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I suffer from IBS too. Last week my doctor said she read that two Archway brand coconut macaroon's a day are helping many people control IBS. Needless to say, I ran out that very day and bought two boxes. I've been eating my coconut macaroon's every morning in place of breakfast (each is 100 calories) but at this point I don't think it's helped me. The doctor told me the cookies won't work for everyone but you could be one of the luucky ones. They taste really good. Just thought I'd throw my two cents in.
 

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I have heard of people using coconut oil or caprylic acid for IBS symptoms, but never the cookies. Maybe your doc is refering to the fiber in the cookies as being helpful becuase I don't know if there would be enough oil to do any good. Anywhooo.. Here is some info from mercola.com about coconut oil. Approximately 50% of the fatty acids in coconut fat are lauric acid. Lauric acid is a medium chain fatty acid, which has the additional beneficial function of being formed into monolaurin in the human or animal body. Monolaurin is the antiviral, antibacterial, and antiprotozoal monoglyceride used by the human or animal to destroy lipid-coated viruses such as HIV, herpes, cytomegalovirus, influenza, various pathogenic bacteria, including listeria monocytogenes and helicobacter pylori, and protozoa such as giardia lamblia. Some studies have also shown some antimicrobial effects of the free lauric acid. Also, approximately 6-7% of the fatty acids in coconut fat are capric acid. Capric acid is another medium chain fatty acid, which has a similar beneficial function when it is formed into monocaprin in the human or animal body. Monocaprin has also been shown to have antiviral effects against HIV and is being tested for antiviral effects against herpes simplex and antibacterial effects against chlamydia and other sexually transmitted bacteria. The food industry has, of course, long been aware that the functional properties of the lauric oils, and especially coconut oil, are unsurpassed by other available commercial oils. Unfortunately, in the U.S., both during the late 1930s and again during the 1980s and 1990s, the commercial interests of the U.S. domestic fats and oils industry were successful in driving down usage of coconut oil. As a result, in the U.S. and in other countries where the influence from the U.S. is strong, the manufacturer has lost the benefit of the lauric oils in its food products. As we will see from the data I will present in this talk, it is the consumer who has lost the many health benefits that can result from regular consumption of coconut products. The antiviral, antibacterial, and antiprotozoal properties of lauric acid and monolaurin have been recognized by a small number of researchers for nearly four decades: this knowledge has resulted in more than 20 research papers and several U.S. patents, and this past year it resulted in a comprehensive book chapter, which reviewed the important aspects of lauric oils as antimicrobial agents (Enig 1998). In the past, the larger group of clinicians and food and nutrition scientists has been unaware of the potential benefits of consuming foods containing coconut and coconut oil, but this is now starting to change. Kabara (1978) and others have reported that certain fatty acids (FAs) (e.g., medium-chain saturates) and their derivatives (e.g., monoglycerides (MGs)) can have adverse effects on various microorganisms: those microorganisms that are inactivated include bacteria, yeast, fungi, and enveloped viruses. Additionally, it is report-ed that the antimicrobial effects of the FAs and MGs are additive, and total concentration is critical for inactivating viruses (Isaacs and Thormar 1990). The properties that determine the anti-infective action of lipids are related to their structure: e.g., monoglycerides, free fatty acids. The monoglycerides are active; diglycerides and triglycerides are inactive. Of the saturated fatty acids, lauric acid has greater antiviral activity than either caprylic acid (C-8), capric acid (C-10), or myristic acid (C-14). In general, it is reported that the fatty acids and monoglycerides produce their killing/inactivating effect by lysing the plasma membrane lipid bilayer. The antiviral action attributed to monolaurin is that of solubilizing the lipids and phospholipids in the envelope of the virus, causing the disintegration of the virus envelope. However, there is evidence from recent studies that one antimicrobial effect in bacteria is related to monolaurin's interference with signal transduction (Projan et al 1994), and another antimicrobial effect in viruses is due to lauric acid's interference with virus assembly and viral maturation (Hornung et al 1994). Recognition of the antiviral aspects of the antimicrobial activity of the monoglyceride of lauric acid (monolaurin) has been reported since 1966. Some of the early work by Hierholzer and Kabara (1982) that showed virucidal effects of monolaurin on enveloped RNA and DNA viruses was done in conjunction with the Center for Disease Control of the U.S. Public Health Service. These studies were done with selected virus prototypes or recognized representative strains of enveloped human viruses. The envelope of these viruses is a lipid membrane, and the presence of a lipid membrane on viruses makes them especially vulnerable to lauric acid and its derivative monolaurin. The medium-chain saturated fatty acids and their derivatives act by disrupting the lipid membranes of the viruses (Isaacs and Thormar 1991; Isaacs et al 1992). Research has shown that enveloped viruses are inactivated in both human and bovine milk by added fatty acids and monoglycerides (Isaacs et al 1991), and also by endogenous fatty acids and monoglycerides of the appropriate length (Isaacs et al 1986, 1990, 1991, 1992; Thormar et al 1987). Some of the viruses inactivated by these lipids are HIV measles herpes simplex (HSV-1) vesicular stomatitis virus visna virus cytomegalovirus (CMV) Many of the pathogenic organisms reported to be inactivated by these antimicrobial lipids are those known to be responsible for opportunistic infections in HIV-positive individuals. For example, concurrent infection with cytomegalovirus is recognized as a serious complication for HIV+ individuals (Macallan et al 1993). Thus, it would appear to be important to investigate the practical aspects and the potential benefit of an adjunct nutritional support regimen for HIV-infected individuals, which will utilize those dietary fats that are sources of known antiviral, antimicrobial, and antiprotozoal monoglycerides and fatty acids such as monolaurin and its precursor lauric acid. Until now, no one in the mainstream nutrition community seems to have recognized the added potential of antimicrobial lipids in the treatment of HIV-infected or AIDS patients. These antimicrobial fatty acids and their derivatives are essentially nontoxic to man; they are produced in vivo by humans when they ingest those commonly available foods that contain adequate levels of medium-chain fatty acids such as lauric acid. According to the published research, lauric acid is one of the best "inactivating" fatty acids, and its monoglyceride is even more effective than the fatty acid alone (Kabara 1978, Sands et al 1978, Fletcher et al 1985, Kabara 1985). The lipid-coated (envelope) viruses are dependent on host lipids for their lipid constituents. The variability of fatty acids in the foods of individuals as well as the variability from de novo synthesis accounts for the variability of fatty acids in the virus envelope and also explains the variability of glycoprotein expression, a variability that makes vaccine development more difficult. Monolaurin does not appear to have an adverse effect on desirable gut bacteria, but rather on only potentially pathogenic microorganisms. For example, Isaacs et al (1991) reported no inactivation of the common Escherichia coli or Salmonella enteritidis by monolaurin, but major inactivation of Hemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Group B gram positive streptococcus. The potentially pathogenic bacteria inactivated by monolaurin include Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Groups A,F & G streptococci, gram-positive organisms, and some gram-negative organisms if pretreated with a chelator. Decreased growth of Staphylococcus aureus and decreased production of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 was shown with 150 mg monolaurin per liter (Holland et al 1994). Monolaurin was 5000 times more inhibitory against Listeria monocytogenes than ethanol (Oh & Marshall 1993). Helicobacter pylori is rapidly inactivated by medium-chain monoglycerides and lauric acid, and there appears to be very little development of resistance of the organism to the bactericidal effects (Petschow et al 1996) of these natural antimicrobials. A number of fungi, yeast, and protozoa are inactivated or killed by lauric acid or monolaurin. The fungi include several species of ringworm (Isaacs et al 1991). The yeast reported is Candida albicans (Isaacs et al 1991). The protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia is killed by free fatty acids and monoglycerides from hydrolyzed human milk (Hernell et al 1986, Reiner et al 1986, Crouch et al 1991, Isaacs et al 1991). Numerous other protozoa were studied with similar findings; these findings have not yet been published (Jon J. Kabara, private communication, 1997). Research continues in measuring the effect of the monoglyceride derivative of capric acid monocaprin as well as the effects of lauric acid. Chlamydia trachomatis is inactivated by lauric acid, capric acid, and monocaprin (Bergsson et al 1998), and hydrogels containing monocaprin are potent in vitro inactivators of sexually transmitted viruses such as HSV-2 and HIV-1 and bacteria such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Thormar 1999).
 

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Most of the anecdotal evidence I have seen with this is in relation to Crohn's and I think (If memory isn't glitching right now) that it is 2 or 3 cookies that are the correct dose.www.healthcentral.com has "The People's Pharmacy" section on it and searching that should bring up most of the anecdotal stuff they have collected.K.
 

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FYI " Macaroons for Crohn�s? By Karen McNally Bensing Recent Internet and newspaper articles reported that eating a couple of coconut macaroons (small coconut cookies) every day brought relief to some sufferers of Crohn�s disease. Supposedly, the therapeutic ingredient was coconut oil, and whether you ate store-bought macaroons or your mother�s home made recipe didn�t seem to matter. Any food containing coconut oil was reported to be equally effective. So far, no clinical trials have established the beneficial effects of either macaroons or coconut oil in managing the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). But because Crohn�s disease and ulcerative colitis are both digestive disorders, it seems reasonable to think that some foods may sooth an inflamed intestine while others irritate it. AGA member David Sachar, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine and Director Emeritus of the Division of Gastroenterology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, remembers the Archway macaroon story very well. Although the cookies� therapeutic benefits never panned out, the story is useful as a parable, he says. "It shows that people are so desperate for relief from the ravages of Crohn�s disease that they�ll grasp at any straw (or in this case, cookie)." He also notes that no claim of effective treatments for a chronically relapsing and remitting disease can be believed without an adequately controlled clinical trial. It�s not food itself that�s the culprit in IBD, but an overactive intestinal immune system that sounds the alarm when it encounters perfectly harmless foods, explains Dr. Sacher. "You can�t eliminate all stimuli," he says. "So today�s principal mode of treatment is to damp down the intestine�s abnormal response through drug therapy." Such drugs include corticosteroids, immunosuppressants like Imuran� (azathioprine), Purinethol� (6-mer- captopurine) and methotrexate, and newer biologicals like Remicade� (infliximab). Despite the positive effects of medications, most people with IBD experience an increase in pain, diarrhea and bloating related to food. During flares, it�s hard to know what to eat. Foods that caused no problems during the disease�s quiet times become intolerable to an angry digestive tract. My Experiences I�ve had Crohn�s for more than 30 years. It�s been well controlled with medication, and, thankfully, I�ve been spared surgery. Most of the time I can eat pretty much what I want � salads, raw fruits (if they�re peeled), pizza, even peanuts. Popcorn is always a no-no. When my Crohn�s acts up, every meal sends me to the bathroom. I feel bloated and can�t bear to wear anything that constricts my roiling intestines. Even the blandest of diets is disagreeable. I�m limited to small amounts of boiled rice and flat ginger ale until things settle down. Gradually, I return to more normal meals. Dr. Sachar offers three principles of dietary advice to his IBD patients. "The best nutrition is found in food," he says. "I encourage patients with IBD to eat as close to a normal diet as possible." Basic healthy eating patterns apply to people with Crohn�s and ulcerative colitis. Eat a variety of foods with lots of fruits, vegetables and complex carbohydrates such as breads, cereals and pasta. Limit fat and sweets. Substitute fish and poultry for red meats, and use low-fat dairy products. Dr. Sachar�s second principle addresses "plumbing considerations." Roughage found in raw vegetables, fruit peels, nuts and popcorn can damage the fragile intestines of those with ulcerative colitis. Fibrous foods may cause blockages in people with Crohn�s whose intestines are narrowed by inflammation � much like a backed-up pipe. Minimize roughage by peeling and cooking fruits and vegetables. Avoid tough cuts of meat and foods containing nuts, including chunky peanut butter. Third, Dr. Sachar says that when it comes to food, "let your own experience be your guide. If a food is troublesome, don�t eat it." If milk makes you queasy and bloated, try lactose-free dairy products instead. Spicy, rich, fatty foods don�t always agree with me. Although I enjoy them, I limit how much and how often I eat cheesecake, chips or French fries. If you�re underweight or deficient in vitamins and minerals, consider seeing a registered dietitian. Dietitians are experts in assessing individual nutritional needs and will work with you to develop meal plans to add pounds and improve your overall nutritional status. Most health insurance plans will cover such consultations with a referral from your primary care physician. Many people with IBD experiment with alternative nutritional approaches, such as the Gottshall Diet, which recommends eating only certain easily digested carbohydrates that are well absorbed by the intestine. "Many alternative strategies offer real relief," Dr. Sachar says. You may want to try such diets, adapting them to suit your own symptoms and food preferences. I myself haven�t been tempted by the purported benefits of macaroons � mainly because I don�t care for coconut. If only chocolate chip cookies had the same healing properties!" https://www.gastro.org/cgi-bin/dhn-free-art...roons-for-Crohn's?12002
 

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By the way this all started with IBD, which is not IBS and then people with IBS picked up on it.
 
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