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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know if something like this has been posted here yet.I would really be careful going to Mexico to get the drug, they can throw you in jail there for no reason really except transferring drugs across the border. You still need a prescription and you had better have that in triple on you when you try to bring it across, just fyi it is very serious and you never know what drug they may take a disliking too. Being in a Mexican jail with IBS would be a nightmare big time. I would really find out the laws on this and then still be careful if someone attemps it. Just fyi.------------------Moderator of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety and Hypnotherapy forumI work with Mike and the IBS Audio Program. www.ibshealth.com www.ibsaudioprogram.com
 

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Eric, You are technically absolutely correct, but I don't think Mexico is after prescription drug takers, but big time drug dealers. Maybe someone can give some practical guidance here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This is from the state department. It has more to do with bringing them in and some of the laws still apply to bringing them out, but I just watched a 48 hours not to long ago and a nightline on this and a guy went in bought valium and some other lesser drugs and was just thrown in jail when he went to cross the border. He bought it over the counter in Mexico and thought he didn't need a prescription, when in fact he did. I don't want to scare anyone, but this really needs to be look into before you do it. American laws do not apply in Mexico and there judicial system is nothing like ours when it come to this. Zelmac may or may not be an issue really and it maybe okay with the prescription and all, but its a drug your taking across a border with two countries in a major drug war. "DRUG AND FIREARMS OFFENSES Most Central and South American countries strictly enforce laws against the use, possession and sale of narcotics. Foreigners arrested for possession of even small amounts of narcotics are generally charged and tried as international traffickers. There is no bail, judicial delays are lengthy, and you can spend 2 to 4 years in prison awaiting trial and sentencing. If you carry prescription drugs, keep them in their original container, clearly labeled with the doctors name, pharmacy and contents. Check with the embassy of the country you plan to visit for specific customs requirements for prescription drugs."------------------Moderator of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety and Hypnotherapy forumI work with Mike and the IBS Audio Program. www.ibshealth.com www.ibsaudioprogram.com
 

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See http://www.fda.gov/ora/import/pipinfo.htm This site discusses how to legally import drugs that are NOT available for sale in the US.Once a drug is approved in the US you are supposed to buy it in the US as then the FDA can insure you get a quality drug.Now I don't know if it would still be possible or not, but I think it meets the serious condition for which thre isn't a US-approved treatment type of thing. You will most likely have to find a doctor who will supervise it, but it sounds like it could be done. And I assume that customs could snag it from you whether you are shipping it or carrying it in if your trying to do it outside of the legal guidelines for bringing drugs into the country.Besides, it may help put pressure on the FDA if they get hundreds of applications for the importation of Zelnorm. Make the case that it is needed.However, I think that having someone who lives near Mexico go and get it for you and give it to you could get you in serious trouble. This is for your personal use ONLY. Giving or selling it to others is drug trafficing.Can you see the news report now...When they capture a Zelnorm smuggling ring. (Instead of Hell No We Won't Go the chant is Hell Yes We Want to Go!!)K.------------------I have no financial, academic, or any other stake in any commercial product mentioned by me.My story and what worked for me in greatly easing my IBS: http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/Forum17/HTML/000015.html [This message has been edited by kmottus (edited 07-26-2001).]
 

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Kmottus, Thanks for the link. I think the chances of getting thrown into a Mexican jail for attempting to bring Zelmac into the U.S. are slim, not impossible, but just not probable. I agree, I don't think it is a good idea to have a friend visiting Mexico pick some up for you. If you go to Mexico and declare that you have some prescription drugs for your personal use (3 months supply). I don't know why U.S. customs would do more than seize the supply. Why would they throw someone in jail? You haven't lied to them or tried to deceive them.
 

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Eric, Valium is considered a controlled drug in Mexico, which may be why the person got thrown in jail. I can't imagine Zelmac being considered a controlled substance. Does anyone know how Zelmac is classified?
 

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haha, thanks for the morning laugh K
I totally agree with your point that we ALL should petition the FDA for permission to import Zelnorm
I would love to find out the classification of it as well! I think in a few months a lot of this will be all clarified for us then we can decide if we want to go there and get it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I only want to make the point to know the laws in regards to this, if you have ever seen a Mexican jail to say it is really bad is an understatement.There is also a lot of corruption there and Americans are a target.I know the Valium is a controlled substance, but the guy bringing it in thought it was okay, because it was sold over the counter there. The other drugs he had you would not have thought were a big deal, but they were.I really hope there will be a way, or even better they approve it here.------------------Moderator of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety and Hypnotherapy forumI work with Mike and the IBS Audio Program. www.ibshealth.com www.ibsaudioprogram.com
 

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Thanks, Eric, it is important to know the laws and Mexican jails are among the worst. Thanks for bringing that to our attention. We don't have too many options at present, so it's a bit discouraging.
 

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I live in San Diego and the drug issue is in the news quite a bit here. From everything I have heard and seen, US Customs is completely uninterested in enforcing drug law in this kind of case. If they suspect you of drug running, on the other hand, they will take your car apart bolt by bolt and you will be summarily strip searched. But this isn't done arbitrarily. As for the Mexican authorities, they are an unknown. Most of the cases of Americans being thrown into Mexican jail or being railroaded by the police involve traffic accidents. They also occur more frequently outside of Tijuana. I have acquired medications (though not in the last few years) with and without a prescription. And I know people who do it all the time. If you have IBS like mine, you may feel compelled to take the risk.[This message has been edited by badfoot (edited 07-27-2001).]
 

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Badfoot, I'm in s.CA as well
have you popped across the border recently to get anything? It's been about 7 years or so since I went to TJ for anything...we use to walk over and get a taxi..but the border seems soooooo busy now..was thinking of possibly heading for Calexico if it looks safe to do when Zelnorm is there...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I don't know the exact date this was written which could be important. It doesn't have to much on the law end specifically but some interesting information here.There are 2 parts and calling a mexican pharmacy. One thing is for sure you can't have it mailed. http://www.peoplesguide.com/1pages/chapts/.../cheapmed1.html ------------------Moderator of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety and Hypnotherapy forumI work with Mike and the IBS Audio Program. www.ibshealth.com www.ibsaudioprogram.com
 

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Just popped in to see what was happening since Zelnorm was released in Mexico. My own personal experience while residing 32 years in So. CA was completely positive. I had a home about 2.5 hours south of Tijuana, across the bay from Ensenada and constantly brought prescription items across. I showed them to the U.S. Border Guard and was ALWAYS waved through. Even when I was young and nubile.
IF you are detained it is on the U.S. side of the border. Mexican jails become a possibility if you are trying to take something INTO Mexico. U.S. jails are the destination when trying to take something OUT. That was my experience.Here is what the US Customs website has to say today: The U.S. Customs Service enforces Federal laws and regulations, including those of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A new bill was recently passed by Congress that amends a portion of the Controlled Substances Act (21USC956(a)). This amendment allows a United States resident to import up to 50 dosage units of a controlled medication without a valid prescription at an international land border. These medications must be declared upon arrival, be for your own personal use and in their original container. However, travelers should be aware that drug products which are not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration may not be acceptable for such importation. FDA warns that such drugs are often of unknown quality and discourages buying drugs sold in foreign countries. Please go to http://www.fda.gov/ora/import/purchasing_medications.htm for further information. The United States Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. sections 331(d), and 355(a)), which is administered by FDA, prohibits the interstate shipment (which includes importation) of unapproved new drugs. Unapproved new drugs are any drugs, including foreign-made versions of U.S. approved drugs, that have not received FDA approval to demonstrate they meet the federal requirements for safety and effectiveness. It is the importer's obligation to demonstrate to FDA that any drugs offered for importation have been approved by FDA. FDA has developed guidance entitled "Coverage of Personal Importations" which sets forth that agency's enforcement priorities with respect to the personal importation of unapproved new drugs by individuals for their personal use. The guidance identifies circumstances in which FDA may consider exercising enforcement discretion and refrain from taking legal action against illegally imported drugs. Those circumstances are as follows: 1. the intended use (of the drug) is unapproved and for a serious condition for which effective treatment may not be available domestically either through commercial or clinical means; 2. there is no known commercialization or promotion to persons residing in the U.S. by those involved in the distribution of the product at issue; 3. the product is considered not to represent an unreasonable risk; 4. the individual seeking to import the product affirms in writing that it is for the patient�s own use (generally not more than a 3-month supply) and provides the name and address of the doctor licensed in the U.S. responsible for his or her treatment with the product, or provides evidence that the product is for the continuation of a treatment begun in a foreign country. FDA's guidance is not, however, a license for individuals to import unapproved (and therefore illegal) drugs for personal use into the U.S. Even if all of the factors noted in the guidance are present, the drugs remain illegal and FDA may decide that such drugs should be refused entry or seized. The guidance represents FDA�s current thinking regarding the issues of personal importation and is intended only to provide operating guidance for FDA personnel. The guidance does not create any legally enforceable rights for the public; nor does it operate to bind FDA or the public. For additional info at this site go to http://www.customs.gov/travel/travel.htm IN ADDITION....Mail ordering from Mexico (or any other country)is also 'legal' provided it's for your personal use. On the off chance an over zealous Customs Agent [because the application of these laws are open for interpretation, deliberately]seizes your shipment, you're out the cost of the meds and you will receive a letter notifying you of the seizure. Nobody knocking at your door in the middle of the night with an arrest warrant. In my experience.
------------------Verna Eileen Radcliffe(without laughter there is no future) http://homepages.about.com/eileenradcliffe...eileenradcliffe (stop in and say hello sometime
) http://petitiononline.com/LOTRONEX/petition.html (1,305 signatures now, have your friends and relatives signed?)Genuine AllExperts Expert Check out my bio/ratings page! http://www.allexperts.com/displayExpert.asp?Expert=36364 [This message has been edited by VernaEileenR (edited 07-30-2001).][This message has been edited by VernaEileenR (edited 07-31-2001).]
 
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