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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I suffer from bladder heavyness, weak urinary stream, muffled (but frequent) urge to pee. Also rectal pressure, sometimes lower back pain.
Considering the bowel movements and urinating are controlled by pelvic floor muscles, maybe we have some pelvic floor dysfunction or tight pelvic muscles?
 

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Yes. Are you a male? If you are, sometimes the urinary symptoms are called "prostatitis". I think they are connected to digestive problems.
 

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"Prostatitis" or cpps is a little understood condition. You will find my opinions about it in the forum of prostatitis.org
 

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I have to get up twice a night to pee. Throughrout the day i need to pee twice as often as the average person. Ive checked for UTIs- negative. The frequent urination first became a problem for me about 6 months after first developing IBS, and has gotten worse since then. I suffer from excessive gas and bloating and I feel like the trapped gas puts pressure on the bladder, which causes the urgency. (Not sure if this is anatomically plausible). So over time, my bladder got used to emptying itself over-frequently and even if my ibs was to go away, i would still be in the habit of urinating very often.

Its interesting point you raise- that BMs and urinating are both controlled by the same pelvic floor muscles, and that we might have a pelvic floor problem.

http://www.pelvicfloorfirst.org.au/pages/how-can-i-tellif-i-have-a-pelvic-floor-problem.html

Pelvic floor muscle fitness is affected by a number of things. These include:

  • not keeping them active or over working them
  • being pregnant and having babies
  • a history of back pain
  • ongoing constipation and straining to empty the bowels
  • being overweight, obese or having a body mass index (BMI) over 25
  • heavy lifting (e.g. at work or the gym)
  • a chronic cough or sneeze, including those linked to asthma, smoking or hayfever
  • previous injury to the pelvic region (e.g. a fall, surgery or pelvic radiotherapy), and
  • growing older.

So maybe IBS is the cause, not the effect of pelvic floor problems? who knows. Personally, Ive always been wary of doing pelvic floor exercises though because I fear that it may make things worse.
 

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I have noticed I pee more frequently since getting IBS... some days its under control then with out warning ill go through a period of about 10 days where I dont need to urinate one minute then the next I cant hold it. Good luck
 
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