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Greetings all,I also posted thi son the CBT / Anxiety BB but thought I would ask my friends on this BB as well.I was just wondering how many of us have feelings of Hypochondria? I was diagnosed with GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder) 8 years ago. Most of my anxiety however is centered around physical symptoms. It�s always hard for me to tell if I�m feeling a certain way because of anxiety or I have anxiety because of the way I am feeling. Sort of like the chick and the egg.Luckily for me these periods of anxiety come and go over time. I will have it for 4-6 months then it will go away for years. I�m in a period right now. Started back in late May. For fun (really to make myself feel better), earlier this week, I made a list of all the physical things I have worried about since then. It was a full page�can you believe it?�.in just 3 months�.a FULL page�TYPED!!!!Anyway� I was just curious if any others around here feel the same way.HAPPY WEEKEND!Karl
 

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Karl, I know for a fact that I am a hypochondriac! I am a worried wreck all of the time and I always think I am going to die of some fatal disease. It is a horrible way to live but I think that the fact that both of my parents passed away at very young ages I fear the same fate.I know that I am driving my husband crazy but he is pretty good about it. There are some people who will never ever go to a doctor....not me! I am always going for some reason or another thinking that I am on my way out! So what do we do? Maybe some ant-anxiety meds would be good.
 

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Karl, I know for a fact that I am a hypochondriac! I am a worried wreck all of the time and I always think I am going to die of some fatal disease. It is a horrible way to live but I think that the fact that both of my parents passed away at very young ages I fear the same fate.I know that I am driving my husband crazy but he is pretty good about it. There are some people who will never ever go to a doctor....not me! I am always going for some reason or another thinking that I am on my way out! So what do we do? Maybe some ant-anxiety meds would be good.
 

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as i said "if worry were money, i'd be a millionaire." I saw my dad die a horrible death and am afraid of that same thing. sister almost died too. Maybe that's why I'm the way I am. Who knows, bad situation at work and home, feeling nobody gives a **** about me, etc. etc., It's enough to cause a lot of grief. So if I don't worry about myself nobody else is going to.. rats, sorry to sound so negative.
 

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as i said "if worry were money, i'd be a millionaire." I saw my dad die a horrible death and am afraid of that same thing. sister almost died too. Maybe that's why I'm the way I am. Who knows, bad situation at work and home, feeling nobody gives a **** about me, etc. etc., It's enough to cause a lot of grief. So if I don't worry about myself nobody else is going to.. rats, sorry to sound so negative.
 

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Boy Karl, we could probably talk for hours about our ailments. My doctor actually put a name to it, he calls it a somatization disorder. Every little thing that happens to my body is treated as a "symptom" to me. I get a shooting pain in my head and think "Oh my God, I'm having an aneurysm!" I have back pain from something domestic mishap and automatically think I have cancer and it's metastasized! Over the years I have learned to "talk myself down" from this states of panic. I just say to myself, "now wait, think about this... yesterday you thought you had cancer, today you think you have MS, the likelihood of one of this is probably not high, but the likelihood of both..." Unfortunately my dad was this way, his anxiety always stemmed from a physical symptom. And of course, I have the absolute "WORST" job I could have for this. I am a medical transcriptionist. I'll be typing a report about someone with a disease and if I have just one of the symptoms I'll have myself buried by the end of the report. I'll have periods where I'll go to the doctor quiet frequently, insisting they've missed something, and then kind of calm down for a while. My husband thinks I'm just plain nuts, well maybe just a little, at least I can joke about it....
 

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Boy Karl, we could probably talk for hours about our ailments. My doctor actually put a name to it, he calls it a somatization disorder. Every little thing that happens to my body is treated as a "symptom" to me. I get a shooting pain in my head and think "Oh my God, I'm having an aneurysm!" I have back pain from something domestic mishap and automatically think I have cancer and it's metastasized! Over the years I have learned to "talk myself down" from this states of panic. I just say to myself, "now wait, think about this... yesterday you thought you had cancer, today you think you have MS, the likelihood of one of this is probably not high, but the likelihood of both..." Unfortunately my dad was this way, his anxiety always stemmed from a physical symptom. And of course, I have the absolute "WORST" job I could have for this. I am a medical transcriptionist. I'll be typing a report about someone with a disease and if I have just one of the symptoms I'll have myself buried by the end of the report. I'll have periods where I'll go to the doctor quiet frequently, insisting they've missed something, and then kind of calm down for a while. My husband thinks I'm just plain nuts, well maybe just a little, at least I can joke about it....
 

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To all here, if you take a nice strong dose of benzo meds your problems will stop, your brain will be in a fog, and your life will be ruined. That's how a lot of folks cope but you know better because you're not already one of them. It is pure hell to get off of benzos once you're addicted, been there done that! You can be helped greatly with mind therapies, "relaxation" which is hypnosis(Mike's tapes are great) or CBT will give you some peace. One book that I purchased several years ago helped greatly. It was recommended by some on this BB and once you have a full understanding and method to follow, you can stop worrying and playing "mind" games. The book is "The Feeling Good Handbook" written by David D.Burns MD. As the title suggests, it is a handbook with information about why we do things(such as worry) and a method to practice stopping the bad habits. It has worked great for me and others. Good luck, Norb
 

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To all here, if you take a nice strong dose of benzo meds your problems will stop, your brain will be in a fog, and your life will be ruined. That's how a lot of folks cope but you know better because you're not already one of them. It is pure hell to get off of benzos once you're addicted, been there done that! You can be helped greatly with mind therapies, "relaxation" which is hypnosis(Mike's tapes are great) or CBT will give you some peace. One book that I purchased several years ago helped greatly. It was recommended by some on this BB and once you have a full understanding and method to follow, you can stop worrying and playing "mind" games. The book is "The Feeling Good Handbook" written by David D.Burns MD. As the title suggests, it is a handbook with information about why we do things(such as worry) and a method to practice stopping the bad habits. It has worked great for me and others. Good luck, Norb
 

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Thought I was the only one to feel like this! It's nice to talk about this stuff knowing that people aren't tutting and raising their eyebrows! (like my husband does) I too go through really bad patches where I feel I can't live life normally, I'm just a mess of symptoms. I don't even want to do a "proper" job- you know, where you HAVE to turn up and people rely on you. If I'm feeling ill the night before I'm going "oh my God, I'll never make it through the day tomorrow. I'll throw up, pass out etc. I'm not so worried about thinking it's serious, just spending my life feeling ill and people saying it's nothing. Thanks for this thread, I feel better already!
 

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Thought I was the only one to feel like this! It's nice to talk about this stuff knowing that people aren't tutting and raising their eyebrows! (like my husband does) I too go through really bad patches where I feel I can't live life normally, I'm just a mess of symptoms. I don't even want to do a "proper" job- you know, where you HAVE to turn up and people rely on you. If I'm feeling ill the night before I'm going "oh my God, I'll never make it through the day tomorrow. I'll throw up, pass out etc. I'm not so worried about thinking it's serious, just spending my life feeling ill and people saying it's nothing. Thanks for this thread, I feel better already!
 

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Boy can I relate to this! I'm only 35 but I feel like I'm 135! I have Crohn's with IBS and I really think that I have fibromyalgia (undiagnosed) to go with it. The symptoms from all 3 make for almost no days without some sort of aches, pains or bowel problems! My child is always told "not now honey, mama doesn't feel well". I too would be a millionaire if "every worry was worth a dollar"!
 

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Boy can I relate to this! I'm only 35 but I feel like I'm 135! I have Crohn's with IBS and I really think that I have fibromyalgia (undiagnosed) to go with it. The symptoms from all 3 make for almost no days without some sort of aches, pains or bowel problems! My child is always told "not now honey, mama doesn't feel well". I too would be a millionaire if "every worry was worth a dollar"!
 

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My GI doc says that most IBSers aer not hypochodriacs in the literal meaning of the word (people who make themselves sick because they believe we are sick). She says, however, that we are usually "hyperaware" of our physical selves - and so any symptoms get blown all out of proportion. Maybe this is why mind-body techniques like hypnosis or yoga work so well for many of us?------------------JennT
 

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My GI doc says that most IBSers aer not hypochodriacs in the literal meaning of the word (people who make themselves sick because they believe we are sick). She says, however, that we are usually "hyperaware" of our physical selves - and so any symptoms get blown all out of proportion. Maybe this is why mind-body techniques like hypnosis or yoga work so well for many of us?------------------JennT
 

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I'm with JennT on this one. The vast majority of IBSers aren't hypochondriacs. And because stress is a universal trigger for IBS, our anxieties about IBS can actually make an attack worse. So it seems only natural that yoga, hypnosis, deep breathing meditation, and other forms of relaxation help IBS (not cure--help) by preventing our minds from making a bad situation worse.The hypersensitivity comment is interesting because it is supported by medical research. In clinical trials, IBS sufferers tended to feel bowel discomfort more quickly than non-IBS sufferers (as measured by a balloon-like device being expanded in the colon). I have had that "chicken or the egg" sensation before though. For example, one time I was supposed to meet some friends after work. As I thought about it at work, I started to get anxious: what if I had an attack? Then I started to feel signs that an attack was coming on. So naturally my anxiety increased and symptoms got worse, which made me more anxious, which made the symptoms worse... a very nice downward spiral. What bakes my noodle is would I have had an attack if I hadn't worried about having one in the first place ("there is no spoon")?-- Jared
 

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I'm with JennT on this one. The vast majority of IBSers aren't hypochondriacs. And because stress is a universal trigger for IBS, our anxieties about IBS can actually make an attack worse. So it seems only natural that yoga, hypnosis, deep breathing meditation, and other forms of relaxation help IBS (not cure--help) by preventing our minds from making a bad situation worse.The hypersensitivity comment is interesting because it is supported by medical research. In clinical trials, IBS sufferers tended to feel bowel discomfort more quickly than non-IBS sufferers (as measured by a balloon-like device being expanded in the colon). I have had that "chicken or the egg" sensation before though. For example, one time I was supposed to meet some friends after work. As I thought about it at work, I started to get anxious: what if I had an attack? Then I started to feel signs that an attack was coming on. So naturally my anxiety increased and symptoms got worse, which made me more anxious, which made the symptoms worse... a very nice downward spiral. What bakes my noodle is would I have had an attack if I hadn't worried about having one in the first place ("there is no spoon")?-- Jared
 
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I really wish more people would become aware and accept the connection of IBS to a mental state. There seems to be some horrible stigma that goes along with admitting that one has a psychological condition...but they have NO problem with believing and/or obsessing about a PHYSICAL condition. It is really hard to separate the "real" from what we create and believe to be "real".
 
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I really wish more people would become aware and accept the connection of IBS to a mental state. There seems to be some horrible stigma that goes along with admitting that one has a psychological condition...but they have NO problem with believing and/or obsessing about a PHYSICAL condition. It is really hard to separate the "real" from what we create and believe to be "real".
 

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Well, I don't think the jury is anywhere near in on declaring IBS a mental condition. True, stress and attitude can affect and/or trigger an attack, but I'm sure there's more to it than that. Keep in mind that doctors believed for years that stomach ulcers were caused by a high-stress lifestyle, until the discovery of a causative bacteria.I think my husband is a hypochondriac. He has diabetes, which causes a variety of very-real physical complaints, which he tends to attribute to something else. Last week, every time he moved his eyes, his head hurt, so he was convinced he had a brain tumor. A few days later, his leg was hurting, and he told me he was going to have to get an artificial hip. Last month he had a superficial skin cancer burned off, and now he's sure it's spreading through his body. Whenever he gets stressed, he's thinks he's having a heart attack. (We've been to the ER a few times for this.) Of course, even hypochondriacs do fall ill. You've heard about the inscription on a hypochrondriac's tombstone: "See, I TOLD you I was sick!"
 
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