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I often get told I am a stressed out person.I have gotten IBS to a point where I am much better, 70%, but not completely sealed.I notice even with this reduced, I still have a lot of anxiety and stress.This makes me think, since with diet and supplements I have been able to reduce IBS that stress and anxiety do not play a big role, because despite the IBS being improved, I still have a lot of stress and anxiety, or, despite having a lot of stress and anxiety, I have gotten it to be less of a flare.I would like at this moment to also announce I am now in therapy, I believe it is cognitive, thanks.
 

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Sometimes, stress plays a roll.. sometimes it doesn't; it is all a very individual thing.I just woke up at 5:15am; I was not "stressed" about anything, but am overcoming some intense pain and D.Basically I guess I said that because it's different for everyone. Some people are really affected by stress, and some aren't. Stress, in general, is a bad thing, and most people try to avoid it as much as possible.I applaud you seeking help and finding a therapist; I hope he/she continues to help you on to a road of 100% improvement, I sincerely do.Good luck Volatile.
 

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I think it can for some people. Personally I don't think stress plays much of a role for me. I can be feeling perfectly calm and not worrying about anything and get a huge attack. But there are many people on these boards who report that during times of stress their IBS can flare up.
 

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How often are you feeling perfectly calm?Stess can also have a delayed reaction.It can also be anxiety and even emotions. People with mild IBS usally aren't as susceptible as people with moderate and severe IBS. IBS alone can be enough to stress the system both physically and mentally."The Neurobiology of Stress and EmotionsBy: Emeran A. Mayer, M.D., UCLA Mind Body Collaborative Research Center, UCLA School of Medicine, California We often hear the term "stress" associated with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Many patients experience a worsening of symptoms during times of severely stressful life events. But what is stress? How often does it occur? How does our body respond to stress? This article explores the mechanisms that link stress and emotions to responses that have evolved to ensure survival and that, in the modern world, affect healthâ€"including gastrointestinal function. "http://www.aboutibs.org/Publications/stress.htmlFrom the UNC chat with the experts"psychophysiological arousal is the core of treating functional gi disorders. There is so much distress, anxiety, antisipatory anxiety, and negative reaction to symptoms, that calming the mind and body often makes a significant difference to symptoms."
 
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