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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
  1. Is everything on that chart with the green light edible by IBSers? Or do we need to cross-check all of that to see if they're gluten free as well?
  2. Also, when they say 1/2 cup etc, is that per meal or per day?

That being said, I got these from the Monash University app and was wondering if anyone had bad experiences with these foods that are listed under their "GREEN LIGHT".

  • Peanuts
  • Aubergine
  • Cabbage, common
  • Eggplant
  • Okra
  • Tomato, common
  • Chana Dahl (pluses)
  • Urid Dahl (pulses)

I'd REALLY appreciate any help, coz I've been stuck with just 5 kinds of foods since the past few months and really wanna get some more nutrition into my body. :(
 

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Everything with a green light is good for FODMAP, however you could still react to something with a green light if your body has developed an intolerance to something. The servings are per meal, not per day. I believe it is best to have meals at least 3 hours apart on the FODMAP diet, but you can check that.

If you have been following FODMAP for awhile and not finding improvement then that may not be the right diet for you. Though it helps many people, it does not help everyone. It improved my symptoms a little for a short time but never enough to even try to add foods back in my diet to see if they were effecting me.

Also, read this about how long foods can take to trigger. We are acoostomed to blaming the food we just ate, but it may be something you ate several hours ago, or even yesterday. https://irritablebowelsyndrome.net/living/fodmaps-trigger-ibs-symptoms/

Other diets you can try are the Candida diet with anti-fungals, and the SCD diet. (.http://www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info/home/) Some people have also reported success with a ketosis diet. The Candida diet, followed by SCD has made a huge difference for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Everything with a green light is good for FODMAP, however you could still react to something with a green light if your body has developed an intolerance to something. The servings are per meal, not per day. I believe it is best to have meals at least 3 hours apart on the FODMAP diet, but you can check that.

If you have been following FODMAP for awhile and not finding improvement then that may not be the right diet for you. Though it helps many people, it does not help everyone. It improved my symptoms a little for a short time but never enough to even try to add foods back in my diet to see if they were effecting me.

Also, read this about how long foods can take to trigger. We are acoostomed to blaming the food we just ate, but it may be something you ate several hours ago, or even yesterday. https://irritablebowelsyndrome.net/living/fodmaps-trigger-ibs-symptoms/

Other diets you can try are the Candida diet with anti-fungals, and the SCD diet. (.http://www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info/home/) Some people have also reported success with a ketosis diet. The Candida diet, followed by SCD has made a huge difference for me.
Thanks a lot, Rboe. Had no idea about those other diet plans.

I haven't really had a chance to add much to my low fodmap diet. LowFodmap has helped and keeps me symptom free (IBS-C) on most days. There might be a day or two with cramps after a BM and I'm still on my medication too, sot it might be a little early to switch diets.

I guess I'll keep adding things and see how it goes.
 

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Also, low-fodmap isn't gluten free. Many gluten containing foods are excluded due to their carb composition.

Sourdough bread, slow leavened, is allowed as well small amounts of other wheat products. Still you could exclude gluten while

in the elimination phase to see if it's something you are sensitive to.

Food triggers can be very individual. Oatmeal causes me considerable pain for several days even though it is a low-fodmap food.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
"Also, low-fodmap isn't gluten free."

This confuses me. To keep my IBS symptoms at bay, shouldn't I be gluten-free? I mean, it has suited me and all. So, what's better, low-fodmap or just being gluten-free?
 

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You have to experiment and find out for yourself. Don't follow any diet just because it says do this or that. You have to determine if you can comfortably eat EVERY SINGLE FOOD. The fodmap diet is just a starting point for a list of foods that may be safest to experiment with.
 

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Hello.
In my opinion, stop seeing this diet. Have food diary of what's accepting to your body and not accepting. Based on that create your own diet.every body is different depends on environment and tolerance.
In the diet list I see that peanuts and dhal produce gas in the stomach. This tends to create bloating and body pains. If you are having this food daily.
 

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Hi Stevieo, the o in the word fodmap are called oligosaccharides which include fructans is. Wheat,rye,barley,onion family foods, some fruits and nuts to name some. So it is the wheat which needs to be avoided. To eat foods with no wheat,rye,barley we need to buy gluten free. It's not the gluten which causes the problem as gluten is not part of the fodmap foods.
I found I can eat some wheat without it causing problems. You need to find out how much of the foods you can eat. Everyone is different. Some people can't eat any of the fodmap foods and just stay on "low" fodmap ones or they just stay on the elimination diet but then people may not be getting enough vitamins/minerals and it isn't known what happens long term so it is advised to try to put as many foods as you can tolerate back in.
 
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