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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Yo, Newforme, Charlie and others who posted to my recent questions re: GB surgery. I saw the GI surgeon today and my HIDA CCK result was only 2%! He feels it needs to come out. He spent about 30 minutes with me answering many questions. I am having the surgery on Mon. 8/14. He is planning on doing via laporoscopy.Yo, what did your doctor say today. I hope you are feeling good about your appointment. Wishing you all good health. Hope
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hi Hope38, yeah same with my surgeon. I asked him, because I don't have the severity of symptoms yet and problems as others with dysfunctional gall bladder, if he felt it should come out. He said I could wait till I did have problems, but then I might be sorry. I definitely have it working at 17%, I can't imagine yours working lower. Plus, because mine is affecting my pancrease due to the Amylase level in blood test, if I wait I could develop pancreatis and really be in trouble (which is what my doc said). I decided I probably don't have a choice and have talked to MANY others I know who have had no problems afterwards. This is a situation I am going to leave in God's hands and base decision on what we feel I need to do. Scarey though. (PS, he also said the majority of time, gall bladder is reason for Amylase elevated. If not solved afterwards, then other in depth tests for pancrease needed. But it is definitely not working as should, so it's the first step, oh well!) Surfery scheduled for Aug. 28. PLEASE LET ME KNOW HOW SURGERY GOES, PRAYING FOR YOU!
 

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My surgery was painless. I went in and when I got to my room I was so bored that I ended up walking around to other patients rooms just to chat. The surgery will be easy and little tiny scares too. Let us know how you do, maybe if it is early enough you can go home the same day. Stay away from fatty foods the first two week though!!!!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My surgery went great, too! Good luck to ya'll and hope that you will be feeling much better soon!
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Yo and Newforme, I really felt good about my appointment today. Yo, it sounds like you are doing the right thing too. You can't risk your pancreas. I have also talked to several people who have done really well afterwards.Newforme, you seem to echo what the surgeon said, probably will be bored the day after and ready to go home. The only reason he is keeping me overnight is due to my asthma and other previous surgery related complications.( I am allergic to a lot of meds). Other than that it seems pretty simple. Wishing you both well and will definitely post after my surgery. Thanks so much. Take care. Hope
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
THANKS TO ALL OF YOU WHO HAVE REPLIED TO HOPE38 AND ME!! I do feel better after reading your responses, and am glad that many others have had good experiences. I will await to hear from you after you are home and rested, Hope. I have it on my calendar to pray for you that day. Then, I will touch base after mine. Mine is at 1:00 in the afternoon. Wonder if I get to go home same day. This site has been wonderful for me to be able to communicate with others, it's amazing!!!! THANKSOOPS! Have to be at hospital at 1:00 p.m., surgery is scheduled for 3:00 p.m. I'm gonna be starving!!!![This message has been edited by yo (edited 08-09-2000).]
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just another who had the laparoscopic gb removal (over two years ago, now).It was a breeze. Some slight discomfort afterwards (the usual anxiety before), and that was about it. The discomfort was no worse than a bothersome little ache here and there - and I'm a guy anyway, and we're supposed to be wimps when it comes to pain, so it probably isn't even bothersome for gals.You'll both (Hope and Yo) do fine.BJ
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good luck to both of you on your GB surgery's. As I posted on your other thread, I had my gallbladder removed on July 24th. All went well and I have had no problems so far other than a bit of constipation (this is from the meds - Tylenol #3's). I only have 4 tiny little scars on my tummy. I had my surgery about 9 am and was home by 7 pm the same day. I would of been home earlier but they want you to pee before they let you go and as luck would have it I developed a urinary tract infection and was having a hard time going. Word of caution...this may not be true to all hospitals or doctors but I was given a big dose of ANTIBOTICS before the surgery (I asked and they said some will give this before and some during or after). Find out and be careful if they do this. My IBS-D started a year ago from antibotics. I take acidolphus now and have pretty much 95% normal life. If you find they are going to give you antibotics have a good acidolphus ready to take for about 10 days afterwards to restore all the good stuff in your system, just to be safe.Good luck and keep us posted!HJ
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi, I had surgery about 5 wks ago. No more pain, no discomfort. My only complaint is that my appetite has been poor. I get full easily and am not excited by any food (not ice cream, pizza)... nothing. I hope this goes away. Good luck... it seems like many people completely recover w/ no problems.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks to all of you who have responded. I don't know how Hope is doing, but I am still freaked. Not about the surgery, but possible problems after removal. My situation is; even though gallbladder is working at 17%, I do not have serious, or seem like any symptoms, like all others I have read about. I would not have gone to doc to find out what's wrong, it was all begun from blood test results. I do get a very uncomfortable pressure-like pain on right side in the last month or so. Will my symptoms progressively get worse as time goes on if not removed? I'm afraid that I'll have worse problems after. Made appt. to talk to doc about concerns. Seems like many of you are doing fine. I'm glad.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi yo,You have every reason to be freaked! I was too. It took me about 9 months to get my IBS-D under control and I was scared that it would all start again. I have not had any problems since the surgery and feel lucky for that.I asked the surgeon and my Dr. the same questions you are having concerns about and I did a lot of research on the subject. What I found out didn't make the decision to have the gallbladder removed any easier. My main reason for having it taken out is we want to have another baby and I didn't want to have problems during what will be an already high risk pregnancy.Anyway, I was told that I had three options. One was surgery, two was a pill that would disolve stones - this could take anywhere from six months to two years and you had to have the liver tested every three months and the third was to wait, watch and see what happens. I would suggest to you to get on the net and do some searching of your own. There is alot of good informational sites to go to. A good search engine is www.google.com. Good luck in your quest for answers.Regards,HJ
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks HJ, will look up some more. Have appt. with my Doc to discuss all this stuff on Monday Aug 21. Surgery has been scheduled for Monday Aug 28 if I decide to go through with it. I feel pretty good, have some tired days a lot. Unless anything comes up between now and then, will update on appt with doc and/or surgery.Also, trusting in God for wisdom and His plan. See ya!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
To all of those who posted -- Thank you. You have truly been kind, informative and generous in sharing your own experiences. I am definitely going to line up some acidophilus (sp?) for post op.Yo, I hope you get your questions answered to your satisfaction. I really have to say for me I feel much better about my decision after doing a lot of research and spending about 30+ minutes with a really good GI surgeon. I know some people have bad results but if the gallbladder is truly bad (as indicated by HIDA) it seems like it is just a matter of time until it HAS to come out. I will also keep you in my thoughts and prayers. Please let me know how you are doing.Wishing you all good health. Hope
 

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LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY (GALLBLADDER) The gallbladder functions to store bile for the digestion of fats. Gallstones are formed due to an imbalance in the bile fluid in the gallbladder, causing solidification of sediment formation. These stones move around and when they block ducts they cause symptoms. Symptoms that may occur after eating a fatty meal caused by "gallstones", include pain in the right upper abdomen or shoulders, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and indigestion. Removal of the gallbladder is done to correct the symptoms caused by "gallstones". The Minimally Invasive Surgery procedure to remove the gallbladder (laparoscopic cholecystectomy) is done through a laparoscope. A laparoscope is a tiny "telescope" attached to a camera that allows your doctor to see inside your body while performing surgery. Instead of the traditional incision, laparoscopic surgery requires only 3 or 4 tiny (1/2 inch) incisions that allow the laparoscope and surgical instruments to be inserted. Using special instruments, the surgeon removes the gallbladder. Open Gallbladder Incision Laparoscopic Gallbladder Incisions This procedure has many benefits. Please note the following table: Laparoscopic Open Hospital Stay Same or 1 day 3-7 days Activities of Daily Living 1-2 weeks 4-6 weeks Cosmetic Results 3-4 tiny incisions 6-9 inch scar Post-Operative Pain Minimal Significant
 

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Information from Your Family Doctor Gallbladder Removal: Laparoscopic Method --------------------------------------------------------------------------------How is the gallbladder removed? The surgery to remove the gallbladder is called a cholecystectomy (say "chol-e-cys-tec-to-my"). With traditional surgery, the gallbladder is removed through a 5- to 8-inch long incision (cut) in your abdomen. The cut is made just below your ribs on the right side and goes to just below your waist. This is called open cholecystectomy. A newer way to remove the gallbladder is called laparoscopic cholecystectomy. With this surgery, a laparoscope (a small, thin tube with a scope on the tip of it that is used to see the inside of your body) is used to remove the gallbladder. Several small incisions are used rather than one large incision. How is a laparoscope used to remove the gallbladder? The laparoscope is put into your body through a tiny cut made just below your navel. Your doctor can then see your gallbladder on a TV screen and do the surgery with tools inserted in 3 other small cuts made in the right upper part of your abdomen. Your gallbladder is then taken out through one of the incisions. What are the benefits of this type of surgery? With laparoscopic cholecystectomy, you may return to work more quickly, have less pain after surgery, have a shorter hospital stay, and have a shorter recovery time. Unlike traditional surgery, laparoscopic surgery to remove the gallbladder can be done without cutting the muscles of your abdomen. The incision is also much smaller, which makes the recovery quicker. With laparoscopic cholecystectomy, you probably will only have to stay in the hospital overnight. With open cholecystectomy, you would need to stay in the hospital for about 5 days. Because the incisions are smaller with laparoscopic cholecystectomy, there isn't as much pain after this operation as after open cholecystectomy. Who shouldn't have this type of surgery? If you had surgery in the area of your gallbladder before, if you tend to bleed a lot, or if you have any problem that would make it hard for your doctor to see your gallbladder, an open surgery may be better for you. Your doctor will decide which type of surgery is appropriate for you.What are the complications? Complications are rare but may include bleeding, infection and injury to the duct (tube) that carries bile from your gallbladder to your stomach. Also, during laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the intestines or major blood vessels may be injured when the instruments are inserted into the abdomen. Remember, all of these complications are rare. (Rev. February 2000)--------------------------------------------------------------------------------This handout provides a general overview on this topic and may not apply to everyone. To find out if this handout applies to you and to get more information on this subject, talk to your family doctor. Visit familydoctor.org for information on this and many other health-related topics.Copyright � 2000 by the American Academy of Family Physicians. Permission is granted to print and photocopy this material for nonprofit educational uses. Written permission is required for all other uses, including electronic uses.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Home Page | Handouts Search | Browse | Return to Previous Page --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hi Hope and others, I am doing fine, in fact very well. It's weird that I don't have any symptoms like many others. I also bought some of that bread that others mentioned on this BB. I really like it. I won't have any new info probably till after I meet with my Doc on Aug 21. You more than likely won't get this till after your surgery. By what others have said, I'm sure you will feel better.Charlie, thanks for all of your info, pictures, funnies, etc!!!!
 

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Diet after gall bladder surgery is very important. There are a number of foods to avoid after gallbladder removal, the most important being red meat, which is high in difficult to digest animal protein and animal fat. Also minimize pork, poultry, dairy, chocolate, and refined carbohydrates. Choose foods without hydrogenated or trans fats - this means no margarine, and few processed foods. Fried foods, spicy foods, and soft drinks should be taken out of the diet after gallbladder surgery altogether.A diet after gall bladder surgery should include fruits and vegetables, with raw, fresh, organic foods being the most beneficial. Eat plenty of avocados, beets, cucumbers, sweet potatoes, grapes, apples, berries, and artichokes. They will provide fiber, which the body needs to aid in digestion and help cleanse, as well as the nutrients that the body needs to restore itself after gallbladder removal surgery. Other beneficial foods to eat after a cholecystectomy are yogurt, fish, and cottage cheese. As time passes after the surgery, start introducing whole grains, eggs, and some poultry and low-fat milk.Good luck
 
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