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Is any serious bowel condition, such as cancer, rare for somebody under the age of 30 ? I have IBS, apparently according to my doctor (2 doctors, since I sought a second opinion), yet I am still extremely anxious and worried about it possibly being something more serious. I had a telescopic examination 3 years ago after I had some blood on the surface of my stool, and the examination showed that I had internal piles. I am aware that any reoccurrence of the piles may be a reason for an occasional amount of blood on the surface of a stool. Am I right to be extremely worried to the point where I am having difficulty thinking about anything else, or is the fact I am under 30 with a history of piles, and an examination not THAT long ago a reason to be reassured that what my GP calls IBS is really IBS.
 

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Togs,I am not a doctor (though sometimes feel I must have consulted half the doctors in London over my IBS and associated aches & pains!!) but offer the following:Yes, I believe cancer or serious bowel condition IS uncommon (though not impossible)in those under 30. If your symptoms(you don't say what actual IBS symptoms you are experiencing) are the same as they were when you had your initial examination, that would suggest it is still IBS you are experiencing.If blood on stools is bright red this is suggestive of the problem being piles - the darker the colour of the blood, the more serious it may be.IBS is linked to stress/anxiety. Your worries may be originating from a state of stress and finding a focus in your symptoms, which then, unfortunately, sets up a vicious circle.If you are really concerned and want to be absolutely sure, speak to your GP about another colonoscopy to settle the matter once and for all. He may still be reluctant - they see a lot of people with similar symptoms, me included, and I was over 35 when my IBS started.Hope this helps you,Ian
 

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Hi Togs,I can understand your concern about your bowel problems, but I don't really think you need to worry. Most of the people here on the BB (myself included) have had IBS for at least 4 or more years and I don't think I have yet seen anyone here say they had bowel cancer or anything serious after their initial IBS diagnosis. The following is a quote from an IBS article on the Mayo Clinic Website too that may be of some reassurance.
quote: Fortunately, unlike more serious intestinal diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, IBS doesn't cause inflammation or changes in bowel tissue or increase your risk of colorectal cancer.
The article there is one of the best I have read and I would recommend it to anyone seeking more information about IBS, here is the page address: http://www.mayoclinic.com/findinformation/...54F27F4E&locID= I would also agree with Ian, if you are still concerned see your doctor again and have a check up or another colonoscopy for your own peace of mind.If you did not have other tests before it may also be worth asking about eliminating other possibilities ie Celiac disease (can be checked with just a simple blood test) etc for further reassurance.Also, getting stressed about the problem can often make it worse, so peace of mind is important. Take care of yourself, and be as proactive as you feel you need to be about your healthcare, it is your body after all.Take care, and hope you feel better soon.
 

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To quote you:"Am I right to be extremely worried to the point where I am having difficulty thinking about anything else, or is the fact I am under 30 with a history of piles, and an examination not THAT long ago a reason to be reassured that what my GP calls IBS is really IBS. "If you are "having difficulty thinking about anything else," you really need help because these extreme worries are interfering with your life. One of the things you can do is get another opinion from a doctor you trust. Nobody on this bulletin board can answer your question.Many people under 30 have IBS.Good luck.
 

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TOGS:Were you diagnosed wity IBS and hemorrhoids by a gastroenterologist?If so then the likelihood of him/her being wrong or missing something more serious, especially after (2) separate opinions, is very low. Probably have a beter chance of winning the Florida lottery.Give this book a read as a starter, it may help you get on a proactive course...which will amke you feel more in charge of your condition and less threatened by the unknown.If youi feel the need of further reassurance then by all means ask another board certified GI doc to look at your chart...this should settle it for you.Now if your diagnosis was not arrived at by a board certified GI then I recommend you see one so as to ensure that no stone was left unturned.IBS: A DOCTORS PLAN FOR CHRONIC DIGESTIVE TROUBLESBy Gerard Guillory, M.D.; Vanessa Ameen, M.D.; Paul Donovan, M.D.; Jack Martin, Ph.D. http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/088...3369143-6824157 MNL
 

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PSMine started when I was 10 or so and I am now 50 if that helps with the fear of comorbidity...My only comorbidities are related to the fact that I smoked way too much for many years (but seem to have gotten away with that better than most people) and that I lifetd things that were too heavy for my abdominal muscles to withstand.
Later...
MNL
 
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