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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi everyone!!I was diagnosed in March of 99 with IBS-D, but have had this little problem since the day i was born. I have a favor to ask.I am a sophomore in college. I have to give a 6 minute speech in my Advanced Leadership Developement class, it can be on any topic. But 6 minutes is a long time to talk, something i know i can talk about to fill up time is IBS. I don't feel embarrased talking about IBS to everyone in my class, problem, I have years of information, But what i would like to include is your personal input to make them understand what its like to like with IBS. Or anything you suggest i should include. I thank you for you help!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
WOW! What a great opportunity. Consider using Molly's brochure as your 'ground work'. It's simple, basic, yet still gets th point across.I would then address some of the research and optionsout there, such as LEAP, calcium, Lotronex, etc, and focus on the need for this to be taken seriously, more money to be spent on looking for a cure.Please keep us updated, I'm sure you're going to do an outstanding job!!------------------Color Rainbows in the Rain
 

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The worst part of IBS is the people who don't understand how truly debilitating it can be, who figure you can pop a pill and go on your way, who offer advice as if you hadn't already thought of most of it yourself, who think you're malingering, who think you're using it as an excuse to take a sick day or not make plans, who think it's all in your head and you should just get over it, who assume it's like a flu bug that will go away, who get annoyed with you because of it when they are completely understanding of asthma or diabetes etc, who are condescending and treat you like a child, ........Basically the worst part of IBS is other people........ and second to that is the fact that you often can't do the things you used to do.
 

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I'd say that unless you have ever sat in the bathroom with your head against the wall, crying for the pain to stop, you don't know what it feels like. You could even compare it to some of the other diseases/disorders out there that people do understand. For example, people understand asthma and can imagine how awful their lives would be if breathing, something we have to do to stay alive, hurt. Compare that to IBS where eating, which we have to do to stay alive, can cause such severe stomach pain or D or C it's debilitating.You could also mention how difficult it is to explain a disease that people cannot "see" or "hear." In asthma, you can hear someone wheeze. With arthritis, you can see the swelling. But with IBS, people cannot see it and therefore it is often in the back of their minds that we could be faking it.
 

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Start by asking them to try and remember how they felt when the had an intestinal bug or flu. Everyone has had that experience at sometime or other. Then ask them to imagine them always having those symptoms or having them start at any moment...no matter where you are. This should help them understand what we go through physically and mentally. Good Luck.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Another thing that often helps is describing a day in the life of someone with IBS. Although we all have different things wrong with us, you could use your personal experience (or someone else's). Then you could go into Molly's brochure (which is great for this kind of speech). Also, you might want to get some input beforehand as to what kind of information the class might want to hear. Sometimes this helps with jitters, too (knowing what might interest the class on a certain topic). Good luck. I applaud you for taking this opportunity to inform others about this disorder. Good for you!
Break a leg!
 
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