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Just came out of a 2 day stay in the hospital while they checked me for possible heart problems. Went to the ER with symptoms = to having a heart attack. They sent me home saying that my heart is fine but a nurse told me she suspected my stomach problems could have caused the pain and so on.....anyone have an idea on this??
 

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There is something called non cardiac chest pains that are related to the gi tract.If you do a search on the web there is some info.You still may want to have a deeper evaluation from a doctor on this however.
 

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I thought I was suffering from heart problems too. After an EKG and some other tests, my doctor told me that 75% of chest pains are esophageal. Related directly to my IBS. Interesting! Lowering stress does help this.
 

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I've had the same problem for some time now. It happens occasionally that I get a sharp pain in my chest, moving down my left arm. One night it lasted for 5 hrs!! My doctor says that my heart is fine. Whenever I get this, I also get a panic attack because I think it's a heart attack. My doc says that it's my abdomen that being so swollen is "pushing" up into my chest.Good luck to you.
 

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been having the same symptons for quite a while now and i'm still kicking.checked out my heart at the hospital and its cool if a little irregular.ibs seems to be the cause but i still get scared so i know your concerns
 

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My husband--who hates doctors and rarely goes--drove himself to the ER from work about 10 years ago positive it was a heart attack. Turned out to be an anxiety attack......Take care.Anxiety SymptomsSmothering sensations and Shortness of breathRacing heart, slow heart beat, palpitationsChest PainLump in throat & Difficulty swallowingSkin losing colour (blanching)SweatingShaking or shivering (Visibly or internally)Neck & shoulder pain & numbness in face or headRapid gastric emptyingIndigestion, heartburn, constipation and diarrheaSymptoms of urinary tract infectionSkin rashesWeakness in arms & tingling in the hands or feetElectric shock feeling anywhere in the bodyDry mouthInsomniaNightmaresFears of going mad or losing controlIncreased depression & suicidal feelingsAggressionSymptoms like 'flu'Distorted visionDisturbed hearingHormone problemsHeadaches & feelings of having a tight band around headSore eyesAgoraphobiaHallucinationsCreeping or pins and needles sensations in the skinIncreased sensitivity to light, sound, touch, and smellHyperactivity Dramatic increase in sexual feelingsPain in the face or jaw that resembles a toothache
 

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what is mvp? (mitral valve prolapse) In a normal valve the flow of blood goes from the left atrium to the left ventricle. Upon closing it prevents blood from going back into the left atrium. With MVP the flaps don't close evenly. One or both flaps collapse backwards, sometimes allowing a small amount of blood to leak through the valve. Mitral valve prolapse is a genetic disorder and seems to affect women three times more than men. It is one of the most common cardiac findings. There is usually no need to be concerned. The heart is functioning perfectly normally and does not tend to degenerate over time. Diagnosis is usually confirmed by an echocardiogram, which provides an actual picture of the valve. Infection of the mitral valve, endocarditis, is extremely rare. However, people with MVP have a slightly greater risk of contracting it. For this reason we suggest antibiotic prophylaxis for certain dental and surgical procedures. Speak to your physician.What is MVP Syndrome? Forty percent of patients with mitral valve prolapse also have an imbalance of the autonomic nervous system, or ANS, called dysautonomia. The ANS is composed of two systems; the parasympathetic and the sympathetic. It controls virtually all body functions, such as respiration, heartbeat, blood pressure, vision, and digestion. When this system is out of balance it can cause a myriad of symptoms, including panic attacks, anxiety, fatigue, migraines, irritable bowel, and more. This combination of symptoms is known as MVP Syndrome. Diagnosis is made by physical examination, a careful medical history, and an echocardiogram. Unfortunately, MVP does not always show up on an echocardiogram. Thus MVPS is a clinical diagnosis. Usually symptoms do not show up before the age of 14 or 15, but more and more children display central nervous system symptoms before the MVP shows up. Ninety-eight percent of people with MVP Syndrome have nothing wrong with their heart. The majority of symptoms are caused by an out-of-balance nervous system.mvps info: Common triggering events - childbirth, major viral illness, menopause, accident, surgery, college (leaving home and stress), death of a loved one, marriage, moving, divorce. Our nervous system doesn't differentiate between good or bad stress. People with MVPS have a higher incidence of: TMJ (temporomandibular joint dysfunction), scoliosis, fibromyalgia, PMS, fibrocystic breast disorder, tinnitus, infertility, SAD (seasonal affective disorder), altitude sickness, seasickness, and endometriosis.Things to avoid: Humidity, extreme temperatures, saunas, lifting heavy weights.Tidbits:MVP affects about 15 to 25 percent of the population.Forty percent of these people have dysautonomia (MVP Syndrome).Seventy percent of patients have depression.Only two percent of MVP patients have actual structural problems.At least 40 to 60 percent of MVPS patients suffer from panic attacks.MVPS patients often have low energy levels.Forty to fifty percent of echocardiograms do not detect MVP.about our organization/what is mvp?/mvps info/treatment/faqsanxiety and depression/symptoms/resources/mvp personalitycheryl's personal story/jim's personal storytreatment: Education - becoming educated will reduce the unknown, thereby reducing the fear. Support groups, seminars, books, newsletters, and videos are very helpful.Diet: Eliminate nervous-system stimulants, such as caffeine, and sugar. Alcohol is not usually tolerated well by MVPS patients. MVPS patients should drink at least 64 ounces of fluid per day, more in hot whether, to keep from dehydrating.Exercise: Start an aerobic exercise program. Build up gradually to at least 30 minutes per day, five times per week.Medication: Beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, antianxiety agents, antidepressants, anti-migraine, anti-diarrheal, and acid controllers. Avoid medications that contain stimulants such as epinephrine and pseudoephedrine.PMA: Positive mental attitude. As Lyn Frederickson says, "Without PMA it is difficult to have the emotional energy to begin, much less stick with, this treatment program."faq's: Here are the questions we are most frequently asked -Q Am I going to have a heart attack?A People with MVP have no more incidence of heart attack than the normal population.Q Am I going crazy?A No, you are not crazy, but living with MVP Syndrome and the lack of information certainly can make you feel as if you are.Q Is a cardiologist the best doctor for me to see?A Not necessarily. Remember, except in very rare cases, this is not a serious heart condition. The best doctor for you is the one who is compassionate, believes and has some understanding of the syndrome.Q I am ready to have valve replacement surgery, but my doctor says I don't need it. I'm tired of this anxiety, constant headaches, and chest pain. A Your doctor is right. Surgery will not get rid of your symptoms. Again, MVPS is not a heart condition, but rather a central nervous system imbalance. Q My echocardiogram was negative, but I have all the symptoms. What does this mean?A Approximately forty to fifty percent of the time MVP does not show up on an echocardiogram. That doesn't necessarily mean you don't have MVP. Just as important as the test itself is your family history. MVP Syndrome is a clinical diagnosis.Major symptoms Fatigue Chest pain Palpitations or irregular heart beat Migraine headaches Anxiety Depression Panic attacks Shortness of breath minor symptoms Neck aches or pains Feeling hot or cold, not related to external temperature Arm or leg aches Shakiness Swelling of arms, hands, legs, or feet Difficulty sleeping Backaches Intestinal or stomach trouble***** Difficulty with urination Numbness in any part of the body Aches or pains in hands or feet Fainting spells Excessive perspiration or inability to perspire Trouble with eyes or visual disturbances Skin trouble or rashes Muscle fatigue or weakness Dizzy spells Muscular tensions Twitching muscles Poor health in general Excessive gas***** Bowel trouble (constipation or loose bowels)***** Hay fever or other allergies Trouble concentrating or memory problemsIm not saying this is your problem but just do more searches on it
 

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The esophagus and the heart are very close to each other.Generally the "where pain is" receptors in the torso are kinda far apart (as compared to your finger tips where they are very close together) and so it can be hard to tell one pain apart from another in the torso of the body.GI problems (heart burn, indigestion, etc) are a really common reason that you can get chest pain that is NOT heart related. IBS-D usually isn't so much as that is the colon rather than the upper GI, but even people without and GI problems can get indigestion/heart burn that feels like a heart problem.Anywho...what you experienced is pretty common, but I would do a follow up with your regular doctor or GI doc to make sure that any upper GI issues that might be a part of this are investigated to see if it was a one-off sort of thing, or an indication of something that may need regular treatment (chronic heartburn or GERD as it is called can cause serious problems if not taken care of).K.
 

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quote: It happens occasionally that I get a sharp pain in my chest, moving down my left arm. One night it lasted for 5 hrs!!
I get this as well. The ekg, doppler and exercise stress test all came out ok. Still, I would like to figure out more about this.
 
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