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Before I ask my question, I want to commend all of you on a great discussion board. Everybody is incredibly thoughtful and helpful. OK - how did you all go about eliminating foods to discover triggers? My dr. suggested gluten and dairy. Are there any other groups that need to be eliminated? Fats? Did you keep a journal? How did you know what foods triggered the symptoms? (how long after would symptoms occur? ) Give me your thoughts...
 

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Hi deirpg, so glad you like this board
Welcome if you're newish (sorry to be ignorant if you're not).I eliminated foods which caused diarrhoea with my own methods. I found I had quick reactions to foods - 5 to 15 minutes, so it was pretty straightforward finding the cause & effect. Nowadays I am developing new food intolerances which are always a delayed reaction - up to 24 hours later. I know then which is the offending food because I eat a varied but constant diet - all the same foods regularly, nothing new. So if I introduce something new, it's easy to tell. You might like to start by eliminating foods which are stimulants - such as caffeine (coffee gives me terrible D, but tea and chocolate are fine thankfully), fatty and fried food, and hot spices. These can stimulate the GI tract in to spasms and D. These stimulants I think may be common ones. My other food intolerances seem to be quite particular to me - creme fraiche, soya & haricot beans and several more. I saw a herbalist who suggested some foods that I could eliminate to reduce bloating and heartburn, which was very helpful. Good luck!------------------susanIBS D/C type & M.E/CFS
 

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Hi deirpg, so glad you like this board
Welcome if you're newish (sorry to be ignorant if you're not).I eliminated foods which caused diarrhoea with my own methods. I found I had quick reactions to foods - 5 to 15 minutes, so it was pretty straightforward finding the cause & effect. Nowadays I am developing new food intolerances which are always a delayed reaction - up to 24 hours later. I know then which is the offending food because I eat a varied but constant diet - all the same foods regularly, nothing new. So if I introduce something new, it's easy to tell. You might like to start by eliminating foods which are stimulants - such as caffeine (coffee gives me terrible D, but tea and chocolate are fine thankfully), fatty and fried food, and hot spices. These can stimulate the GI tract in to spasms and D. These stimulants I think may be common ones. My other food intolerances seem to be quite particular to me - creme fraiche, soya & haricot beans and several more. I saw a herbalist who suggested some foods that I could eliminate to reduce bloating and heartburn, which was very helpful. Good luck!------------------susanIBS D/C type & M.E/CFS
 

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Keeping a journal will probably be helpful because as a rule humans remember what they ate and when they had symptoms very poorly. It may be a good idea to start out with a couple of weeks of just eating like you normally do then start mucking with the diet, that way you have a base line. Most people have symptoms of a food within the first 48-72 hours. If something looks suspicious then eliminating that for a week and then bringing it back in for a 3 day run should help figure things out.One caveat food is NOT the only trigger running around so that can complicate things.Also some things may help some but not completely and it is easier to see that when you have the written record vs your memory.Things to look at:Starches. Some people may have problems with gluten, but often that is when they have celiac disease. It may or may not be particularly helpful in most people with IBS, but it may help some. Eliminating all gluten is typcially rather difficult to do, but cutting back on wheat, barley and rye may help.Most starches (grains and potatos) even when they don't have gluten in them are not that well digested by us and can cause gas when the colon bacteria feed on them.Rice is a notable exception to this and is probably why alot of IBSers eat alot of rice.Eating whole grains rather than processed may help alot if increasing fiber helps to control your symptoms. Generally it is best to switch to whole grains a bit at a time as really upping the fiber all at once can be bothersome,Fruits and vegetables.Fiber in them can be good for most people, unless fiber bothers you.Sorbitol. A mixed blessing. When your constipated they can loosen the stools but may cause diarrhea in some people. (apples pears peaches and plums/prunes are high in sorbitol).Beans and Cabbage have raffinose in them and this sugar is not well digested by us, but is by the bacteria in the colon.Dairy. Usually it is the lactose that is the problem and that is mostly in milk. Yogurt and aged cheeses for the most part have little of this left. Some young cheeses like cottage cheese may be bothersome.Fat can be a trigger for alot of people.Alcohol and caffiene can again be a mixed blessing. They loosen the stools. And depending on your symptoms that may or may not be a good thing. Alcohol consumption should be limited to one serving a day for woman and two for men on general health concerns.K.------------------I have worked for the government and at universities doing scientific research primarily in the area of the environment and the impact of environmental factors on human health, I have never done any independant clinical testing for the pharmaceutical industry, nor have I ever worked for a drug company. I have no financial, academic, or any other stake in any commercial, natural, or any other product mentioned by me.My story and what worked for me in greatly easing my IBS: http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/Forum17/HTML/000015.html[This message has been edited by kmottus (edited 08-24-2001).]
 

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Keeping a journal will probably be helpful because as a rule humans remember what they ate and when they had symptoms very poorly. It may be a good idea to start out with a couple of weeks of just eating like you normally do then start mucking with the diet, that way you have a base line. Most people have symptoms of a food within the first 48-72 hours. If something looks suspicious then eliminating that for a week and then bringing it back in for a 3 day run should help figure things out.One caveat food is NOT the only trigger running around so that can complicate things.Also some things may help some but not completely and it is easier to see that when you have the written record vs your memory.Things to look at:Starches. Some people may have problems with gluten, but often that is when they have celiac disease. It may or may not be particularly helpful in most people with IBS, but it may help some. Eliminating all gluten is typcially rather difficult to do, but cutting back on wheat, barley and rye may help.Most starches (grains and potatos) even when they don't have gluten in them are not that well digested by us and can cause gas when the colon bacteria feed on them.Rice is a notable exception to this and is probably why alot of IBSers eat alot of rice.Eating whole grains rather than processed may help alot if increasing fiber helps to control your symptoms. Generally it is best to switch to whole grains a bit at a time as really upping the fiber all at once can be bothersome,Fruits and vegetables.Fiber in them can be good for most people, unless fiber bothers you.Sorbitol. A mixed blessing. When your constipated they can loosen the stools but may cause diarrhea in some people. (apples pears peaches and plums/prunes are high in sorbitol).Beans and Cabbage have raffinose in them and this sugar is not well digested by us, but is by the bacteria in the colon.Dairy. Usually it is the lactose that is the problem and that is mostly in milk. Yogurt and aged cheeses for the most part have little of this left. Some young cheeses like cottage cheese may be bothersome.Fat can be a trigger for alot of people.Alcohol and caffiene can again be a mixed blessing. They loosen the stools. And depending on your symptoms that may or may not be a good thing. Alcohol consumption should be limited to one serving a day for woman and two for men on general health concerns.K.------------------I have worked for the government and at universities doing scientific research primarily in the area of the environment and the impact of environmental factors on human health, I have never done any independant clinical testing for the pharmaceutical industry, nor have I ever worked for a drug company. I have no financial, academic, or any other stake in any commercial, natural, or any other product mentioned by me.My story and what worked for me in greatly easing my IBS: http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/Forum17/HTML/000015.html[This message has been edited by kmottus (edited 08-24-2001).]
 
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