Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Health Support Forum banner
1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Close to half of a people with IBS were positive for the parasite Blastocystitis hominis, versus less than 10% of a control group.
quote: Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2004 Apr;70{4}:383-385. IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: IN SEARCH OF AN ETIOLOGY: ROLE OF BLASTOCYSTIS HOMINIS. Yakoob J, Jafri W, Jafri N, Khan R, Islam M, Beg MA, Zaman V. Section of Gastroenterology, Departments of Medicine and Pathology, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. This study was designed to examine stool specimens of irritable bowel syndrome IBS patients for Blastocystis hominis, a common intestinal parasite. One hundred fifty patients were enrolled, 95 IBS cases and 55 controls. These patients provided a medical history, and underwent physical and laboratory evaluations that included stool microscopy and culture for B. hominis and colonoscopy. The 95 cases {51 males and 44 females} had a mean +/- SD age of 37.8 +/- 13.2 years. Stool microscopy was positive for B. hominis in 32% {30 of 95} of the cases and 7% {4 of 55} of the controls {P = 0.001}. Stool culture was positive in 46% {44 of 95} of the cases and 7% {4 of 55} of the controls {P < 0.001}. Stool culture for B. hominis in IBS was more sensitive than microscopy {P < 0.001}. Blastocystis hominis was frequently demonstrated in the stool samples of IBS patients; however, its significance in IBS still needs to be investigated. Stool culture has a higher positive yield for B. hominis than stool microscopy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,821 Posts
Thanks for the good info Floridian, another possible piece of the puzzle. It was a nice sized study, too....Maybe that's why "ParaGone", followed by probiotics, helped get my disabling, severe, chronic diarrhea down to mild and controllable!T-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,398 Posts
quote:Close to half of a people with IBS were positive for the parasite Blastocystitis hominis, versus less than 10% of a control group.
Sorry, but you got caught by making the assumption that a single abstract tells all. We know from years of research that parasites are an unlikely factor in most cases of (Western-based) IBS, so right away, I know something is amiss. The fact that it was published in Pakistan support the notion they are dealing with something other than IBS over there. And you also got caught by making the assumption that they did a good study based on what was published in the abstract. But the paper revealed to me that this was not the case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,821 Posts
Just to play devil's advocate, I don't know one way or the other for certain, but here's an article from WebHealth uk:"Interstinal parasites are much closer to home than we think. Antony Haynes reviews evidence which highlights the prevalence of previously unidentified faecal organisms (UFOs) and their significance to health. Parasitic infestations are now so widespread thay they affect about 150 million people in the US and at least 40% of the world's population. Dr. Hermann Bueno, one of the world's most experienced parasitologists, believes that parasites are the missing diagnosis in the genesis of many chronic health problems. Signs of parasitic infection in adults include: abdominal pain abdominal bloating aches and pains anaemia arthritis autoimmune disease chronic fatigue colitis constipation diarrhoea fever flatulence food allergy gastritis headaches inflammatory bowel disease immune system problems irritable bowel syndrome malabsorption skin conditions and itching sleep disturbances rectal bleeding vomiting While over 130 different parasites have been found in Americans, the following are the most common:Blastocystis hominis, which can be asymptomatic, but can cause irritable bowel, chronic fatigue, arthritis and rheumatism.Dientamoeba fragilis, which can also be asymptomatic, or cause diarrhoea, tenderness and melaena....etc" http://www.webhealth.co.uk/Research_Articl...s_research.html Also, personal stories are at the medical mismanagement site:"We are from Walkerton ON and as you probably know have had major water problems. My wife and daughter as many others had been diagnosed with IBS. however with followup tests my daughter now has Df."e-mailed by D. July 01 "After 7 years of IBS diagnosis, 7 GI specialists, numerous MD's, D.Fragilis was found at GSDL. My symptoms have accumulated to add up to what otherwise has been called Gulf-War Syndrome." "Many years ago (maybe 16) I was diagnosed with Irritable bowel after complaining about abdominal pain. since then I've sort of ignored the problems. A year ago I was diagnosed with MANY food sensitivities. Stool tests eventually revealed infection with D.fragilis." http://bara.idx.com.au/dfragilis/medical_mismanagement.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,398 Posts
quote:Just to play devil's advocate, I don't know one way or the other for certain, but here's an article from WebHealth uk:
So what does this mean, that you admit WebHealth UK is feeding us misinformation from the devil?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
Talissa (and Floridan):Are you concerned that some pathenogenic parasites are causing or contributing to your "IBS-like" gut symptoms?Have you been to a skilled "Bodytalk" practitioner (ie by skilled, I mean one who has done advanced training in the system and keeps up-to-date on it and uses it as his or her sole practise)?Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,821 Posts
Flux, you made me LOL & wake my family up! Very bad. I think I was referring more to the NJ Devils, my fav hockey team.
Scott, I've no idea what a "bodytalk" practioner is--the rock I live on is smaller than yours(& btw, I'm very jealous--New Zealous must be the most beautiful place on earth!) Anyways, is that like polarity treatment?I think what everyone can agree on(except maybe Eric), is that there's still alot we don't know about IBS. I can't speak for FL, but I was just spitting it out there.Someone here may also have been misdiagnosed. Also, my skewed logic says that if someone has imbalanced intestinal flora, they may be more open to parasitic infection because they're low on the "good" bugs, to fight off big bad invaders....Oh heck, I can't resist, here's another tale from ibs tales: http://www.ibstales.com/happy_tales.htm (click on women's mostly constipation, happy tales 2)It's long. I'm ducking now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Here's another article that involved patients diagnosed according to Rome criteria. It found that {as a group}, IBS patients were more likely to have Blastocystis in their gut. It isn't proven according to Koch's postulates, but it is real science.
quote: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1999 Jun;18{6}:436-9. Irritable bowel syndrome in patients with Blastocystis hominis infection. Giacometti A, Cirioni O, Fiorentini A, Fortuna M, Scalise G. The prevalence of Blastocystis hominis in stool specimens of individuals with gastrointestinal symptoms was evaluated to study a possible link between the protozoan and the irritable bowel syndrome. According to the Rome diagnostic criteria, 388 patients were evaluated. Altogether, 81 patients were classified as affected by irritable bowel syndrome. Blastocystis hominis was recovered from the stools of 38 subjects, 15 of whom belonged to the group with irritable bowel syndrome {P = 0.006}. In addition, patients with irritable bowel syndrome were significantly more likely to have five or more Blastocystis hominis organisms per field {P = 0.031}. In conclusion, there was a set of patients with irritable bowel syndrome in whom the presence of Blastocystis hominis may not be incidental.
Here's another article that show a relationship between Blastocystis and flatulence, pain, and D. The symptoms cleared up after a treatment with anti-parasite therapy.
quote: Acta Med Okayama. 2000 Jun;54{3}:133-6. Clinical significance and frequency of Blastocystis hominis in Turkish patients with hematological malignancy. Tasova Y, Sahin B, Koltas S, Paydas S. The effect of Blastocystis hominis {B. hominis} in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised subjects has been the subject of debate in recent years, mostly in response to its unknown pathogenicity and frequency of occurrence. We performed a non-randomised, open labelled, single institute study in our hospital in order to investigate the clinical significance and frequency of B. hominis in patients suffering from hematological malignancy {HM} who displayed symptoms of gastrointestinal diseases during the period of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. The presence and potential role of other intestinal inclusive of parasites were also studied. At least 3 stool samples from each of 206 HM patients with gastrointestinal complaints {the HM group} were studied. These were compared with stool samples from a control group of 200 patients without HM who were also suffering from gastrointestinal complaints. Samples were studied with saline-lugol, formalin-ether, and trichome staining methods. Groups were comparable in terms of gender, age and type of gastrointestinal complaints. In the HM group, the most common parasite was B. hominis. In this group, 23 patients {13%} had B. hominis, while in the control group only 2 patients {1%} had B. hominis. This difference was statistically significant {P < 0.05}. Symptoms were non-specific for B. hominis or other parasites in the HM group. The predominant symptoms in both groups were abdominal pain {87-89.5%}, diarrhea {70-89.5%}, and flatulence {74-68.4%}. Although all patients with HM were symptom-free at the end of treatment with oral metranidazol {1,500 mg per day for 10 days} 2 patients with HM had positive stool samples containing an insignificant number of parasites {< 5 cells per field}. In conclusion, it appears that B. hominis is not rare and should be considered in patients with HM who have gastrointestinal complaints while being treated with chemotherapy. Furthermore, metranidazol appears to be effective in treating B. hominis infection.
IBS is not a defined disease; it is a syndrome or collection of symptoms. I don't believe that there is "A CAUSE" - there are many things that can cause the symptoms. We don't know how many people suffer from chronic D, gas and pain due to Blastocystis, but there is evidence that some people in that category are diagnosed as having IBS, and they are not getting the appropriate treatment.
quote: Phytother Res. 2000 May;14{3}:213-4. Inhibition of enteric parasites by emulsified oil of oregano in vivo. Force M, Sparks WS, Ronzio RA. Oil of Mediterranean oregano Oreganum vulgare was orally administered to 14 adult patients whose stools tested positive for enteric parasites, Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba hartmanni and Endolimax nana. After 6 weeks of supplementation with 600 mg emulsified oil of oregano daily, there was complete disappearance of Entamoeba hartmanni {four cases}, Endolimax nana {one case}, and Blastocystis hominis in eight cases. Also, Blastocystis hominis scores declined in three additional cases. Gastrointestinal symptoms improved in seven of the 11 patients who had tested positive for Blastocystis hominis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Scott,I am not familiar with "Bodytalk". My IBS developed shortly after a stomach infection about 1.5 years ago. A low carb diet has brought it under control; cutting way back on the fructose made a big difference for me. I also have ankylosing spondylitis, a form of arthritis that is associated with Klebsiella bacteria in the gut - the bacteria produces a protein antigen, and my antibodies attack that protein, as well as my own connective tissues. Many people with AS find a low starch diet to be helpful. Side note: a friend in NZ just sent me a package with Manuka oil products and an incredible picture of their home range (on the Bay of Plenty). Gorgeous country!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,398 Posts
quote:Here's another article that involved patients diagnosed according to Rome criteria.
Where is the first article?
quote:It found that {as a group}, IBS patients were more likely to have Blastocystis in their gut. It isn't proven according to Koch's postulates, but it is real science.
Real science? The first article was certainly wasn't and it even seem to argue against this claim. The second article may have something, but all you got is an abstract. The third article also seems to argue against this claim.
quote: Blastocystis hominis was recovered from the stools of 38 subjects, 15 of whom belonged to the group with irritable bowel syndrome {P = 0.006}.
So I got the math right, it means 7% of the controls had it and 18% of the IBS subjects, which doesn't sound like a big difference, despite their apparent claim of statistical significance. Do you have the article to better evaluate this?
quote:In addition, patients with irritable bowel syndrome were significantly more likely to have five or more Blastocystis hominis organisms per field {P = 0.031}.
I am assuming there wasn't blinding going on and it doesn't say whether this was from microscopy or from culture.
quote:Here's another article that show a relationship between Blastocystis and flatulence, pain, and D. The symptoms cleared up after a treatment with anti-parasite therapy
Since these subjects had some else going on that could have compromised their immune system, the results don't tell us anything with regard to how it would affect a healthy person.
quote:were compared with stool samples from a control group of 200 patients without HM who were also suffering from gastrointestinal complaints.
In fact, could this group have been the one with IBS? That would argue against the claim.
quote:but there is evidence that some people in that category are diagnosed as having IBS
Where is the evidence?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
quote: Here's another article that involved patients diagnosed according to Rome criteria.Where is the first article?
Your objection to the first article was that it may not have been IBS ala Rome criteria. So a provided a second article, one which did show an association between Blastocystis and IBS as defined by the Rome Criteria. I did not say the first article contained any reference to Rome - you mis-interpreted.
quote:"So I got the math right, it means 7% of the controls had it and 18% of the IBS subjects, whichdoesn't sound like a big difference, despite their apparent claim of statistical significance"
Your arithmetic is excellent, but again your interpretation is biased. One study showed a 10 vs 50% prevalence of Blasto. Another shows a 7 vs 18%. That is an odds ratio of 2.5 to 5. It is not merely statistically significant; it is a big difference. This data is quite consistent with the idea that Blasto is one organism that can cause chronic diarrhea and other symptoms that are diagnosed as being IBS. Where is the evidence?? There are nearly 500 articles on Blasto in the PubMed index. If you were to browse this literature in even a cursory fashion, you would see that this microbe, which was once considered harmless, is now recognized as a pathogen that can cause diarrhea, gas, and distension. Blasto can increase intestinal permeability and alter cytokines, which can lead to persistent functional problems long after the infection is resolved. (or don't you believe in post-infective IBS??)You also side-stepped my central points: that IBS is a collection of symptoms, that Blasto can cause these symptoms, and that tests for Blasto are rarely done before diagnosing a person as having IBS. In your crusade against Candida being a cause of IBS, you atleast were able to cite some research which showed that the yeast was not present in the G.I. tracts of people with IBS. Can you say the same for Blastocystis??
quote: J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Nov;32(11):2865-6. Intestinal colonization of symptomatic and asymptomatic schoolchildren with Blastocystis hominis. Nimri L, Batchoun R. A study of single stool specimens was done to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among 1,000 primary school children. A questionnaire was completed by each child's parents. Specimens were examined by using wet-mount preparation, formaline-ether concentration, and Sheather's flotation technique. Trichrome and acid-fast stains were done. Blastocystis hominis was observed in 203 (20.3%) of the specimens examined, and 175 specimens contained this organism in the absence of other pathogenic parasites. Older children had fewer B. hominis infections (6 to 7 years old, 50% infection rate; 8 to 9 years, 27.5%; 10 to 12 years, 9.5%). The most common complaints reported by 75 children harboring the parasite were a mild recurrent diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, anorexia, and fatigue. Blastocystosis is quite common among schoolchildren. Contaminated drinking water is suspected to be the source of infection.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,831 Posts
quote: The best they could have concluded is that many people in Pakistan are suffering from gastrointestinal problems and that parasites are a likely source of these problems.
Amen!But people in India don't need studies to conclude this. It is a given. Doctors are dealing with parasite and worms all the time because people eat from hawkers who are very unhygienic and don't use safe water.. Many people regularly take deworming agents and if that doesn't work they take stronger stuff to get rid of parasites. They have diarrhea usually and cannot put on weight. That is half the reason why people in India are thin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
Talissa and floridian if you're interested in Bodytalk (which I would hope you would be for the benefit of your health) have a look at my post in the OTC - Alternative Medicines sub-forum.NZ is an amazing country - i'm very stoked to have been brought up here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,398 Posts
quote:Your objection to the first article was that it may not have been IBS ala Rome criteria. So a provided a second article, one which did show an association between Blastocystis and IBS as defined by the Rome Criteria. I did not say the first article contained any reference to Rome - you mis-interpreted.
No, you stated "Here's another article that involved patients diagnosed according to Rome criteria". The first article appeared to picked controls at random; many of them could have had IBS according to Rome, so there were no controls. You never had a first article.
quote: but again your interpretation is biased
Again?
quote: One study showed a 10 vs 50% prevalence of Blasto. Another shows a 7 vs 18%.
There were two studies?
quote:That is an odds ratio of 2.5 to 5. It is not merely statistically significant; it is a big difference.
Not really. We should see some data from other organisms to get better way to judge it. The 7% controls are apparently not sick either. However, the data is enough to make us wonder (for this population of people).
quote:This data is quite consistent with the idea that Blasto is one organism that can cause chronic diarrhea and other symptoms that are diagnosed as being IBS
I agree that it's consistent, but it doesn't tell us that causality is present.
quote: There are nearly 500 articles on Blasto in the PubMed index
So?
quote:which was once considered harmless, is now recognized as a pathogen that can cause diarrhea, gas, and distension.
Many organisms that are not ordinarily pathogenic can be pathogenic under certain circumstances. This is nothing new.
quote:You also side-stepped my central points: that IBS is a collection of symptoms, that Blasto can cause these symptoms, and that tests for Blasto are rarely done before diagnosing a person as having IBS.
Side-stepped? Isn't this stuff commonly known? (It is not generally tested for in Western countries, namely because it is not considered to be a significant pathogen.
)
quote: you atleast were able to cite some research which showed that the yeast was not present in the G.I. tracts of people with IBS. Can you say the same for Blastocystis??
Probably. If you want to convince me (and pretty much the entire GI medical community) otherwise feel free to setup your own lab and collect stool samples from the IBSers in America and publish a study.
quote: Clin Microbiol. 1994 Nov;32(11):2865-6. Intestinal colonization of symptomatic and asymptomatic schoolchildren with Blastocystis hominis. Nimri L, Batchoun R.
This article is actually quite sensible. They find Blastocystis hominis in a fraction of people and in a fraction of them it seems to cause infection in this particular population. For the geographic/demographic situation, this is reasonable and expected. It was a big difference from the first study you posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,141 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,141 Posts
Flux.Some really think they have been infected.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
Floridian, how were you tested for ankylosing spondylitis? Did you have the HLA-B27 blood test? I have just received the results of my GSDL blood test, which shows elevated levels of klebsiella pneumoniae. Do you think that there is any point in being tested for AS? I've had back problems for years, but not too debilitating and I always get reasonable relief with chiropractic treatment.Your comments are so pertinent and timely, as I've been reading a book by an author, Carole Sinclair about how a zero starch diet healed her of AS and IBS. I had never thought of a connection between IBS and back or joint pain, but since reading the book, I have noticed how many people on this board have referred to such pain. I have tried to explain this a few times on ths Gas and IBS forums, but have had vitually zero response. But now I've heard it straight from the horse's mouth, so to speak.Apparently, there is a pathogenic bowel-joint association, that is, association with GI inflammation and inflammatory joint systems. There is also an association with klebsiella and AS, of course.I must re-read the book, as it will make more sense now.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top