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I have long advocated for celiac disease testing for people who have IBS symptoms. IBS is a set of symptoms that can be cause by a wide array of conditions including celiac disease, food allergies, hormone dysregulation, infections, bacteriological imbalances, and others. I just wanted to add yet another published, peer-reviewed study in a very highly respected journal that demonstrated that patients diagnosed with IBS on the basis of their symptoms often have undiagnosed celiac disease. Here is the study: http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/15/5321.asp or find it on pubmed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19908341
CONCLUSION: CD (celiac disease) is common in patients with presumed IBS. Routine screening for CD in patients with symptoms of IBS is recommended.
For a collection of published studies on the testable and treatable causes of IBS, see the Innate Health Foundation's website research page at http://www.InnateHealthFoundation.org/5_c.htm.Rather than just living with IBS, I always recommend those who suffer from these symptoms to see a doctor who has been successful at finding and treating the underlying causes of IBS. Best of health to you all.
 

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It is also quite often HABBA syndrome (dodgy gallbladder).To be honest i would never accept a diagnosis of IBS until all possibilities had been explored.....trouble is Dr's are too quick to give this diagnosis because they know little about other conditions that could cause it (take HABBA for example..my gastro had never even heard of it!).Do your own research into your symptoms and possible causes. Never accept a diagnosis if you have doubts. Insist on further testing.....you have the right afterall it is your body.
 

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Any decent Dr tests for it during the ruling out process and if they don't.. ASK them to.
 

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I also think it's important for any potential celiac patient to know that if they're having an upper scope with biopsies, they should not give up gluten products prior to the procedure. If gluten's been absent from your diet for too long, the small intestine repairs itself and will look normal on exam and even biopsy. If you're having the genetic blood tests, those will remain accurate even with gluten elimination. I've heard of way too many doctors who tell their patients to give up gluten, then send them to referral for a GI specialist with scoping
 

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Exactly what do they look for in the stomach and/or small intestine (in relation to celiac dz) on an upper GI endoscopy? (if anyone knows...)
 

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The villi (the small fingerlike projections that help absorption in the small intestine) appear flattened and inflamed due to damage by gluten. The stomach should appear normal in celiac disease.
 

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The villi (the small fingerlike projections that help absorption in the small intestine) appear flattened and inflamed due to damage by gluten. The stomach should appear normal in celiac disease.
And the portion of the small intestine in question is visible on an upper GI scope (like the duodenum?), or would that be done during a colonoscopy procedure? I've had a colonoscopy, but I'm not sure if this was done or not...My doctor mentioned something about looking at "stomach folds" during an upper GI exam, but I think that was in relation to hypo- or achloridia.
 

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Usually the look at the villi with a biopsy thing for celiac is from the top, not during a colonoscopy even thought that can see the last few inches of the small intestine.
 
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