have a decent snack they disappear within ten minutes. I've always had problems with feeling hungry (I need to snack little and often on something substantial like a banana or a flapjack), and when I was a teenager low blood sugar was a trigger for migraines (from which I still suffer occasionally). Hard boiled eggs seem to keep the hunger at bay, however, it's not convenient for me to just whack one out in the middle of the office or a meeting as it's really anti social (they stink!). My office is a very busy place and there's literally nowhere where I can go to secretively scoff an egg.Also, I've seen no improvement in 2 1/2 weeks (I know I should really stick at it for longer to see an improvement), in fact I've just had one of the worst bouts of IBS I've ever had! I think I'll need to talk to a dietician or a nutritionist to work out a proper way of tackling this elimination diet. But, I'm skeptical about seeing someone who isn't a medically confirmed Dr as I've heard all sorts about these people just spouting claptrap, so I don't want to end up wasting my money.
 

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Such a great lot of information :)I am IBS-C, what are the best veg and fruits for me to have to prevent worsening C? I use Movicol to help as well.
There is no set amount of fiber needed for everyone but do aim for a variety of different fiber rich foods, such as spinach, silver beet(swiss chard), carrots, capsicum (peppers), tomatoes, radishes, celery. Have some fruit such as pineapple, an orange or kiwifruit twice a day and add linseed to breakfast cereal or into a breakfast smoothie. I have found that many people need a fiber supplement too as it is hard to eat enough fiber every day so if you have one that works, great, stick with it! If the effect 'wears off' as they sometimes do, then switch to a different supplement for a few weeks/ months and then rotate back again.All the best...
 

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There is no set amount of fiber needed for everyone but do aim for a variety of different fiber rich foods, such as spinach, silver beet(swiss chard), carrots, capsicum (peppers), tomatoes, radishes, celery. Have some fruit such as pineapple, an orange or kiwifruit twice a day and add linseed to breakfast cereal or into a breakfast smoothie. I have found that many people need a fiber supplement too as it is hard to eat enough fiber every day so if you have one that works, great, stick with it! If the effect 'wears off' as they sometimes do, then switch to a different supplement for a few weeks/ months and then rotate back again.All the best...
Thank you. I eat a lot of red pepper, carrots, toms and pineapple, so looks like I am part of the way there :)I was just worried with doing low-fodmap that I might not get enough fibre, but equally I didn't want too much either.Really appreciate the advice, many thanks
 

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I thought it would be helpful to know that coconut milk and soy milk are back on the safe list and so are soy beans, tofu and soy milk. If you use soy flour try to get debittered soy flour.
Can someone verify when this was determined? With a link? I've had some issues recently that I think maybe have been linked to soy flour and soy yogurt.
 

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Can someone verify when this was determined? With a link? I've had some issues recently that I think maybe have been linked to soy flour and soy yogurt.
I have checked to see if there is the latest updated list on line but unfortunately can't see one. Much of the updated information is forwarded during workshops that dietitians attend in Melbourne, Australia.In Sue Shepherd's latest book 'The Food Intolerance Management Plan' published 2011 she writes '"Soy flour contains GOS and fructans but in small amounts as part of recipe, do not cause IBS symptoms in most people. You should assess your own tolerance." And in relation to soy products for Vegetarians Sue Shepherd writes '"The soy related FOMDAPs that occur in tofu, tempeh, miso and soy milk, soy yoghurt and soy cheese are generally tolerated well by people following the Low FOMDAP Diet, but this is not always predictable... In other words you need to determine your own threshold of tolerance."For many people with IBS they may have other food intolerances (also) going on to the protein or chemical of a food such as soy protein. So yes you could well be intolerant to soy flour and yoghurt either due to the FODMAPs and / or the protein. As with all food suspects, eliminate them for 2 to 4 weeks and then rechallenge over a 2 day period to confirm they trigger back the symptoms.Wishing you well...
 

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I have checked to see if there is the latest updated list on line but unfortunately can't see one. Much of the updated information is forwarded during workshops that dietitians attend in Melbourne, Australia.In Sue Shepherd's latest book 'The Food Intolerance Management Plan' published 2011 she writes '"Soy flour contains GOS and fructans but in small amounts as part of recipe, do not cause IBS symptoms in most people. You should assess your own tolerance." And in relation to soy products for Vegetarians Sue Shepherd writes '"The soy related FOMDAPs that occur in tofu, tempeh, miso and soy milk, soy yoghurt and soy cheese are generally tolerated well by people following the Low FOMDAP Diet, but this is not always predictable... In other words you need to determine your own threshold of tolerance."For many people with IBS they may have other food intolerances (also) going on to the protein or chemical of a food such as soy protein. So yes you could well be intolerant to soy flour and yoghurt either due to the FODMAPs and / or the protein. As with all food suspects, eliminate them for 2 to 4 weeks and then rechallenge over a 2 day period to confirm they trigger back the symptoms.Wishing you well...
Interesting. I'm 99% sure that soy yogurt set me off pretty badly a couple weeks back, so I'm staying away from that for now. It's harder for me because I was born with a dairy allergy, so soy is in most dairy alternatives. Also was just prescribed Rifaximin for 10 days so I'm hopeful that a combo of that + "elimination" i.e. no FODMAP diet for a while will help, and then I can slowly introduce things back in. I miss wheat the most, along with onions, garlic, and tomato paste (basically all the ingredients in spaghetti...which would basically be impossible on no-FODMAP diet). I could deal with losing just about everything else if I had to.Could you quote anything about coconut milk she mentions in her book?
My wife was thinking she could try to make some asian-y dishes with that but I wanted to make sure first. Thanks!
 

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I've been doing it a few weeks now. I have seen a decrease in bloating and pain. The C is difficult to judge because I went on movicol at about the same time.I am trying to balance things to make sure I'm getting enough veg/fruit/fibre.But yes, for me so far so good.Ref coconut milk, from another thread on here I read this was now okay. I've been using Kara Milk which is derived from coconuts. Low in carbs and fat. It's diary and lactose free. Really nice in tea/coffee and cereal (I use gluten free porridge and gluten free fibre flakes). It hasn't been causing me any problems at all.I've also been fine with soya yogurts (Alpro Soya).I have noticed that if I have a large portion of fruit in one sitting that I get symptoms, which is something I'd not seen before trying low-fodmap.I'm also waiting on a gasto appointment referral, which I hope will also lead to a dietician referral so I can have assistance monitoring this diet properly as you are supposed to be supervised.
 

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Interesting. I'm 99% sure that soy yogurt set me off pretty badly a couple weeks back, so I'm staying away from that for now. It's harder for me because I was born with a dairy allergy, so soy is in most dairy alternatives. Also was just prescribed Rifaximin for 10 days so I'm hopeful that a combo of that + "elimination" i.e. no FODMAP diet for a while will help, and then I can slowly introduce things back in. I miss wheat the most, along with onions, garlic, and tomato paste (basically all the ingredients in spaghetti...which would basically be impossible on no-FODMAP diet). I could deal with losing just about everything else if I had to.Could you quote anything about coconut milk she mentions in her book?
My wife was thinking she could try to make some asian-y dishes with that but I wanted to make sure first. Thanks!
I have looked through the 'Food intolerance Management Plan' book and can't see any mention of coconut milk or coconut cream specifically. The book does state that 'All nuts are allowed'. In the earlier testing in 2007 coconut milk and coconut cream were not allowed but later testing showed they were fine after all. Just be aware that 1 can (400 ml) of coconut cream does contain a huge amount of fat (100 g). And since in IBS the gut is usually more sensitive to volumes of fat, coconut cream may not be tolerated in large amounts because of this. I would only use a small amount - a couple of tablespoons per meal of the coconut cream or use light coconut milk instead. Coconut water should also be fine to drink.
 

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Not even sure if I should be eating this much, but my usual diet consists of lots of oats, dried fruit and pulses which I've had to eliminate. I don't find that raw fruit and veg fills me up as a snack so I'm having to eat loads of it for it to even touch the sides!Would be interested to know how other people have coped on this diet. Being a very thin person, I've never had to go on a diet before of any kind, so this is a real test of my willpower.
You shouldnt have to give up oats! i eat loads with no trouble. i just make sure to get the gluten free ones so i know theres no contamination of wheat.i also eat lots of quinoa, millet and buckwheat which is healthy and filling. jacket potatoes are good too as well as noodles made from rice, buckwheat and/or corn.i know you said you're allergic to nuts but are seeds ok for you? hemp, chia and flax are all very nutritious. i also like sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seeds.as far as cheese goes i just look at the nutritional info on the packet. in the carbs section it lists total carbs and then "of which sugars". if it lists little or no sugar then there cant be any lactose so its fine. the lists online just say brie is ok, mozzerella is not etc but until you actually read the label you dont know. i've found brie thats high in sugar but mozzerella thats low.....i just look at every cheese in the shop until i find one without sugar!
 

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You shouldnt have to give up oats! i eat loads with no trouble. i just make sure to get the gluten free ones so i know theres no contamination of wheat.i also eat lots of quinoa, millet and buckwheat which is healthy and filling. jacket potatoes are good too as well as noodles made from rice, buckwheat and/or corn.i know you said you're allergic to nuts but are seeds ok for you? hemp, chia and flax are all very nutritious. i also like sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seeds.as far as cheese goes i just look at the nutritional info on the packet. in the carbs section it lists total carbs and then "of which sugars". if it lists little or no sugar then there cant be any lactose so its fine. the lists online just say brie is ok, mozzerella is not etc but until you actually read the label you dont know. i've found brie thats high in sugar but mozzerella thats low.....i just look at every cheese in the shop until i find one without sugar!
I'm the same, I use porridge oats that are marked gluten free :)I'm also fine with Jacket potatoes and rice and corn cakes.Cheese, i use lactofree, which is a lactose free hard cheese.
 
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