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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had a craving for honey lately. I can't remember if it aggravated my IBS (I have IBS-D) - and for some reason I'm thinking it is used as some kind of natural rememdy for the digestive system. Don't want it to be a natural laxative or something though. Anyone know anything about honey? Thanks!------------------Rebecca"Knowledge is Power"
 
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i don't know any official facts on honey - but I'm hoping it isn't bad - i just had a pasta salad with honey and mustard sauce.And am feeling a bit funny in the tummy since...probably not the honey though - i also had an apple which is sometimes bad for me (bad girl!!!)I hope someone can give you the answers!
 

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Honey is a tricky one. It can behave similarly to any sugar terms of increasing motility. And, of course, like any sugar it could be a culprit if that fermentation theory of IBS holds any water at all.Now, there are legends that it can actually help treat the big 'D" and ulcers, but I haven't seen how this could work.I've found that a little now & then works for me, but if I have too much, it makes me worse. I'm a believer in this fermentation theory, and I think that's why I get that result. Honey doesn't ferment as quickly as some other sugar combos, but like any sugar...it will given the opportunity.
 
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Hi Rebecca,I am sensitive to sorbitol and fructose and I can't eat honey. I get a ton of pain and gas and some D. I can't remember if honey is high in sorbitol but that can bother almost anyone. I'll have to look honey up in my IBS book. Apples have a lot of sorbitol as do pears. Jackie
 
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Becjo,Honey may well have a laxative effect, due to its high fructose content. See the abstract below.--------------------------------------------Am J Clin Nutr 1995 Dec;62(6):1212-5 Honey may have a laxative effect on normal subjects because of incomplete fructose absorption.Ladas SD, Haritos DN, Raptis SASecond Department of Internal Medicine-Propedeutic, Athens University, Evengelismos Hospital, Greece. Honey contains fructose in excess of glucose, which may lead to incomplete fructose absorption associated with abdominal symptoms and/or diarrhea. This hypothesis was investigated in 20 healthy volunteers (13 males, 7 females) with a mean (+/- SD) age of 35.9 +/- 12.1 y. Each subject drank the following aqueous solutions in random order: 20 g lactulose, 100 g honey, 50 g honey, and 35 g each of a glucose and fructose mixture. The breath-hydrogen concentration was measured every 15 min for 6 h. Semiquantitative estimates of carbohydrate malabsorption were assessed with lactose as a nonabsorbable standard. Breath-hydrogen concentrations increased by 52 +/- 6, 30 +/- 4, 20 +/- 3, and 4 +/- 1 ppm (mean +/- SEM) after each of the four test solutions, respectively. The estimated carbohydrate malabsorption was 10.3 +/- 1.8, 5.9 +/- 1.2, and 0.5 +/- 0.2 g after 100 g honey, 50 g honey, and the glucose-fructose mixture, respectively (F[2,57] = 16.05, P < 0.001). Within 10 h after the ingestion of 100 g honey, 50 g honey, and the glucose-fructose mixture, six, three and none of the volunteers, respectively, reported loose stools (chi 2 = 7.1, df = 2, P < 0.03). The results of this study suggest that carbohydrate malabsorption after ordinary doses of honey is frequent in healthy adults and may be associated with abdominal complaints. Honey may have a laxative effect in certain otherwise healthy individuals, probably because of incomplete fructose absorption.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everyone - I thought honey had something natural in it. I guess I'll just live with the craving. Ain't worth all the other stuff
------------------Rebecca"Knowledge is Power"
 

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Keep in mind though, that it might not be something to avoid like the plague. In my case, for example, it is better for me to have bread that contains honey than corn syrup. Yet I shouldn't spread a bunch of honey all over that slice of bread either.
 
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Like stated above, I dont think you have to avoid it all together. I am also D type and I do have a little honey in my tea or on toast and it doesnt seem to bother me at all. Also, to stop your craving, maybe you should treat yourself to a honey snack before bedtime rather than right before your going out somewhere.Good luckDorisD
 
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Hi ouch, With all my fructose and sorbitol problems, natural maple syrup doesn't have either and I have had no problem with it. I just make sure I buy real maple syrup, not the commercial kinds with a bunch of stuff like corn syrup in it. Hope this helps. Jackie
 

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Hi guys!I just wanted to mention that I too have problems with honey (I believe it is feeding my bacterial imbalance- since I get incredible rumblings/bloating after eating it). With that in mind, I found out that there is a type of honey that is supposed to have anti-bacterial effects. It is called "manuka" honey, their website is www.manukahoney.co.nz and you can order from them. This is a raw type of honey and they claim it can actually help with IBS. I have ordered a jar just to try it and will let you know if I tolerate this well- but thought I would just mention it for those of you who don't want to give up 'a little honey in your life'! Take care.
 
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