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I have IBS, and although it is not that bad, I would like to explore other options for working. I have heard some people on this board talk about working from home in the past. What types of things can you do by working at home? Can you make a decent salary? Right now I am a teacher, so I have a college degree, plus I am going to be getting my master's in about a year or so. I am also wondering about this for when I have kids, which my husband and I plan to do in like 4 or 5 years from now. Any input would be greatly appreciated. By the way I live in the NYC area.
 

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I do home child care. It works great for me, and I've been doing this for 1 1/2 years. (I used to work for a group daycare for 9 years before this) Being at home is so much more comfortable than being with co workers, and having to commute each day. The kids are very accepting, and something about being home makes me feel more relaxed right off the bat. (And I have nobody to ask if it's alright if I take a bathroom trip, I just make the trip whenever I have to and the children do well. I just use my extra hearing, and sometimes leave the door open)
 

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I do home child care. It works great for me, and I've been doing this for 1 1/2 years. (I used to work for a group daycare for 9 years before this) Being at home is so much more comfortable than being with co workers, and having to commute each day. The kids are very accepting, and something about being home makes me feel more relaxed right off the bat. (And I have nobody to ask if it's alright if I take a bathroom trip, I just make the trip whenever I have to and the children do well. I just use my extra hearing, and sometimes leave the door open)
 

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MissBonnie, Here's one idea I heard about recently. Virtual Assistants are people who work online via the Internet. They provide services to small and large businesses, including word processing, desktop publishing, Internet research, and data entry. They can do most office tasks. They often advertise their services and keep updating their skills. You can find out more by visiting Web sites such as those of the International Virtual Assistants organization, which also offers the IVAA Certified Virtual Assistant (CVA) examination, one of several endorsed standards for VAs. A virtual course in the field is available at Virtual Assistance U, which also provides a few online minicourses, some free. Two other organizations have allied with Virtual Assistance U, the International Association of Virtual Office Assistants and AVirtualSolution. They offer Virtual Assistant Certification. Other sites covering VAs are Staffcentrix, which recruits and hires VAs; and A Virtual Assistants NetRing. This is just one suggestion because you can also telecommute directly for some companies. The online job boards can be searched for telecommuting jobs too. Good luck and hope you're feeling pretty well.
 

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MissBonnie, Here's one idea I heard about recently. Virtual Assistants are people who work online via the Internet. They provide services to small and large businesses, including word processing, desktop publishing, Internet research, and data entry. They can do most office tasks. They often advertise their services and keep updating their skills. You can find out more by visiting Web sites such as those of the International Virtual Assistants organization, which also offers the IVAA Certified Virtual Assistant (CVA) examination, one of several endorsed standards for VAs. A virtual course in the field is available at Virtual Assistance U, which also provides a few online minicourses, some free. Two other organizations have allied with Virtual Assistance U, the International Association of Virtual Office Assistants and AVirtualSolution. They offer Virtual Assistant Certification. Other sites covering VAs are Staffcentrix, which recruits and hires VAs; and A Virtual Assistants NetRing. This is just one suggestion because you can also telecommute directly for some companies. The online job boards can be searched for telecommuting jobs too. Good luck and hope you're feeling pretty well.
 

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I usually work at home. I am a writer, editor, and video producer/director -- so I can do this pretty easily. Between professions that lend themselves to freelance work and my commitment to establish myself so I could freelance, which predated IBS by decades, it's really not that hard.For folks who are, say, teachers or bus drivers, I imagine this luxury is not so accessible. I don't have any trouble focusing or meeting deadlines. In fact, it's easier when I can work in my PJs, four feet away from the bathroom and two feet from my supply of clean underwear!
 

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I usually work at home. I am a writer, editor, and video producer/director -- so I can do this pretty easily. Between professions that lend themselves to freelance work and my commitment to establish myself so I could freelance, which predated IBS by decades, it's really not that hard.For folks who are, say, teachers or bus drivers, I imagine this luxury is not so accessible. I don't have any trouble focusing or meeting deadlines. In fact, it's easier when I can work in my PJs, four feet away from the bathroom and two feet from my supply of clean underwear!
 

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I'm also a writer/editor, for a trade magazine. I work about 15 hours a week at home, and check into the office on Mondays and Thursdays for two hours. In my case, this situation evolved from a full-time, in-office job, thanks to a boss who was understanding when I started getting ill. (I also like to think that I would have been somewhat hard to replace!) I also do some free-lance editing, much of it for graduate students. (I don't write term papers or theses, but I will polish them up.) I ghost-wrote a book, and have done edits/rewrites on others. At one time, I was a test rater for fire and sheriff's department promotional exams. When I work at home, I adhere to a schedule, just as I would at an office. I set a goal every day for what work needs to be completed. And, yes, my work uniform is usually a bathrobe! As a teacher, missbonnie, a lot of at-home opportunities should be available to you. One that comes to mind is after-school tutoring of children. I imagine you could also be successful as an freelance writer/editor. Other at-home jobs I have heard of are: data entry, medical billing, resume preparation, telephone solicitation, craft assembly, transcription and computer consulting. However, many home jobs that are advertised, such as envelope-stuffing--ones that claim they will hire you--are bogus. For the most part, you more or less have to establish your own business, including advertising your services, finding clients, billing and any necessary licenses and tax obligations. You also give up benefits such as health and disability insurance and sick leave.It's not always easy, but if you have kids and/or IBS, it can be worth it.
 

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I'm also a writer/editor, for a trade magazine. I work about 15 hours a week at home, and check into the office on Mondays and Thursdays for two hours. In my case, this situation evolved from a full-time, in-office job, thanks to a boss who was understanding when I started getting ill. (I also like to think that I would have been somewhat hard to replace!) I also do some free-lance editing, much of it for graduate students. (I don't write term papers or theses, but I will polish them up.) I ghost-wrote a book, and have done edits/rewrites on others. At one time, I was a test rater for fire and sheriff's department promotional exams. When I work at home, I adhere to a schedule, just as I would at an office. I set a goal every day for what work needs to be completed. And, yes, my work uniform is usually a bathrobe! As a teacher, missbonnie, a lot of at-home opportunities should be available to you. One that comes to mind is after-school tutoring of children. I imagine you could also be successful as an freelance writer/editor. Other at-home jobs I have heard of are: data entry, medical billing, resume preparation, telephone solicitation, craft assembly, transcription and computer consulting. However, many home jobs that are advertised, such as envelope-stuffing--ones that claim they will hire you--are bogus. For the most part, you more or less have to establish your own business, including advertising your services, finding clients, billing and any necessary licenses and tax obligations. You also give up benefits such as health and disability insurance and sick leave.It's not always easy, but if you have kids and/or IBS, it can be worth it.
 
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