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If you run across hypnotherapy studies post them here please. Also, please do not post comments here but on the topics so we can reserve this for just studies. ThanksGut 1987 Apr;28(4):423-5 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut Hypnotherapy in severe irritable bowel syndrome: further experience. Whorwell PJ, Prior A, Colgan SM Fifteen patients with severe intractable irritable bowel syndrome previously reported as successfully treated with hypnotherapy, have now been followed up for a mean duration of 18 months. All patients remain in remission although two have experienced a single relapse overcome by an additional session of hypnotherapy. Experience with a further 35 patients is reported giving a total group of 50. This group was divided into classical cases, atypical cases and cases exhibiting significant psychopathology. The response rates were 95%, 43%, and 60% respectively. Patients over the age of 50 years responded very poorly (25%) whereas those below the age of 50 with classical irritable bowel syndrome exhibited a 100% response rate. This study confirms the successful effect of hypnotherapy in a larger series of patients with irritable bowel syndrome and defines some subgroup variations. PMID: 3583070, UI: 87220014 Lancet 1989 Feb 25;1(8635):424-5 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut Individual and group hypnotherapy in treatment of refractory irritable bowel syndrome. Harvey RF, Hinton RA, Gunary RM, Barry RE Gastroenterology Unit, Frenchay Hospital, Bristol. 33 patients with refractory irritable bowel syndrome were treated with four 40-minute sessions of hypnotherapy over 7 weeks. 20 improved, 11 of whom lost almost all their symptoms. Short-term improvement was maintained for 3 months without further formal treatment. Hypnotherapy in groups of up to 8 patients was as effective as individual therapy. Publication Types: Clinical trial Randomized controlled trial PMID: 2563797, UI: 89142812Gut 1990 Aug;31(8):896-8 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut Changes in rectal sensitivity after hypnotherapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Prior A, Colgan SM, Whorwell PJ Department of Medicine, University Hospital of South Manchester. Fifteen patients with the irritable bowel syndrome were studied to assess the effect of hypnotherapy on anorectal physiology. In comparison with a control group of 15 patients who received no hypnotherapy significant changes in rectal sensitivity were found in patients with diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome both after a course of hypnotherapy and during a session of hypnosis (p less than 0.05). Although patient numbers were small, a trend towards normalisation of rectal sensitivity was also observed in patients with constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. No changes in rectal compliance or distension-induced motor activity occurred in either subgroup nor were any changes in somatic pain thresholds observed. The results suggest that symptomatic improvement in irritable bowel syndrome after hypnotherapy may in part be due to changes in visceral sensitivity. PMID: 2387513, UI: 90353800 Br J Hosp Med 1991 Jan;45(1):27-9 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut Use of hypnotherapy in gastrointestinal disease. Whorwell PJ University Hospital of South Manchester, West Didsbury. Recent controlled studies in the field of gastroenterology have shown that hypnotherapy is unequivocally beneficial in conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and peptic ulceration. There is also some evidence for influence on certain physiological functions. Further research should help to define more clearly the role of this controversial form of therapy. Publication Types: Clinical trial Randomized controlled trial PMID: 2009436, UI: 91183314 : Gastroenterol Clin North Am 1991 Jun;20(2):325-33 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut Treatment of the irritable bowel syndrome. Friedman G Department of Medicine, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York. Individualization of treatment for patients with IBS is predicated on a thorough analysis of the patient's symptoms, consideration of the reasons for seeking health care, evaluation of symptom-precipitating factors, elimination of confounding features, and the absolute knowledge of the absence of organic illness. Collecting and codifying appropriate historical data allow the physician to educate the patient with respect to the origin of his symptoms, and to enlist the patient as a partner in his future health care. There is no single, universally accepted therapeutic agent available for the treatment of the IBS patient. As a result, treatment is directed at reducing the frequency and intensity of triggering factors as well as ameliorating the symptoms when they arise. Symptoms evoked by psychologic factors may be effectively reduced by psychotherapy or hypnotherapy. Situational anxiety may be treated for brief periods by using antianxiety agents such as diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, buspirone, or similar agents. Depressive reactions may be reduced with suitable doses of antidepressant agents such as amitriptyline. Smooth muscle hyperreactivity may be dulled with small amounts of selected anticholinergics, which are usually most effective in reducing meal-induced discomfort. Peppermint oil may be of additional benefit. Gas-related symptoms require elimination of contributory dietary factors, such as lactose-containing foods, sorbitol, or fructose, as well as certain oligosaccharides. Simethecone, charcoal, or beanase may be helpful. Functional constipation is best treated with graded doses of insoluble or soluble fiber. Diarrheal episodes may be reduced with either loperamide or diphenoxylate. Careful, continued follow-up assessment of therapeutic endeavors, a sincere interest in the patient's concerns, and surveillance for intercurrent organic illness are the cornerstones of complete ongoing care. Publication Types: Review Review, tutorial PMID: 2066156, UI: 91293865
 

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Here are some which deal with hypnotherapy and flatulence among other thingsTiTle: Hypnotherapy in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: methods and results in Amsterdam. Author: Vidakovic-Vukic M Source Scand J Gastroenterol Suppl, 230(): 49-51 1999 Service Fee: $10.75 ; Copyright Royalties: Unknown Abstract: BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is frequently observed, but its etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. However, it is clear that individual perception plays an important part in pathogenesis (hypersensitive, hyperreactive gut). There is no easy medical treatment of IBS. However, in recent years, hypnotherapy (HT) has been shown to be successful in the treatment of IBS. METHODS: Recently we started treating IBS patients using hypnotherapy. All our patients remained symptomatic, despite medical therapy. We applied the gut-targeted method, adding to it the view that the therapy should be tailored to the individual, in accordance with each person's unique representational style. RESULTS: So far, 27 patients have been treated, with good results, comparable to results elsewhere. Of these patients two stopped the therapy prematurely, and one remained symptomatic. All other patients experienced clear improvement: pain and flatulence was reduced or completely disappeared, and bowel habits normalized. CONCLUSION: Based on data from the literature and supported by our own experience, we conclude that hypnotherapy is a valuable addition to the conventional treatment of IBS. To improve our knowledge of sensitivity to hypnotherapy, further research is necessary to recognize cases with more hypersensitivity and those dominated by hypervigilance. More generally, we need a theoretical model of hypnotherapy as applied to treating physiological disorders. TiTle: The treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with hypnotherapy. Author: Galovski TE , Blanchard EB Source Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback, 23(4): 219-32 1998 Dec Service Fee: $10.75 ; Copyright Royalties: $19.80 Abstract: Previous research from the United Kingdom has shown hypnotherapy to be effective in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The current study provides a systematic replication of this work in the United States. Six matched pairs of IBS patients were randomly assigned to either a gut-directed hypnotherapy (n = 6) or to a symptom monitoring wait-list control condition (n = 6) in a multiple baseline across subjects design. Those assigned to the control condition were later crossed over to the treatment condition. Subjects were matched on concurrent psychiatric diagnoses, susceptibility to hypnosis, and various demographic features. On a composite measure of primary IBS symptoms, treatment was superior (p = .016) to symptom monitoring. Results from the entire treated sample (n = 11; one subject was removed from analysis) indicate that the individual symptoms of abdominal pain, constipation, and flatulence improved significantly. State and trait anxiety scores were also seen to decrease significantly. Results at the 2-month follow-up point indicated good maintenance of treatment gains. No significant correlation was found between initial susceptibility to hypnosis and treatment gain. A positive relationship was found between the incidence of psychiatric diagnosis and overall level of improvement.
 
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eric and others. Blanchard's book has a 20 pages bibliography on treatments, including hypnosis, an anlysis of the reasearch and sample protocols. may be pretty heavy going but worth looking into. I'm going to try to write a 'popular' review and will post it when done.tom
 
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