Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Health Support Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found you all by doing some research on the web about IBS. As a child I always had loose stools. I was diagnosed in my early 20's as having colitis attacks. Sometimes the pain would be so severe I would spend the night wrapped around the toilet on the floor, that was the only way I could find any relief. Now I am in my 40's, and absolutely everything I eat goes straight through me. It could be dry toast or one cracker, and I am in the bathroom. I saw my doctor today...I thought i may have an ovarian cyst, because my pain worsened when my period started. He says he believes I have IBS, gave me a precription for Levsin/SL, and Vicodin to help control the pain. He is going to have a scope done of my colon, and of my esophogus and stomach. I was surprised to read that symptoms can worsen during monthly cycle. I had no idea. I guess my question for you all is this...If I am having chronic diarrhea, how will increasing my fiber and water intake help that? Will the fiber harden up the stools? Appreciate your understanding and input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Hi, Marion,this can be complicated stuff. Not everyone responds the same to fiber or different diets. IBS tends to ease up at night, so if you sleep in the bathroom, there is a possibility that you have something else going on - could be an inflammatory disorder that affects the integrity of the intestines or stomach. The tests your doctor wants may answer that question. With IBS, there is no apparent change in the intestines or stomach physically, but they are hyperactive. Another condition that may keep a person up through the night is dietary intolerance to lactose or fructose or the sugar alcohols (xylitol, sorbitol, etc). Especially if the offending substance is eaten with the evening meal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Hi, Marion,this can be complicated stuff. Not everyone responds the same to fiber or different diets. IBS tends to ease up at night, so if you sleep in the bathroom, there is a possibility that you have something else going on - could be an inflammatory disorder that affects the integrity of the intestines or stomach. The tests your doctor wants may answer that question. With IBS, there is no apparent change in the intestines or stomach physically, but they are hyperactive. Another condition that may keep a person up through the night is dietary intolerance to lactose or fructose or the sugar alcohols (xylitol, sorbitol, etc). Especially if the offending substance is eaten with the evening meal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,821 Posts
Hey Marion, I'm "D" and high dosing fiber helped me out quite a bit. Also taking fiber as well as probiotics is supposed to be very helpful--the 2 work synergistically. I have great luck with metamucil, but others prefer citrucel, etc.Here's some fiber info from ...com~"Yes, a soluble fiber supplement should be extremely helpful for IBS. Soluble fiber is the key to preventing the abdominal spasms and bowel dysfunction of IBS, and this is just as true for supplements as it is for soluble fiber foods. Remember, soluble fiber works by absorbing liquids in the digestive tract to form a stabilizing gel that relieves cramping and prevents both diarrhea and constipation. Clinical studies with IBS patients have repeatedly proven the benefits of soluble fiber supplements.However - in order for soluble fiber supplements to work, you have to take a high enough dose, and many people don't. It's particularly easy to take too little of a supplement that's in tablet form, as most soluble fiber pills and capsules have only 1/2 gram of fiber. In comparison, most powder supplements contain 2-4 grams of soluble fiber per dose. Ideally, you'll gradually work up to a soluble fiber supplement dosage of 12-15 grams per day, though you may also stabilize at a lower dose. Remember that different people have varying tolerances and adjustment periods to soluble fiber supplements; this means that it can take from several days to two weeks or longer for your body to adjust to the increased fiber intake. Your symptoms should NOT dramatically worsen during this introductory period, and you may well see immediate improvement, but if you don't notice any difference the first day or two have patience. Soluble fiber may be the single greatest aid for controlling IBS symptoms you'll ever find, so give it a fair chance. Best of all, soluble fiber supplements can be taken daily forever with no harmful side effects or risk of addiction. In fact, they have health benefits far beyond managing IBS, as soluble fiber has been shown to lower LDL ("bad") blood cholesterol levels, reduce the risk of heart disease, and minimize colon cancer risks. Soluble fiber also slows the absorption of fats and carbohydrates into the bloodstream, which improves glycemic control and helps prevent the formation of free radicals. It also lowers insulin requirements. " ../news/newsletter/banpanc031004.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,821 Posts
Hey Marion, I'm "D" and high dosing fiber helped me out quite a bit. Also taking fiber as well as probiotics is supposed to be very helpful--the 2 work synergistically. I have great luck with metamucil, but others prefer citrucel, etc.Here's some fiber info from ...com~"Yes, a soluble fiber supplement should be extremely helpful for IBS. Soluble fiber is the key to preventing the abdominal spasms and bowel dysfunction of IBS, and this is just as true for supplements as it is for soluble fiber foods. Remember, soluble fiber works by absorbing liquids in the digestive tract to form a stabilizing gel that relieves cramping and prevents both diarrhea and constipation. Clinical studies with IBS patients have repeatedly proven the benefits of soluble fiber supplements.However - in order for soluble fiber supplements to work, you have to take a high enough dose, and many people don't. It's particularly easy to take too little of a supplement that's in tablet form, as most soluble fiber pills and capsules have only 1/2 gram of fiber. In comparison, most powder supplements contain 2-4 grams of soluble fiber per dose. Ideally, you'll gradually work up to a soluble fiber supplement dosage of 12-15 grams per day, though you may also stabilize at a lower dose. Remember that different people have varying tolerances and adjustment periods to soluble fiber supplements; this means that it can take from several days to two weeks or longer for your body to adjust to the increased fiber intake. Your symptoms should NOT dramatically worsen during this introductory period, and you may well see immediate improvement, but if you don't notice any difference the first day or two have patience. Soluble fiber may be the single greatest aid for controlling IBS symptoms you'll ever find, so give it a fair chance. Best of all, soluble fiber supplements can be taken daily forever with no harmful side effects or risk of addiction. In fact, they have health benefits far beyond managing IBS, as soluble fiber has been shown to lower LDL ("bad") blood cholesterol levels, reduce the risk of heart disease, and minimize colon cancer risks. Soluble fiber also slows the absorption of fats and carbohydrates into the bloodstream, which improves glycemic control and helps prevent the formation of free radicals. It also lowers insulin requirements. " ../news/newsletter/banpanc031004.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Hi Marion!I have IBS and quite a bit of 'D' too. Please, please please try to drink plenty of water, especially when your D is bad (I dont know if it has to be water, I tend to drink diluted cordials as they're virtually all water anyway). When we have D, we lose so much water, salts and sugars. D used to (I don't know if it still is) a major killer of children is less privilaged countries- simply because they lost so much water/salts. I'm sorry if this sounds scary, I'm not trying to scare you. Let me emphasise that these are extreme cases, and that such children are usually in places like Africa, where there is an extremely hot and dry climate and water is scarce anyway. It's really very rare for people to die of de-hydration these days. However, the message is still the same... our bodies cannot survive without plenty of water. If you're losing it through D, you have to replace it.As for fibre... increasing my soluble fibre intake really helped me... things like rice Krispies, potatoes, carrots... other root veggies tend to be good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Hi Marion!I have IBS and quite a bit of 'D' too. Please, please please try to drink plenty of water, especially when your D is bad (I dont know if it has to be water, I tend to drink diluted cordials as they're virtually all water anyway). When we have D, we lose so much water, salts and sugars. D used to (I don't know if it still is) a major killer of children is less privilaged countries- simply because they lost so much water/salts. I'm sorry if this sounds scary, I'm not trying to scare you. Let me emphasise that these are extreme cases, and that such children are usually in places like Africa, where there is an extremely hot and dry climate and water is scarce anyway. It's really very rare for people to die of de-hydration these days. However, the message is still the same... our bodies cannot survive without plenty of water. If you're losing it through D, you have to replace it.As for fibre... increasing my soluble fibre intake really helped me... things like rice Krispies, potatoes, carrots... other root veggies tend to be good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for your responses. I am taking to heart all that you have said, and lots of things I have been reading in other posts. Since starting the Levsin on Monday, I am finding that I am not going to the bathroom as much as I was. However, when i do, it is still D. I didnt eat after breakfast on Monday, until dinner last night. But as soon as I ate within 15 minutes I was in the bathroom. I have noticed that the Levsin seems to have cleared up my sinus drainage, and frequent urination as well. I still have pain in my side, but it isnt as severe or intense as it was before the med. I had the Barium done and the upper and lower GI's in my twenties, and they diagnosed me then with a spastic colon. I had horrible attacks that landed me in the Emergency room. My last bad attack was 10 years ago when I was pregnant with my son. Since then I havent had any horrible attacks. I have always had a D problem, but have just lived with it. I changed my diet and dont eat alot of dairy, fats, etc... I dont drink Tea, or very much soda. Usually when I do it is caffiene free and diet. My downfall is that I live on coffee. I will be glad to get the scopes done, and make sure, for my own peace of mind there is nothing else going on. Thanks again to you all for your help and responses. But most of all for understanding!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all for your responses. I am taking to heart all that you have said, and lots of things I have been reading in other posts. Since starting the Levsin on Monday, I am finding that I am not going to the bathroom as much as I was. However, when i do, it is still D. I didnt eat after breakfast on Monday, until dinner last night. But as soon as I ate within 15 minutes I was in the bathroom. I have noticed that the Levsin seems to have cleared up my sinus drainage, and frequent urination as well. I still have pain in my side, but it isnt as severe or intense as it was before the med. I had the Barium done and the upper and lower GI's in my twenties, and they diagnosed me then with a spastic colon. I had horrible attacks that landed me in the Emergency room. My last bad attack was 10 years ago when I was pregnant with my son. Since then I havent had any horrible attacks. I have always had a D problem, but have just lived with it. I changed my diet and dont eat alot of dairy, fats, etc... I dont drink Tea, or very much soda. Usually when I do it is caffiene free and diet. My downfall is that I live on coffee. I will be glad to get the scopes done, and make sure, for my own peace of mind there is nothing else going on. Thanks again to you all for your help and responses. But most of all for understanding!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
I am very surprized he prescribed Vicodin for the pain, narcotics are usally not indicated for IBS. Long term use can actually make IBS pain worse and lower pain threshols in the gut, which are already sensitive. Long term use can also cause something called narcotic bowel syndrome.I would be concerned about this if you are taking them everyday or often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
I am very surprized he prescribed Vicodin for the pain, narcotics are usally not indicated for IBS. Long term use can actually make IBS pain worse and lower pain threshols in the gut, which are already sensitive. Long term use can also cause something called narcotic bowel syndrome.I would be concerned about this if you are taking them everyday or often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
FYITreatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome DRUGS & NATURAL REMDIES by William B. Salt II, M.D. and Neil F. Neimark, M.D.Jailwala, Imperiale and Kroenke have written a review of scientific studies published up to the year 2000 on drug treatment of IBS (Annals of Internal Medicine, 2000;133:136�147). These researchers concluded the following: The Science of Medical Treatment for IBS "Narcotic. Narcotic analgesic drugs are usually not prescribed for continuous treatment because of possible development of physical dependency or addiction and unwanted side effects, such as drowsiness and interference with clear thinking. Furthermore, continuous narcotic use can actually increase pain sensitivity and also alter gut motility, leading to severe constipation. This is called the �narcotic bowel syndrome� (Annals of Internal Medicine, 1984;101:331�334). Keeping these cautions in mind, narcotic analgesic drugs are occasionally used to relieve intermittent attacks of more severe pain. ""Ann Intern Med. 1984 Sep;101(3):331-4. Related Articles, Links Narcotic bowel syndrome treated with clonidine. Resolution of abdominal pain and intestinal pseudo-obstruction.Sandgren JE, McPhee MS, Greenberger NJ.We describe the cases of five patients having a syndrome of chronic abdominal pain, vomiting, weight loss, and features of intestinal pseudo-obstruction associated with prolonged use or abuse of narcotic analgesics. In each patient, abdominal complaints were originally attributed to either mechanical bowel obstruction or an underlying gastrointestinal disorder often involving prior abdominal surgery. Symptoms resolved rapidly in all patients when narcotic administration was stopped. Clonidine therapy was used to alleviate symptoms of narcotic analgesic withdrawal. The narcotic bowel syndrome is a clinically important and frequently unrecognized cause of chronic abdominal pain.Publication Types: Case ReportsPMID: 6147108there is another functional gi disorder chronic functional abnominal pain. That shares some aspects of IBS.Chronic Functional Abdominal Pain"It is important to realize that narcotics are not indicated -- and can even be harmful and need to be avoided -- in treating chronic abdominal pain. Over long periods of time, narcotics may produce more pain causing a condition called "Narcotic Bowel Syndrome." http://www.med.unc.edu/wrkunits/2depts/med.../fgidc/cfap.htm http://www.aboutibs.org/Publications/CFAP.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
FYITreatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome DRUGS & NATURAL REMDIES by William B. Salt II, M.D. and Neil F. Neimark, M.D.Jailwala, Imperiale and Kroenke have written a review of scientific studies published up to the year 2000 on drug treatment of IBS (Annals of Internal Medicine, 2000;133:136�147). These researchers concluded the following: The Science of Medical Treatment for IBS "Narcotic. Narcotic analgesic drugs are usually not prescribed for continuous treatment because of possible development of physical dependency or addiction and unwanted side effects, such as drowsiness and interference with clear thinking. Furthermore, continuous narcotic use can actually increase pain sensitivity and also alter gut motility, leading to severe constipation. This is called the �narcotic bowel syndrome� (Annals of Internal Medicine, 1984;101:331�334). Keeping these cautions in mind, narcotic analgesic drugs are occasionally used to relieve intermittent attacks of more severe pain. ""Ann Intern Med. 1984 Sep;101(3):331-4. Related Articles, Links Narcotic bowel syndrome treated with clonidine. Resolution of abdominal pain and intestinal pseudo-obstruction.Sandgren JE, McPhee MS, Greenberger NJ.We describe the cases of five patients having a syndrome of chronic abdominal pain, vomiting, weight loss, and features of intestinal pseudo-obstruction associated with prolonged use or abuse of narcotic analgesics. In each patient, abdominal complaints were originally attributed to either mechanical bowel obstruction or an underlying gastrointestinal disorder often involving prior abdominal surgery. Symptoms resolved rapidly in all patients when narcotic administration was stopped. Clonidine therapy was used to alleviate symptoms of narcotic analgesic withdrawal. The narcotic bowel syndrome is a clinically important and frequently unrecognized cause of chronic abdominal pain.Publication Types: Case ReportsPMID: 6147108there is another functional gi disorder chronic functional abnominal pain. That shares some aspects of IBS.Chronic Functional Abdominal Pain"It is important to realize that narcotics are not indicated -- and can even be harmful and need to be avoided -- in treating chronic abdominal pain. Over long periods of time, narcotics may produce more pain causing a condition called "Narcotic Bowel Syndrome." http://www.med.unc.edu/wrkunits/2depts/med.../fgidc/cfap.htm http://www.aboutibs.org/Publications/CFAP.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Eric, Thanks so much for the information. I am not one that normally takes pain pills. I usually just fight the pain, and find other means to try and cope with it. Doctor gave me a script for 60 vicodins 500mg, and I have only taken 1/2 a pill since i got them. I would rather try non narcotics, as I know people who are addicted to vicodin and other such drugs, and It scares me. I think he felt sorry for me cause i was in so much pain. Anyway, thanks for the heads up. Not to worry here....wont take them unless I am left with no other recourse.I am busily checking out all the links that you guys have sent me.thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Eric, Thanks so much for the information. I am not one that normally takes pain pills. I usually just fight the pain, and find other means to try and cope with it. Doctor gave me a script for 60 vicodins 500mg, and I have only taken 1/2 a pill since i got them. I would rather try non narcotics, as I know people who are addicted to vicodin and other such drugs, and It scares me. I think he felt sorry for me cause i was in so much pain. Anyway, thanks for the heads up. Not to worry here....wont take them unless I am left with no other recourse.I am busily checking out all the links that you guys have sent me.thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,908 Posts
Hi-I first started taking fiber (2 fibercon/day)for IBS D. I questioned that this would help but it did. It didnt happen over night but in time my poops became almost normal and D was less D like. Its good that you are going for scopes, just to rule out something inflammatory. Also in my experience the down side of the fiber is that I produce more poop. I was really bad when I was pregnant too, good to hear someone else was too( I dont feel that alone and wierd), most IBS people are actually better during pregnancy. Levsin/bentyl/antispasmodics didn't help me but everyone is different glad they help you some what. I never found much relief from narcotics for IBS pain. Antidepressants in low doses though not perfect or a magic pill help some with IBS pain. Hope this helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,908 Posts
Hi-I first started taking fiber (2 fibercon/day)for IBS D. I questioned that this would help but it did. It didnt happen over night but in time my poops became almost normal and D was less D like. Its good that you are going for scopes, just to rule out something inflammatory. Also in my experience the down side of the fiber is that I produce more poop. I was really bad when I was pregnant too, good to hear someone else was too( I dont feel that alone and wierd), most IBS people are actually better during pregnancy. Levsin/bentyl/antispasmodics didn't help me but everyone is different glad they help you some what. I never found much relief from narcotics for IBS pain. Antidepressants in low doses though not perfect or a magic pill help some with IBS pain. Hope this helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Marion, part of the pain problem in IBS is because the brain is not processing pain signals from the gut right. As nancy mention antidepressants can help at low doeses, because part of the issues here is the gut stores the majority of the bodies serotonin and serotonin, is majorally implicated in IBS and the gut uses it to signal up nerve fibers to the brain. This is basically not working right. You should read this though on pain in general and all pain is processed in the brain.IBS is a physcial problem, but a big part of the problem seems to be brain gut communications.However this is really worth reading on pain in general first.Mind-Body-Pain Connection: How Does It Work?By Michael Henry JosephWebMD Live Events Transcript Archive Reviewed By Event Date: 05/11/2000.Moderator: Welcome to WebMD Live's World Watch and Health News Auditorium. Today we are discussing "The Mind-Body-Pain Connection: How Does It Work?" with Brenda Bursch, Ph.D., Michael Joseph, M.D., and Lonnie Zeltzer, M.D.Brenda Bursch, Ph.D., is the Associate Director of the Pediatric Pain Program, Co-Director of Pediatric Chronic Pain Clinical Service and Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA Department of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine. She has written about asthma, developmental & behavioral pediatrics, emergency medicine, AIDS education and prevention, chronic digestive diseases and pediatric bowel disorders. She has membership in the American Pain Society, American Psychological Association, Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy Network, and the UCLA Center for the Study of Organizational and Group Dynamics. Michael Henry Joseph, MD, is an assistant professor of pediatrics and co-director of Chronic Pain Services at the University of California at Los Angeles Children's Hospital. He is a recipient of the Golden Apple Award for Excellence in Teaching. Lonnie Zeltzer, M.D., is an expert in the field of pediatric pain. She is a former president of the Society for Adolescent Medicine and member of the National Institute of Health?s Human Development Study Section. She is currently a Professor of Pediatrics and Anesthesiology at the UCLA School of Medicine. She is Director of the UCLA Pediatric Pain Program and Associate Director of the Patients & Survivors Section, Cancer Prevention and Control Research Branch of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. She has well over one hundred scientific publications, reviews and chapters in medical journals, and has lectured internationally. Moderator: Doctors, welcome back to WebMD Live. http://my.webmd.com/content/article/1/1700...vent%20Archives This is also worth reading.Gut Feelings: The Mind-Body Connection http://www.ahealthyadvantage.com/topic/mindbodygut
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Marion, part of the pain problem in IBS is because the brain is not processing pain signals from the gut right. As nancy mention antidepressants can help at low doeses, because part of the issues here is the gut stores the majority of the bodies serotonin and serotonin, is majorally implicated in IBS and the gut uses it to signal up nerve fibers to the brain. This is basically not working right. You should read this though on pain in general and all pain is processed in the brain.IBS is a physcial problem, but a big part of the problem seems to be brain gut communications.However this is really worth reading on pain in general first.Mind-Body-Pain Connection: How Does It Work?By Michael Henry JosephWebMD Live Events Transcript Archive Reviewed By Event Date: 05/11/2000.Moderator: Welcome to WebMD Live's World Watch and Health News Auditorium. Today we are discussing "The Mind-Body-Pain Connection: How Does It Work?" with Brenda Bursch, Ph.D., Michael Joseph, M.D., and Lonnie Zeltzer, M.D.Brenda Bursch, Ph.D., is the Associate Director of the Pediatric Pain Program, Co-Director of Pediatric Chronic Pain Clinical Service and Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA Department of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine. She has written about asthma, developmental & behavioral pediatrics, emergency medicine, AIDS education and prevention, chronic digestive diseases and pediatric bowel disorders. She has membership in the American Pain Society, American Psychological Association, Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy Network, and the UCLA Center for the Study of Organizational and Group Dynamics. Michael Henry Joseph, MD, is an assistant professor of pediatrics and co-director of Chronic Pain Services at the University of California at Los Angeles Children's Hospital. He is a recipient of the Golden Apple Award for Excellence in Teaching. Lonnie Zeltzer, M.D., is an expert in the field of pediatric pain. She is a former president of the Society for Adolescent Medicine and member of the National Institute of Health?s Human Development Study Section. She is currently a Professor of Pediatrics and Anesthesiology at the UCLA School of Medicine. She is Director of the UCLA Pediatric Pain Program and Associate Director of the Patients & Survivors Section, Cancer Prevention and Control Research Branch of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. She has well over one hundred scientific publications, reviews and chapters in medical journals, and has lectured internationally. Moderator: Doctors, welcome back to WebMD Live. http://my.webmd.com/content/article/1/1700...vent%20Archives This is also worth reading.Gut Feelings: The Mind-Body Connection http://www.ahealthyadvantage.com/topic/mindbodygut
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top