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Hi-I'm new to the list. I've suffered from IBS for almost 8 years. To sum up my experience I've had the following: Endometriosis (4 laporoscopies), sinus surgery, allergies, chronic fatigue, and insomnia, to name a few of the major issues. Only recently did I have the root of my problem, IBS, confirmed. For years i've suspected I've had a yeast related form of IBS, which also caused my hormone imbalance, sinus problems, and allergies. I visited a naturopathic Dr. who recommended I have a diagnostic stool analysis which test everything from how you metabolize various foods to the amount of good and bad bacteria you have present in your gut. It turned out that I had an abnormally high amount of candida on all three seperate tests. They clasified the level as "possible toxic." The analysis is done at a lab on the east coast called Great Smokies. Have any of you heard of this?Since finding out my diagnosis I've changed my diet to include a high potency prescription of garlic oil, pepermint, total elimination of all sugar and high carbs. It's very difficult to eliminate alcohol, carbs and sugar but since having done so I've made great improvement. I've had fewer days of IBS and my energy is starting to improve.My naturopathic doctor said my case is severe and it may take up to 6 months of living like this before things get substantially better. I feel fortunate, although every day is a struggle to figure out what to eat. I have a 12 mo old son and sometimes it's just easier to go out to get a salad than it is to try to fix certain meals at home. Please feel free to email me privately if you want more info. I'm looking forward to hearing from more of you.I recently read an article that said IBS was due to anxiety and I just about threw up. Tera
 

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Tara,The IBS, sinus problems, and fatigue can be caused by a food allergy or intolerance. They're both immune system reactions that cause allergy-like symptoms. If your current diet is working for you that's fine, but I wouldn't eliminate all carbs. Carbs are necessary.There's an excellent book on the subject written for lay people:FOOD ALLERGIES AND FOOD INTOLERANCE: THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO THEIR IDENTIFICATIONAND TREATMENT", Professor Jonathan Brostoff (M.D.. Allergy, Immunology and EnvironmentalMedicine, Kings' College, London) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/089...6487508-3420903 and this company developed a blood test for food intolerance. They have an online form to fill in to see if their program is likely to help you.www.leapallergy.comLook for posts by Mike NoLomotil, who is one of the researchers working on food intolerance issues. Please keep us posted, I'm interested to see how your program works in the long run.
 

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Tara,The IBS, sinus problems, and fatigue can be caused by a food allergy or intolerance. They're both immune system reactions that cause allergy-like symptoms. If your current diet is working for you that's fine, but I wouldn't eliminate all carbs. Carbs are necessary.There's an excellent book on the subject written for lay people:FOOD ALLERGIES AND FOOD INTOLERANCE: THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO THEIR IDENTIFICATIONAND TREATMENT", Professor Jonathan Brostoff (M.D.. Allergy, Immunology and EnvironmentalMedicine, Kings' College, London) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/089...6487508-3420903 and this company developed a blood test for food intolerance. They have an online form to fill in to see if their program is likely to help you.www.leapallergy.comLook for posts by Mike NoLomotil, who is one of the researchers working on food intolerance issues. Please keep us posted, I'm interested to see how your program works in the long run.
 

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Hi TeraLike Julia said about Prof Brostoff's book ..It is very good and easy to understand...I have had IBS-D for 40 years along with CVS and everything that goes alongwith it...After working with LEAP I found out that I had a food intolerance to Apple, Coconut, Benzoic acid, Mustard, Cottage cheese and a few others.I have had remarkable results after staying away from those things....I tried for many years to log what I was eating but didn't understand that Food Intolerancewas different then Food Allergy...I had the allergy testing (skin prick) for food allergybut mine come back it was ok...But, like Julia said LEAP had developed a newblood test for food intolerance that was able to pick these items up for me...That is why I didnt think food was causing my problems because the allergytest come back ok....I am very thankful now that I have gotten so much better.I feel really good these days...Take care
 

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Hi TeraLike Julia said about Prof Brostoff's book ..It is very good and easy to understand...I have had IBS-D for 40 years along with CVS and everything that goes alongwith it...After working with LEAP I found out that I had a food intolerance to Apple, Coconut, Benzoic acid, Mustard, Cottage cheese and a few others.I have had remarkable results after staying away from those things....I tried for many years to log what I was eating but didn't understand that Food Intolerancewas different then Food Allergy...I had the allergy testing (skin prick) for food allergybut mine come back it was ok...But, like Julia said LEAP had developed a newblood test for food intolerance that was able to pick these items up for me...That is why I didnt think food was causing my problems because the allergytest come back ok....I am very thankful now that I have gotten so much better.I feel really good these days...Take care
 

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TERA and thread....Very intersting post and reples.First thing that struck me of course was the list of common comorbidities you listed. It is very common for one or more of these conditions to be comorbid with IBS, esp. if it is d-predominent or cyclic.Each involves one or more forms of immunocyte activation as a symptom generating mechanism (humoral and or/cell mediated inflammatory reactions).Foods and additives specific to the patient can indeed trigger the reactions and precipitate the symptoms.There are multiple possible etioligies for this situation, which involve at all times the intricate connectivity of the immune system (gut local and systemic), nervous system (local, or 'Ens', central or 'CNS' and other extragastrointestinal elements of the systemic nervous system, sometimes referred in general as simply 'peripheral' or 'systemic'), the endocrine and the exocrine systems.Food ALLERGY is a manifestation of a specific type of mechanism which can be easily detected and avoided...as the person forms circulating immunoglobulins specific to the provoking food. Alergic people are more prone to developing food sensitivity as a comorbidity.However, "food and chemical sensitivities and intolerances" involve multiple mechanisms both immunologic and non-immunologic which can be invoked and result in the many symptoms you experience.There are several known mechanisms which can result in a partial loss of oral tolerance (the ability to discriminate safe things like foods and most additives) from harmful things (pathogens) which is the basic mechanism of the food sensitivity or intolerance aspect.We do often forget that the digestive tract not only is a primary immunologic "organ" as well as "digestive", and that that both are codependent on each other to function properly.The elements of the system which are wholly codependent include the digestive mechanisms, not only of mechanics and digestive enzymes but the gut flora as well in specific areas of thre gut, and the gut immunocytes (tissue as well as circulating, and those which can be summoned immediately to a sight of insult). There are also specific detoxifying enzymes in the bowel.If any elemement of the system becomes dysfunctional outside of a range of adaptability, which varies from person to person, the result can be "food or chemical sensitivity".One of the most controversial areas of aberrations in the system is dysbiosis (disruption of the flora = dirsuption of proper digestion and = disruption of normal immune function = disruption of normal gut neuromuscular function as well as = disruption of any peripheral or central structures in the body to which the mediators of aberrant immune response are transported).And further one of the most controversial, nay CONTENTIOUS, areas of discussion is candidiasis.Conventional mainstream "wisdom" is that candida is not pathogenic unless you can isolate the hyphae invading the gut tissue on biopsy. Anything less than that is considered of little consequence, even if you get heavy growth on culture. To a degree this is all reasonable since there are ways that the culture can be explained away due to the fact that we are dealing with something that is "flora".HOWSOME-EVER....One of the most fascinating observations I have been able to personally make over the last 7 years or so of looking at thousands of end point mediator release assays of patients who have experienced a partial loss of oral tolerance is the following...Irrespective of culture results (which do indeed not guarantee that candidic "dysbiosis" is the origin of symptom generation) is that within the population of people reporting IBS-d-type symptoms (D, PAIN, BLOATING, GAS, ad nauseaum) and especially those who demonstrate additional systemic symptoms a very strange yet logical thing can be seen on the assays of a SUBPOPULATION of IBS d-types and cyclics.Candida is flora. Flora does not get "read" by the immune system, regardless of what mechanism we speak of, as "not safe". Immunocytes in normal people do NOT release any proinflammatory mediators when presented with candida albicans in vivo OR in vitro.BUT SOME PEOPLE, with this symptoms set, SHOW A LOSS OF TOLERANCE to candida albicans. In vitro, the Mediator Release Test in most people shows no reaction to candida but in some there is a RELEASE OF MEDIATOR (cellular inflammtory reaction) to candida...normal flora.Now the question remains as to specifically why each of these persons immune system is reactive to candida is a matter of wide possibilities...candida overgrowth = response by the immune system in an attempt to contain it, loss of ability to discriminate that or other yeasts from pathogens as part of a genralzied loss of tolerance....that is, one has to determine if the sensitivity is primary or the sensitivity is secondary.
Primary candida overgorwth can and does result in loss of oral tolerance to CA of course plus loss of tolerannce to other dietary componenents as a consquence of disrupting the normal gut-immune interactive functions we listed above.So not only should we not dismiss the suggestions of the ND out of hand, nor suggest that the food sensitivity may not be explicitly linked to and even possible caused by some aberration in the candida-gut-immunocyte relationship, but it should be part of the differential diagnosis. So far it is not that well accepted as most have not observed yet this phenomenon....reaction of circulating immunocytes to candida. Only the indirect suggestive methods of diagnosis are used (Symptoms? heavy candida growth? Candida diet!).or (no tissue culture showing invasive hyphae? rule out). Both are just as potentially ill-advised.Do I have some solution per se...no, I am just sharing what I have learned by both direct observation and personal experience.Twice I suffered an exacerbation of my symptoms in the last 8 years for no apparent reason.In BOTH cases I grew heavy candida on culture AND showed a reactivity to candida that was not there on prior MRT assays. Since the dietary treatment of candida has such poor outcomes (face it, it does...it does not work very well by itself and is very difficult to follow and can also result in nutritional problems) my response and that of my doctors was "lets just kill it" in your gut. So thats what we did. After the first course of antifungal therapy my IBS symptoms went back to remission on my prior avoidance diet....for about 6 months then it started again!So the second course of antigungal therapy was more agressive. that was three years ago or so and no "re-overgrowth" has occurred.So while it is tempting to respond to cases like this with posts like "here is some accurate IBS information for you" which is apparently intended to imply that the other information you are getting is not accurate, if one applies a little integrative thinking one might discover that not all cases fit "in the box".You very well may be one that fits the diagnosis suggested by your current therapist...and there is no juxtaposed "inaccurate info" on IBS posted here.Suggestions?.....if there truly is compelling suggestion of candida overgrowth discuss with your doctor the options of antifungal therapy.Eat well. Think well. be well.MNL
 

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TERA and thread....Very intersting post and reples.First thing that struck me of course was the list of common comorbidities you listed. It is very common for one or more of these conditions to be comorbid with IBS, esp. if it is d-predominent or cyclic.Each involves one or more forms of immunocyte activation as a symptom generating mechanism (humoral and or/cell mediated inflammatory reactions).Foods and additives specific to the patient can indeed trigger the reactions and precipitate the symptoms.There are multiple possible etioligies for this situation, which involve at all times the intricate connectivity of the immune system (gut local and systemic), nervous system (local, or 'Ens', central or 'CNS' and other extragastrointestinal elements of the systemic nervous system, sometimes referred in general as simply 'peripheral' or 'systemic'), the endocrine and the exocrine systems.Food ALLERGY is a manifestation of a specific type of mechanism which can be easily detected and avoided...as the person forms circulating immunoglobulins specific to the provoking food. Alergic people are more prone to developing food sensitivity as a comorbidity.However, "food and chemical sensitivities and intolerances" involve multiple mechanisms both immunologic and non-immunologic which can be invoked and result in the many symptoms you experience.There are several known mechanisms which can result in a partial loss of oral tolerance (the ability to discriminate safe things like foods and most additives) from harmful things (pathogens) which is the basic mechanism of the food sensitivity or intolerance aspect.We do often forget that the digestive tract not only is a primary immunologic "organ" as well as "digestive", and that that both are codependent on each other to function properly.The elements of the system which are wholly codependent include the digestive mechanisms, not only of mechanics and digestive enzymes but the gut flora as well in specific areas of thre gut, and the gut immunocytes (tissue as well as circulating, and those which can be summoned immediately to a sight of insult). There are also specific detoxifying enzymes in the bowel.If any elemement of the system becomes dysfunctional outside of a range of adaptability, which varies from person to person, the result can be "food or chemical sensitivity".One of the most controversial areas of aberrations in the system is dysbiosis (disruption of the flora = dirsuption of proper digestion and = disruption of normal immune function = disruption of normal gut neuromuscular function as well as = disruption of any peripheral or central structures in the body to which the mediators of aberrant immune response are transported).And further one of the most controversial, nay CONTENTIOUS, areas of discussion is candidiasis.Conventional mainstream "wisdom" is that candida is not pathogenic unless you can isolate the hyphae invading the gut tissue on biopsy. Anything less than that is considered of little consequence, even if you get heavy growth on culture. To a degree this is all reasonable since there are ways that the culture can be explained away due to the fact that we are dealing with something that is "flora".HOWSOME-EVER....One of the most fascinating observations I have been able to personally make over the last 7 years or so of looking at thousands of end point mediator release assays of patients who have experienced a partial loss of oral tolerance is the following...Irrespective of culture results (which do indeed not guarantee that candidic "dysbiosis" is the origin of symptom generation) is that within the population of people reporting IBS-d-type symptoms (D, PAIN, BLOATING, GAS, ad nauseaum) and especially those who demonstrate additional systemic symptoms a very strange yet logical thing can be seen on the assays of a SUBPOPULATION of IBS d-types and cyclics.Candida is flora. Flora does not get "read" by the immune system, regardless of what mechanism we speak of, as "not safe". Immunocytes in normal people do NOT release any proinflammatory mediators when presented with candida albicans in vivo OR in vitro.BUT SOME PEOPLE, with this symptoms set, SHOW A LOSS OF TOLERANCE to candida albicans. In vitro, the Mediator Release Test in most people shows no reaction to candida but in some there is a RELEASE OF MEDIATOR (cellular inflammtory reaction) to candida...normal flora.Now the question remains as to specifically why each of these persons immune system is reactive to candida is a matter of wide possibilities...candida overgrowth = response by the immune system in an attempt to contain it, loss of ability to discriminate that or other yeasts from pathogens as part of a genralzied loss of tolerance....that is, one has to determine if the sensitivity is primary or the sensitivity is secondary.
Primary candida overgorwth can and does result in loss of oral tolerance to CA of course plus loss of tolerannce to other dietary componenents as a consquence of disrupting the normal gut-immune interactive functions we listed above.So not only should we not dismiss the suggestions of the ND out of hand, nor suggest that the food sensitivity may not be explicitly linked to and even possible caused by some aberration in the candida-gut-immunocyte relationship, but it should be part of the differential diagnosis. So far it is not that well accepted as most have not observed yet this phenomenon....reaction of circulating immunocytes to candida. Only the indirect suggestive methods of diagnosis are used (Symptoms? heavy candida growth? Candida diet!).or (no tissue culture showing invasive hyphae? rule out). Both are just as potentially ill-advised.Do I have some solution per se...no, I am just sharing what I have learned by both direct observation and personal experience.Twice I suffered an exacerbation of my symptoms in the last 8 years for no apparent reason.In BOTH cases I grew heavy candida on culture AND showed a reactivity to candida that was not there on prior MRT assays. Since the dietary treatment of candida has such poor outcomes (face it, it does...it does not work very well by itself and is very difficult to follow and can also result in nutritional problems) my response and that of my doctors was "lets just kill it" in your gut. So thats what we did. After the first course of antifungal therapy my IBS symptoms went back to remission on my prior avoidance diet....for about 6 months then it started again!So the second course of antigungal therapy was more agressive. that was three years ago or so and no "re-overgrowth" has occurred.So while it is tempting to respond to cases like this with posts like "here is some accurate IBS information for you" which is apparently intended to imply that the other information you are getting is not accurate, if one applies a little integrative thinking one might discover that not all cases fit "in the box".You very well may be one that fits the diagnosis suggested by your current therapist...and there is no juxtaposed "inaccurate info" on IBS posted here.Suggestions?.....if there truly is compelling suggestion of candida overgrowth discuss with your doctor the options of antifungal therapy.Eat well. Think well. be well.MNL
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi-Thank you all very much for your responses. As Mike explained, I to have learned over the years that there indeed is NO one cause for IBS. Every person is different and every person's body is different. It's funny how my symptoms started after a year of intense antibiotic therapy for acne and upper respiratory illnesses. Prior to this point I had not had any health problems...no allergies, no stomach problems, nothing. Then, all of a sudden I developed sinus infections (which prompted more antibiotic use), menstrual disorders, and IBS. I personally find it hard to believe that they are not related, at least in my case.A few years ago I got so frustrated with my body that I decided to cut out all possible irritants to my digestive system--coffee, alcohol, tea, sugar, high carbs, et cetera. After doing this religiously for a few months every single one of my symptoms went away--the sinus problems, the allergies, menstrual pain and problems. Of course I was only able to stick to this for about 4 months I was convinced that my problem was related to food. When I eat sugar now I can actually feel my body reacting...I get a really bad taste in my mouth like fermentation. Wierd? I do worry about vitamin and mineral deficiency. I feel confident that my ND is treating my problem properly. I failed to mention in my first post that she started my treatment with a two week course of Nystatin. Perhaps I should take this longer? Regarding Carbs, I'm not sure what to believe. I do know that when I eat carbs, even just a bowl of pasta, i get bloated. Of course it doesn't happen right away but it does happen. When I stick to low carbs, protein and veggies, I feel like a completely different person. Where is the balance for me? It's frustrating.One other thing I didn't mention was that my ND thinks that b/c my immune system is "taxed" b/c it's constantly fighting the overgrowth of the bad bacteria that it may have allowed for a homrmone imbalance, causing the endometriosis. She thinks that my liver may have been performing at a lower lever and not doing it's job of filtering out excess estrogen. Maybe I'm naive but I believe my Doc. When my IBS improves, so do my menstrual problems. I have some deep endometriosis in my pelvic tissue that was never able to be excised and this flares up and caused pain when my estrogen gets too high. It always seem to coincide with how my IBS is doing. I'm convinced! Anyway, I appreciate letting me tell my story and I'm thankful there is a group like this. Thanks you all for you time.Tera
 

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Hi-Thank you all very much for your responses. As Mike explained, I to have learned over the years that there indeed is NO one cause for IBS. Every person is different and every person's body is different. It's funny how my symptoms started after a year of intense antibiotic therapy for acne and upper respiratory illnesses. Prior to this point I had not had any health problems...no allergies, no stomach problems, nothing. Then, all of a sudden I developed sinus infections (which prompted more antibiotic use), menstrual disorders, and IBS. I personally find it hard to believe that they are not related, at least in my case.A few years ago I got so frustrated with my body that I decided to cut out all possible irritants to my digestive system--coffee, alcohol, tea, sugar, high carbs, et cetera. After doing this religiously for a few months every single one of my symptoms went away--the sinus problems, the allergies, menstrual pain and problems. Of course I was only able to stick to this for about 4 months I was convinced that my problem was related to food. When I eat sugar now I can actually feel my body reacting...I get a really bad taste in my mouth like fermentation. Wierd? I do worry about vitamin and mineral deficiency. I feel confident that my ND is treating my problem properly. I failed to mention in my first post that she started my treatment with a two week course of Nystatin. Perhaps I should take this longer? Regarding Carbs, I'm not sure what to believe. I do know that when I eat carbs, even just a bowl of pasta, i get bloated. Of course it doesn't happen right away but it does happen. When I stick to low carbs, protein and veggies, I feel like a completely different person. Where is the balance for me? It's frustrating.One other thing I didn't mention was that my ND thinks that b/c my immune system is "taxed" b/c it's constantly fighting the overgrowth of the bad bacteria that it may have allowed for a homrmone imbalance, causing the endometriosis. She thinks that my liver may have been performing at a lower lever and not doing it's job of filtering out excess estrogen. Maybe I'm naive but I believe my Doc. When my IBS improves, so do my menstrual problems. I have some deep endometriosis in my pelvic tissue that was never able to be excised and this flares up and caused pain when my estrogen gets too high. It always seem to coincide with how my IBS is doing. I'm convinced! Anyway, I appreciate letting me tell my story and I'm thankful there is a group like this. Thanks you all for you time.Tera
 

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Hi TeraYour history sounds a lot like mine with the IBS, sinusitis, and menstrual problems. All my symptoms got much worse after longterm antibiotic use for sinus infections also. I have had to limit my diet, cutting out milk, sweets(that's hard),wheat and other stuff. I also suspect some problems with yeast. I am going to visit a new Dr next month who hopefully is more progressive than the ones I have now who seem to just want to push more antibiotics on me. Are you IBS C or D or both? Itchi
 

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Hi TeraYour history sounds a lot like mine with the IBS, sinusitis, and menstrual problems. All my symptoms got much worse after longterm antibiotic use for sinus infections also. I have had to limit my diet, cutting out milk, sweets(that's hard),wheat and other stuff. I also suspect some problems with yeast. I am going to visit a new Dr next month who hopefully is more progressive than the ones I have now who seem to just want to push more antibiotics on me. Are you IBS C or D or both? Itchi
 

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Hi, TeraI've known several people who have been diagnosed with systemic candida and gone on Nystatin along with an anti-candida diet. They have all done very well. The diet is difficult, and it does take time, but the rewards are worth it.It sounds like you're in good hands.
 

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Hi, TeraI've known several people who have been diagnosed with systemic candida and gone on Nystatin along with an anti-candida diet. They have all done very well. The diet is difficult, and it does take time, but the rewards are worth it.It sounds like you're in good hands.
 
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