Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Health Support Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,831 Posts
The main difference is that there is no evidence that symptoms are exclusively relieved by defecation or associated with the onset of a change in stool frequency or stool form (i.e., not irritable bowel syndrome).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The main difference is that there is no evidence that symptoms are exclusively relieved by defecation or associated with the onset of a change in stool frequency or stool form (i.e., not irritable bowel syndrome).Thanks Bonnie
I now have another question that you or maybe Flux can answer.Can an electrogatrography differentiate between IBS & FD?I thought I read somewhere that this test could.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,831 Posts
"Electrodes placed in the gastric cavity and attached by suction or other means to the mucosa, or cutaneous electrodes placed over the upper abdomen, can record electrical activity in the stomach, called the electrogastrograph (EGG). The normal EGG demonstrates slow wave and spike activity, with slow waves controlling the velocity and propagation of gastric contractions (33), and spike activity directly associated with antral contractions (34). There is some evidence to suggest that electrical activity is disordered in FD. Up to two-thirds of FD patients have gastric dysrhythmias (35, 36). Fast gastric electrical activity (tachygastria) was associated with absent antral contractions in animal and human studies (37, 38). Leahy et al. (33) performed EGG in 170 patients with FD, 70 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 20 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and 30 controls. Fasting and/or postprandial EGG was abnormal in 36% of FD patients and in 25% of the patients with IBS who complained of dyspepsia, compared to 8% of those who did not. It was abnormal in 10% of GERD patients and 7% of controls (corresponding to a 93% specificity).However, there was no correlation between any particular symptom and an abnormal EGG.Using cutaneous electrodes, Geldof et al. (39) investigated gastric myoelectric activity in 48 functional dyspepsia patients and 52 controls. They found instability of the gastric pacemaker rate, particularly tachygastria, and absence of the normal increase in postprandial EGG amplitude, the latter abnormality correlating with delayed gastric emptying, as measured by a radio-labeled solid phase meal.The association between an abnormal EGG and delayed gastric emptying has been confirmed in other studies (34, 40), but the relationship between EGG abnormalities and symptoms is inconsistent. In addition, two small studies (n = 30 and 40, respectively) found no difference in EGG recordings between FD patients and healthy controls (41, 42).To summarize, while some FD patients have gastric electrical abnormalities, these are by no means a universal finding, and can also occur in asymptomatic controls. Where present, disordered electrical activity has been linked to delayed gastric emptying, but not to symptoms. Gastric dysrhythmias are unlikely to have a primary pathophysiological role in FD and, in isolation, cannot account for symptoms in the majority of patients with FD. "There doesn't seem to be much difference in postprandial EGG. The whole article is at http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi...4.04086.x/full/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Both IBS and Functional dyspepsia are functional disorders of the gi tract and both share some common things, viceral hypersensitivity and motility problems and brain gut issues. FD is upper gi problems and IBS lower gi problems.They overlap considerable in people also, so you can have both.Functional dyspepsia http://www.gutdoc.com/dyspepsia.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
FD is upper gi problems and IBS lower gi problems.They overlap considerable in people also, so you can have both.Eric?
Is belching a symptom of IBS?I have been told by most of my GIs that it is and I have read that it was in a couple of books on IBS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
I think belching is more a symptom of an upset digestive system. In classic IBS, its the lower colon malfunctioning, in upper gi problems, there can be belching.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Dee, the unc is doing a chat with the experts on april 13, and you can ask them questions like this and about FD or heartburn or gerd issues.You are receiving this email from the UNC Center for Functional GI &Motility disorders because, at one time, you requested information from theCenter. The reason for this email is to remind you of the Centers quarterlyon-line "Chat with the Experts." This month's topic is "BURNING ISSUES:Reflux Disease and You". If you have an interest in this topic, the link tothe chat room is on the Center's home page www.med.unc.edu/ibsThe chat room will open on April 13th, at7:45.We hope that you will join us this month at 7:45 and take this excellentopportunity to learn more about: "BURNING ISSUES: Reflux Disease and You".Dr. Nicholas Shaheen, MD, Map. Director, Center for Esophageal andSwallowing Disorders, UNC -Chapel Hill, will be our guest host. There is anarticle by Dr. Shaheen on the website to introduce this months chat room.You may go directly to the article from the home page link.Enter the chat room on April 13th. from our Center's web page:www.med.unc.edu/ibs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
FYI Dee,"Three in Four People With IBS Also Have Functional DyspepsiaCharlene LainoOct. 14, 2003 (Baltimore) � More patients than thought may suffer from multiple functional gastrointestinal disorders, according to researchers who found that nearly three quarters of people who suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) also have functional dyspepsia."Physicians need to realize that many patients seeking care for gastrointestinal symptoms are likely to have more than one clinical disorder," said lead researcher Ashok K. Tuteja, MD, from the Department of Gastroenterology at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.Dr. Tuteja presented the findings here on Monday at the 68th annual scientific meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology. About 1 in 10 American suffer from IBS and even more from dyspepsia, he said.It has been suggested that dyspepsia and IBS represent the same disease entity � the so-called irritable gut, Dr. Tuteja said. As a result, he and colleagues undertook a study to determine how common each syndrome is and how much the two overlap.The researchers followed 723 people who filled out questionnaires asking about their upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms. Their ages ranged from 24 to 77 years (median, 47 years).IBS was defined as having continuous or recurrent symptoms for three months or more in the previous 12 months. Symptoms included abdominal pain or discomfort that is relieved with defecation or associated with changes in stool, hard or loose stool, straining or urgency, and bloating.Functional dyspepsia was defined as having upper abdominal pain or discomfort six months or more in the previous year.Nearly 15% of the patients reported symptoms of dyspepsia: 6.2% reported ulcer-like dyspepsia, 6.1% reported dysmotility-like dyspepsia, and 9.4% reported reflux dyspepsia. Also, 8.9% of patients had IBS symptoms, and 6.2% reported both dyspepsia and IBS. Of the patients with IBS, 70% also had functional dyspepsia and of subjects with dyspepsia, 43% also had IBS, the study showed.The association between the two syndromes was much greater than that expected by chance (kappa = 0.48), Dr. Tuteja reported. Both IBS and the overlap syndrome were more common in women, but these differences were not statistically significant (P .27). There was no association between any of the disorders and alcohol or aspirin use (P .19), the study showed. The people who reported symptoms of both disorders or symptoms of IBS were much more likely to consult a physician about their problems than those with dyspepsia alone, Dr. Tuteja reported. Thirty-three percent of those with both dyspepsia and IBS symptoms visited a physician in the previous year compared with 17% of patients with dyspepsia alone and 31% with IBS alone.Richard G. Locke, III, MD, associate professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, said that physicians are increasingly recognizing that many patients will have symptoms of more than one gastric disorder.The question, he said, is "should we be rearranging the deck? Are people who have IBS and dyspepsia somehow different than those who have only one or the other?"As drugs targeting the molecular aberrations that cause gastric disorders are developed, knowing the answer to that question will become increasingly important, he said.Kevin W. Olden, MD, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, agreed. "Each person has different molecular changes. The patient with both IBS and dyspepsia will have a different molecular change than the person with just IBS or dyspepsia."Understanding these molecular changes is the wave of the future, he said.ACG 68th Annual Scientific Meeting: Abstract 301. Presented Oct. 13, 2003.Reviewed by Gary D. Vogin, MD" http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/462956
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
No, not psycological, physcial and that its just a symptom of a malfuntioning upper digestive system. People with dyspepsia, can have altered motility of the esphogus. Foods may be a part of this also, like carbonated beverages for example."What are the symptoms of dyspepsia? We usually think of symptoms of dyspepsia as originating from the upper gastrointestinal tract, primarily the stomach and first part of the small intestine. These symptoms include upper abdominal pain (above the navel), belching, nausea (with or without vomiting), abdominal bloating (the sensation of abdominal fullness without objective distention), early satiety (the sensation of fullness after a very small amount of food), and, possibly, abdominal distention (swelling). The symptoms most often are provoked by eating, which is a time when many different gastrointestinal functions are called upon to work in concert.It is appropriate to discuss belching in detail since it is a commonly misunderstood symptom associated with dyspepsia. The ability to belch is almost universal. Belching, also known as burping or eructating, is the act of expelling gas from the stomach out through the mouth. The usual cause of belching is a distended (inflated) stomach that is caused by swallowed air or gas. The distention of the stomach causes abdominal discomfort, and the belching expels the air and relieves the discomfort. The common reasons for swallowing large amounts of air (aerophagia) or gas are gulping food or drink too rapidly, anxiety, and carbonated beverages. People often are unaware that they are swallowing air. Moreover, if there is not excess air in the stomach, the act of belching actually may cause more air to be swallowed. "Burping" infants during bottle or breastfeeding is important in order to expel air in the stomach that has been swallowed with the formula or milk.Excessive air in the stomach is not the only cause of belching. For some people, belching becomes a habit and does not reflect the amount of air in their stomachs. For others, belching is a response to any type of abdominal discomfort and not just to discomfort due to increased gas. Everyone knows that when they have mild abdominal discomfort, belching often relieves the problem. This is because excessive air in the stomach is often the cause of mild abdominal discomfort. As a result, people belch whenever mild abdominal discomfort is felt�whatever the cause.If the problem causing the discomfort is not excessive air, then belching does not provide relief. As mentioned previously, it even may make the situation worse by increasing the air in the stomach. When belching does not ease the discomfort, the belching should be taken as a sign that something may be wrong within the abdomen and that the cause of the discomfort should be sought. Belching by itself, however, does not help the physician determine what may be wrong because belching can occur in virtually any abdominal disease or condition that causes discomfort." http://www.med.miami.edu/patients/glossary...ekey=10531#tocc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What are the symptoms of dyspepsia? We usually think of symptoms of dyspepsia as originating from the upper gastrointestinal tract, primarily the stomach and first part of the small intestine. These symptoms include upper abdominal pain (above the navel), belching, nausea (with or without vomiting), abdominal bloating (the sensation of abdominal fullness without objective distention), early satiety (the sensation of fullness after a very small amount of food), and, possibly, abdominal distention (swelling). The symptoms most often are provoked by eating, which is a time when many different gastrointestinal functions are called upon to work in concert.These sound like my symptoms.Eric do you know if they are they developing drugs for functional dyspepsia along with more drugs for IBS?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
in this case how do they identify dyspepsia as a seperate medical intity from IBS.I think it always start in the stomach and the guts pain develops later. In my case I continued to complain for many years from my stomach before the first time my colon start to spasm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Dee, they are developing some drugs for dyspepsia and they have some already that may work on it.Hypnotherapy has been so effective for IBS they tried it on dyspepsia and it works for that too."Following the success in patients with IBS, we have recently looked at the use of hypnotherapy in functional dyspepsia, which is a closely related condition resulting in primarily upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Again, compared with controls, the hypnotherapy patients showed substantial improvements in both symptoms and quality of life. One of the most striking outcomes of this particular study was that, after a follow up of one year, not one patient in the hypnotherapy group required any further medication compared with 82% and 90% of subjects in the 2 control groups. Similar trends to those observed in the IBS studies were seen for a reduction in medical consultations and time off work. " http://www.aboutibs.org/Publications/hypnosis.html Just like IBS, stressors effect dyspepsia greatly also.Beautylover, they diagnose Dyspepsia from tests and the symptoms a person can have in the upper gi tract that point to dyspepsia. There are also different types of dyspepsia and also gerd.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top