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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
wow, i'm reeling. i just got the results back from my ELISA food panel and i tested off the charts intolerant to:cornbananaasparagusegg yolkpineapplekidney and lima beanssesamekiwisunflowerand all forms of yeastcrazy, that's a lot of stuff. and corn and yeast are in everything. i actually thought i had celiac disease because i was having a real problem with bread. now i know why. i will keep you guys posted on how i am doing on my new diet. hopefully this will make a big difference in how i feel as i was ready to just give up, lay down, and die. well, not quite. but it sure feels like it sometimes. i'm sooo tired all of the time, my joints hurt, i have headaches every day, and my stomach...oh, my stomach...don't even get me started about that.well, my question is, for anyone who knows, can food intolerances, other than gluten intolerance, cause malabsorption. i seem to be suffering from that these days. any info.?carrie
 

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quote:well, my question is, for anyone who knows, can food intolerances, other than gluten intolerance, cause malabsorption.
The more relevant question is whether you are intolerant of any of those foods at all.
 

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I'm just guessing, but it seems to me that an intolerance to something, sets the body into a reaction, rejecting that item. It would make sense that it could possibly cause malabsorption to a degree, but I believe there could be other causes as well.You can't really be sure until you stick with the diet changes for a while and see if things improve, if they don't there is probably another cause.Lori
 

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Wow what a list. Those are all foods I like.I am finding that I have no tollerance for Oregano, tomato sauce, and now even Rosemary sets me off. Oh and onions also are bad for me.I can still eat Chilli and Jalapenos though so I'm not in too bad shape. LOL
 

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quote:well of course she is intolerant to those foods. the ELISA test does not lie
The one she had did.
 

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i am sure it is available in london. however, traditional medicine still does not use it. they are behind the times -- stuck in old, out-dated ways of doing things.the MRT test might actually be better. (mediator release test).you may want to search this one out on the web. however, the elisa test is okay.
 

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quote:traditional medicine still does not use it. they are behind the times -- stuck in old, out-dated ways of doing things. the MRT test might actually be better. (mediator release test). you may want to search this one out on the web. however, the elisa test is okay.
quote:Would you mind lending me that amazing crystal ball flux?
The common allergies are to things like nuts, milk and eggs. Now only small percentage of people have food allergies and then it is to usually one of those food items.Allergies would also probably make you sick enough to know which foods are bad and you wouldn't really need a test to tell. In addition, what this test tests and food allergies usually does not match.In addition, this type of test is not really accurate anyway. I would not be surprised if the poster had no allergies whatsoever.
 

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correct Lori. also, food intolerances can be extremely tricky to discover. first of all they don't just show up one day in full force. it is a very slow, drawn out process. that slow process combined with "delayed reactions" make it very difficult for the sufferer to know what is happening. however, there are some foods that will give the person a real fast unmistakeable symptom that the food should be avoided. an example would be if a person eats citrus and then has explosive diarhea.also, the nature of food intolerances or sensitivities (a term i do not like) is that the food can sometimes give a "narcotic" like effect. this sets up a vicious cycle whereby the person begins to crave what they are allergic to, and if they don't consume it they go into withdrawal. the effect is almost similar to what some beer drinkers experience. if the beer drinker switches from a beer that is brewed from wheat to one brewed with rice -- the "beer buzz" is not nearly the same.
 

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quote:Intolerance and allergy are NOT the same thing
Yes, all these tests are intended for allergies, not intolerances. Intolerances include chemical intolerances such as chinese restaurant syndrome and don't involve the immune system (at least not directly). There are no specific tests for them, only double-blinded challenges. Intolerances appear to be relatively rare too, however.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
okay, here goes. wow, thank you all for responding, especially you mikeralph ( i will check into your suggestion). as far as the test in london goes, try searching on the web for elisa food intolerances lab and london. or go to a naturopath, they would be able to help you with that.the food intolerances that i tested positive for are no surprise to me. as i said, i've had a problem with bread for a while, and i've been unable to eat vinegar or alcohol for a few years because they give me diarrhea, heartburn, and headaches. the only thing i knew that i was allergic to (i.e. oral/airway/digestive immediate reaction, positive skin prick test) was kiwi. then, about a year ago i had the same reaction to banana. i have a milder, similar reaction to pineapple in the form of a metallic taste in the back of my throat after i eat it and instant diarrhea. asparagus, kidney and lima beans have all been things that i have avoided since i was a teenager, even though i like the way they taste. i just have an aversion to them. now i know why. the kicker is the corn. the only symptom of corn intolerance that i've noticed is that when i eat something that has corn in it, the roof of my mouth and my throat itches. i am constantly rubbing my tongue on the roof of my mouth trying to control it. i never really thought that it was related to corn until i got my test results back. i then went to the food diary that i've been keeping for the past six months and looked for the meals where i ate corn, had soda or corn syrup sweetened juice, or any corn product. and sure enough, that was the only time that i noticed that reaction.i have food intolerances as well, ones that are not immune system related. tomatoes, onions, and beef all send me running to the bathroom. so, i know i'm going to have to figure those out on my own.flux, i'm sorry to say this, but i have personal evidence that you may not be not correct in this. i have noticed problems with all of the food that i tested postive to. some were after the fact, true. but, i have a food diary going back six months to look through. i tend to be a non-believer by nature, so the only proof for me will be when i feel better. but, there is sufficient evidence to suggest that these are, in fact, problem foods for me. i am willing to take a chance and see what happens. i try to remind people that medical science is constantly changing. what is believed to be true today may change completely five, ten, fifteen years from now. there is no harm in trying this approach, even though it does not have the backing of the traditional medical community. i've had too many experiences with my various health problems where i was told one thing and then five years later, told something entirely different. (as in polycystic ovarian disease is caused by being fat, it's your fault. oh wait, we mean being fat is caused by polycystic ovarian disease, sorry).okay, i've rambled enough. carrie
 

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Something I posted on this other thread might be of interest in this discussion: http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php...=1;t=031913;p=2 First, as is always the case when this subject comes up, it seems those with the least study on the subject make the most firmly declarative statements on the matter. And thus contain as much, if not more, inaccuracy than folks who never read a thing and simply relied upon common sense.These books are recommended to be read as a starting point to understanding the subject of what food allergy is as opposed to food �intolerance� (a very general term which is defined at least 4 different ways depending upon whom you read�there is no standardized nomenclature, therefore we must define what we are saying when we use a certain term or it confuses and confounds the hell out of suck people trying to honestly learn something�) ________________________________________________�FOOD ALLERGIES AND FOOD INTOLERANCE: THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO THEIR IDENTIFICTION AND TREATMENT�, Professor Jonathan Brostoff , M.D.. Allergy, Immunology and Environmental Medicine, Kings� College, London http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/089...6487508-3420903 FOOD ALLERGY AND INTOLERANCE, Professor Jonathan Brostoff, MD, Stephen Challacombe, MD (NEW 2002) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/070...product-details __________________________________________________ Once we have made a study via these books, then there are at least 15 years worth of papers to read, published in journals from around the world and presented at medical conferences as well. An integrative study must be done, inclusive of literature which may not conform to ones filters as the authors used different names for patient selection than perhaps another did, so if you exclude anything whereby the nomenclature does not match exactly you exclude a large amount of information from ones personal study.Having said that as a preamable and without delving into authorship just a couple of comments to amplify: ____________________________________________�well of course she is intolerant to those foods. the ELISA test does not lie.� _____________________________________________Ah my friend if only �twer true.
The problem with any immunoassay is not with the assay itself, however, but how we apply it. What is �accurate� si the question crying for definition. The latest generation ELISA and RAST indeed are quite accurate at detecting what they say they can detect: all they can claim to detect is that which they claim which is basically one or another specific immunoglobulin�in this case to foods.The problem is that this does not translate, in any given patient, directly into CLINICAL reactivity to that food. So, while a well done test indeed may not lie, the immune system does not reveal its behavior as clearly as we would like.
The results have to be taken into the context of history. As Le Grande Fromage does state, in his own inimitable way, if it is true food allergy�IgE�Type I Gel & Coombs Hypersnesitivity�the history and dietary intake records alone will reveal basically all true food allergy. The reaction is not dose dependent, it is rapid onset, and thus it is highly reproducible with oral challenge. "Don't try this at home kids without the epi standing by" for some people get anaphylactic. But you know who you are by now.Thus by the time we are adults we know if we have a true food allergy. This occurs (general concensus) in about 2% of the general population, but more frequently as a comorbidity in IBS victims�some of Stefaninis work with �allergy treatments� in IBS patients suggests perhaps 8%.Indeed if one does IgG and IgG subclasses, one is looking at another possible mechanism by which a person may suffer delayed-hypersensitivity reactions to foods. Keep in mind the limitations just mentioned, and the fact that there are multiple possible mechanisms which lead to the end game of proinflammatory mediator release in the body inr esponse to food challenge�lost oral tolerance�.and IgG is but one. If you only look at trees in a forest you may never see the ragweed which is causing the actual symptoms and reach a conclusion just as tentative as assuming Ig[x]+ is diagnostic�you may see nothing, when the patient is reactive to something but the mechanism does not involve IgE or IgG�or any Ig[x] at all for that matter. This is a handy book to read to learn about the immune system and some basics on hypersensitivity�THE IMMUNE SYSTEMPeter Parham, Ph.D.Professor, Structural Biology, Microbiology and ImmunologyStanford University http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/081...5533461-6834310 __________________________________________"Intolerances include chemical intolerances such as chinese restaurant syndrome and don't involve the immune system (at least not directly)." ___________________________________________Whether that is true or not depends not upon physiology but upon terminology. Complement activation, T Cell responses, cytotoxic responses, ad nauseum all involve one form or another of an immunologic reaction but they are not �allergy��. Some who hold-forth on the subject include these in �intolerance� and some refer to them as �non allergic hypersensitivity��some do say that intolerance is only enzymatic and/or biochemical�or biochemical are pseudoallergy�
terms-dujour should not be used to as the medium of information conveyance. It is awkward but until the medical field as a whole comes to a concensus we need to make the extra effort to define the context of anything on the subject and use specificity instead of the bizzwords as they are not uniform yet.It is easier sometimes to simply separate classic allergy from everything else, then use specifics for other reactions�beyond IgE there are many other mechanisms of chemoactive consequences from food sensitivity of one form or another. Those books from Brostoff help a bit�though the second is a might heavy for lay people. __________________________________________�There are no specific tests for them, only double-blinded challenges. Intolerances appear to be relatively rare too, however.� ___________________________________________This is quite misleading, as if one looks at the literature as a whole as regards non-IgE mediated loss of oral tolerance, there is a notable frequency in the overall population of the U.S. at this time. While it is not a pandemic, neither is it a rare problem. Many people can be shown to have some degree of lost oral tolerance via one or more mechanisms, manifesting itself through one or more specific symptom sets.It is very difficult to arrive at the actual number since it is an area that no one has done such a single broad investigation of�to quantify the frequency in mixed-population of the symptomatic and symptom free.Almost anyone can throw any number out there an claim it to be �the answer� and anyone who does at this time almost assuredly is wrong�it is not rare yet it is not a pandemic�.it is somewhere in between�and the issue is quite moot as is dancing angels on the head of a pin. What is germane is isolating the person who has symptomology which is elicited by lost oral tolerance of one mechanism or another, to one food or chemical or another or more, as opposed to some other pathology and modifying diet to ablate the symptoms.To this end there are technology and lifestyle solutions now available and in use which can and do accomplish this. To suggest otherwise is to merely reflect a lack on information.MNL
 

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quote:flux, i'm sorry to say this, but i have personal evidence that you may not be not correct in this. i have noticed problems with all of the food that i tested postive to. some were after the fact, true. but, i have a food diary going back six months to look through. i tend to be a non-believer by nature, so the only proof for me will be when i feel better. but, there is sufficient evidence to suggest that these are, in fact, problem foods for me. i am willing to take a chance and see what happens.
i have the same type of proof. i kept a food diary off and on for 5 years and the evidence is unmistakeable.i have suspected that the ELISA test had it's shortcomings. i do plan on having the MRT test done soon, in fact, a jan p. called recently to go over the test.carrie, actually i think food intolerances do indeed have an immune factor involved. they are finding immune factors in the feces of foods that cause "intolerance". my knowledge on this is limited though.
 

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quote: but it seems to me that an intolerance to something, sets the body into a reaction, rejecting that item. It would make sense that it could possibly cause malabsorption to a degree
that is exactly what seems to be happening to me. the only thing is that over the years my body is rejecting more and more things. of course, my doctor thinks that is due to the "leaky gut syndrome". however, when i eat something bad, it is like i have a live animal running around my guts. then i start getting all kinds of symptoms like light-headedness, cognitive dysfunction, etc. also, it completely throws off my bowel activity. like when i ate the cheese last friday night. i was having good bowel function but then the cheese caused my brain and colon to go into some type of serious reaction.
 
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