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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
By way of introduciton I'm a 24 year old UK national who had just finished what I guess US people would call 'grad school'.I've had D type IBS on and off since around 1992. I've finally accepted that, for me, the cause is psychological and not physical. I lost my parents quite close together (dad when I was 17 to Cancer - Mum when 19 to motor accident). For a while I had a mild panic disorder which I'm seemingly now cured of. Haven't shifted the IBS though. It's funny what a leap forward I've found it since I accepted my cause was mental and related to post traumatic stress. Whilst no-one likes to think of themselves as 'barmy', admitting it does take away all the anxiety you get about possible food allegy's or cancer that drive you nuts when you can't narrow it down.Anyway, I take my knocks in life head on and recently decided that I'm only here once, god knows life is short enough, and I wanted to travel. On finishing my grad degree I decided to take a year out backbacking around Australia. Anyone who suffers from D will know what a hard decision that was. But I decided to go for it anyway.I wont pretend I didn't have problems. There were one or two moments of agony, particularly on the massive coach journeys. However, I found that with use of immodium, I could in the main manage my Symptoms. I was away about 8 months and saw and did everything I wanted to do. I learnt to get blase about going to the loo behind bushes in the outback which was another step forward - you don't have to worry about looking for a bathroom in the outback - there is a bush never more than 10 meteres away!The trip was wonderful for self-esteem. It was me sticking two fingers up at my IBS. Don't let your condition stop you living you're life - it is simply too short.However, my one worry with my approach is how much I'm relying on Immodium. Is there any known long term health risks assosiated with overuse of this drug?
 

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Hey DunnyRunner - welcome to the board! I hope no one else thinks I'm pretentious - I've only been here a week myself but have felt so welcomed and so helped!SO, let me be the first to ask you - have you tried Caltrate with Vitamin D? I stumbled onthis board one week ago, suffering D (explosive) for seven years. Started Caltrate one week ago and have been D free since. Its almost too good to be true...I bring this up here because the Calcium string seems to have been buried - do a search for calcium or Caltrate. Read the tips and tricks, and maybe give it a try. LNAPE is the one to ask for specifics about this.The long term effects of Immodium - I don't know, but I am very selective in using it. It is a narcotic that does not cross the blood-brain barrier, so that worries me. Dependence is always an issue - not the narcotic aspect as much as relying on it too much. You are addressing the symptom but not the problem.Also, the psychological aspect of IBS seems to be very common...check threads on childhood trauma, etc. I know my problem has psychological roots, but seems to have been exacerbated by the removal of my gallbladder.Good luck, and welcome!Oh- and check out the Meeting Place BB (go to Hop To at the bottom of the page) There is a string there on Getting to Know you. Meet some of the others!----P.S. You learn more about a road by traveling it than by consulting all the maps in the world.[This message has been edited by Lefty (edited 05-25-99).]
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the welcome lefty.I haven't tried caltrate. A quick scan of my local pharmacy shelf didn't help. Does it have a different brand name in the UK?As it happens I'm in one of my fine spells at the moment, so the problem isn't too pressing. Mind you, I start a new job next week - I imagine that'll mean stuffing myself with immodium and skipping breakfast and only eating the lightest of lunches for the next few weeks! I'm sure people know what I mean......
 

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Hi DunnyRunner - since I'm an ignorant American, what significance does your name have?Caltrate Plus here in the States is a name brand for calcium carbonate, along with vitamin D, a little magnesium, and boron. Linda Nape can tell you the exact balance of ingredients. I've also used generic calcium citrate with vitamin D with success.I agree with your philosophy about "life's too short" - I refuse to let my IBS run my life.Welcome!------------------Fear can hold you prisoner. Hope can set you free.Missycat
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Missy catDunny is an Australian euphamism for toilet.Lost count of the number of times I burst into a service station screaming 'where's the dunny!'.I'm pretty sure we don't have the caltrate over here...Whilst I'm on can anyone tell me the difference (other than price) between Immodium and Immodium Plus (Immodium Plus currently in the throws of a national TV ad campaign here in the UK)
 

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Dunnyrunner - I surely "hope" you do have the Caltrate where you live! It works wonders for the diarrhea - I can attest to that! And I haven't needed any other product in addition to the Caltrate either - except Lactaid for my milk intolerance! Myself, I wouldn't want to use the Immodium - I feel comfortable using the Caltrate and it works for so many people here. If I were you, I would really check into whether or not you can purchase it there...Good luck.. and you are right, I feel the same way, just go and do things - can't let the IBS hold us down! If you try the Caltrate, you may never have to worry again...!
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Missycat - the dunny is the loo. I also have heard that in some places, they're eating Skippy.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Paulp.They do indeed eat Kangaroo. Had a few Kangaroo burgers whilst I was over there and guess what...... NO REACTION!None at all.So get yourself down to your butchers with a special request
 

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Hi Dunnyrunner, and welcome!I was in London two months ago (not letting my IBS stop me either), so I can tell you that Caltrate Plus w/Vitamin D is sold in the larger Boots Chemists. I ran out of the stuff while I was over there, and would have been lost without it. It's in a purple and white box, just like here in the States.Good luck!
 

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Dear Dunnyrunner,I'm Welsh, and believe me, if they sell Caltrate Plus in Neath Safeways you CAN get hold of it in UK!!!! I really admire your "Sod It" attitude and wish I could get a bit now and again. Congratulations (non-patronizing, honestly!)
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all the replies. It's nice to be made to feel so welcome when you're new to a board.I'll be down to boots tommorow to get the caltrate plus. Fingers crossed it sees me through the trials of the new job next week.One thing no-one has answered yet is what is the difference between immodium and immodium plus (other than price)? And ARE there any known or suspected long term effects from over reliance on Immodium?
 

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For me, both immodium and immodium plus do about the same. I don't use them too often -- was talking to my internist yesterday and she said that no more than 6 (total) per day. So far, I haven't gotten that high, but I've come close.
 

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DunnyRunner - When you start the Caltrate Plus, don't expect immediate results. I had to play around with the dosage a bit to find what worked for me. For example, some here said to try 2 a day - no good for me, upped it to 3 a day, with awesome results. So, just don't get discouraged, like I did at first, if it doesn't work right away... and I take them with meals or a light snack.Good luck.
 

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DunnyRunnerI believe I've read on this BB somewhere that the one of the differences between the regular imodium and the plus, it that the plus contains an ingredient called sorbital, which is an artificial sweetner, and can cause diarrhea. It does in me, and can cause gas too. Once in a pharmacy I over heard an older couple reading the ingredients on a bottle and I heard them say sorbital, and I told them that sorbital can cause diarrhea, and they said that was OK because they needed a little help in that department. Imagine, though, buying a product to stop diarrhea, but contains an ingredient to promote diarrhea. Can someone comfirm what I've written? I believe I saw a thread on this back in January.Lena
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The difference between Immodium and Immodium Plus is the plus contains simethicone which is the ingredient in Mylanta Gas. It is supposed to help with the cramping.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hi Dunnyrunner, welcome to the BB, did you enjoy your visit to aussie?Yes you can get kangaroo on the menu at some restaurants, also venison,crocodile and my husband has even tried camel. I am not a big meat eater and the in thing is to cook kangaroo rare and serve it with red sauce, it looks just like blood!yuck Im afraid I didnt use my imagination when I chose my username, but I love yours and could definately relate!
 

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Posted by Brooklin on 3-01-99...Whatever happened to Brooklin?
quote:The following is information obtained from the Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties CD-ROM (1998 version) I have access to at work. I don't know what some of the acronyms and big words mean, but maybe somebody with a medical background can translate it. I hope this helps.IMODIUMJanssen-Ortho/McNeil Consumer ProductsLoperamide HClAntidiarrheal Pharmacology: Diarrhea may be defined as a failure or imbalance of one or a combination of activities in the gut which include secretion, absorption and motility. Loperamide has been shown to act on all of these functions via cholinergic, noncholinergic, opiate and nonopiate receptor-mediated mechanisms. In this way, loperamide effectively reduces fecal output and frequency, improves stool consistency and relieves symptoms of abdominal cramping and fecal incontinence.Loperamide does not seem to possess significant CNS properties.Pharmacokinetics: After oral administration little absorption takes place. About 40% of a 2 mg dose is excreted in the feces with about 30% being unchanged drug. The plasma half-life of absorbed loperamide is approximately 7 to 15 hours.Indications: As an adjunct to rehydration therapy for the symptomatic control of acute nonspecific diarrhea; for chronic diarrhea associated with inflammatory bowel disease; and for reducing the volume of discharge for ileostomies, colostomies and other intestinal resections.Contraindications: Children under 2 years of age.Known hypersensitivity to loperamide or any of the other components; cases in which constipation must be avoided.Loperamide should not be used in the case of acute dysentery which is characterized by blood in stools and elevated temperature. Fluid and electrolyte depletion may occur in patients who have diarrhea. The use of loperamide does not preclude the administration of appropriate fluid and electrolyte therapy.Loperamide must not be used in patients with acute ulcerative colitis and in pseudomembranous colitis associated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, as agents which inhibit intestinal motility or delay intestinal transit time have been reported to induce toxic megacolon. In general, loperamide should not be used when the inhibition of peristalsis is to be avoided. Discontinue loperamide therapy promptly if abdominal distension occurs or if other untoward symptoms develop.Warnings: Children: The use of loperamide is not recommended for children under 12 years of age except on the advice of a physician (see Dosage).Use loperamide with special caution in young children and those with compromised blood brain barrier (e.g., meningitis) because of the greater variability of response in these groups. Dehydration, particularly in young children, may further influence the variability of response to loperamide.In case of accidental ingestion of loperamide by children, see Overdose.Precautions: Pregnancy: Safe use of loperamide during pregnancy has not been established. Reproduction studies performed in the rat and the rabbit revealed no evidence of impaired fertility or harm to the fetus at dosage levels up to 30-fold the therapeutic dose for man. Therefore, loperamide should be used in pregnant women only when, in the opinion of the physician, the potential benefits outweigh the possible hazards.Lactation: There is little information on the excretion of loperamide in human milk, but small amounts of the drug were detected in the milk of a nursing mother. Therefore, loperamide should not be administered to lactating women unless in the judgement of a physician, the potential benefits outweigh the possible risks.Monitor patients with hepatic dysfunction for signs of CNS toxicity due to the extensive first pass metabolism of loperamide in the liver.If improvement in symptoms of acute diarrhea is not observed within 48 hours, discontinue the use of loperamide.Dependence Liability: Physical dependence to loperamide in humans has not been observed. However studies in morphine-dependent monkeys demonstrated that loperamide HCl at doses above those recommended for humans prevented signs of morphine withdrawal. However, in humans, the naloxone challenge pupil test, which when positive indicates opiate-like effects, performed after a single high dose, or after more than 2 years of therapeutic use of loperamide, was negative.Adverse Effects: The adverse effects reported in adults during clinical trials are difficult to distinguish from symptoms associated with the diarrheal syndrome. In adults, they were generally of a minor and self-limiting nature e.g., abdominal pain or discomfort; drowsiness or dizziness; tiredness; dry mouth; nausea and vomiting; hypersensitivity, including skin rash. Constipation and/or abdominal distension have also been reported. In some very rare cases, particularly in which the treatment information had not been respected, these effects have been associated with ileus. Opiate-like effects (CNS) have been observed in young children (under 3 years of age).Overdose: Symptoms: In case of overdosage (including relative overdosage due to hepatic dysfunction), CNS depression (stupor, coordination abnormality, somnolence, miosis, muscular hypertonia, respiratory depression) and ileus may occur. Children may be more sensitive to CNS effects than adults.In clinical trials, an adult who took three 20 mg doses within a 24-hour period was nauseated after the second dose and vomited after the third dose. In studies designed to examine the potential for side effects, intentional ingestion of up to 60 mg of loperamide in a single dose to healthy subjects resulted in no significant adverse effects.Treatment: If vomiting has not occurred, appropriate gastrointestinal decontamination should be carried out. Activated charcoal adsorbs loperamide. Clinical trials have demonstrated that a slurry of activated charcoal administered promptly after ingestion of loperamide can reduce the amount of drug which is absorbed into the systemic circulation by as much as 9-fold.In the event of overdosage, patients should be monitored for signs of CNS depression for at least 48 hours. If CNS depression is observed, naloxone may be administered. If responsive to naloxone, vital signs must be monitored carefully for recurrence of symptoms of drug overdose for at least 48 hours after the last dose of naloxone.In view of the prolonged action of loperamide and the short duration (1 to 3 hours) of naloxone, the patient must be monitored closely and treated repeatedly with naloxone as indicated. Since relatively little drug is excreted in the urine, forced diuresis is not expected to be effective for loperamide overdosage.Physicians should contact the regional Poison Control Centre for additional guidance about loperamide overdose management.Dosage: Adults: Acute Diarrhea: 4 mg initially, followed by 2 mg after each unformed stool. Clinical studies indicate that diarrheal control may be achieved after the initial dose in 50% of patients. Daily dosage should not exceed 16 mg.Chronic Diarrhea: 4 mg initially, followed by 2 mg after each unformed stool until diarrhea is controlled; thereafter the dosage should be reduced to meet individual requirements. When the optimal daily dosage has thus been established, this amount can be administered as a single daily dose or in divided doses.The average daily maintenance dosage used in clinical trials has been 4 to 8 mg. If improvement is not observed after treatment with 16 mg/day for 10 days, symptoms are unlikely to be controlled by further administration.Children: Acute or Chronic Diarrhea: Table I will usually fulfill initial dosage requirements for children.Following the first treatment day, it is recommended that subsequent doses (1 mg/10 kg body weight) be administered only after a loose stool.Duration of Treatment: Loperamide may be administered for prolonged periods of time. Blood, urine, liver and kidney function, ECG and ophthalmological examinations have revealed no significant abnormalities after several years of administration. No tolerance to the antidiarrheal effect has been observed. Naloxone pupil challenge studies in patients with chronic diarrhea who have received loperamide orally for prolonged periods indicate a lack of CNS effects.Supplied: Each light green elongated capsule shaped tablet contains: loperamide HCl 2 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: cellulose, colloidal silicon dioxide, D&C yellow No.10, dibasic calcium phosphate, FD&C blue No.1 and magnesium stearate. Bisulfites-, gluten-, lactose-, sodium- and tartrazine-free. Blister packs of 6, 12 or 18 (supplied by McNeil Consumer Products). HDPE bottles of 100 and 500 (supplied by Janssen-Ortho).(Shown in Product Recognition Section)
------------------Joe
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hi dunnyrunner, I like your name, do theysay dunny in England?, I lived there a long time ago and never heard it, but lately I'mlosing my memory. I think immodium plus hasan antacid in it, I remember reading the ingredients once to see if it was a combined d med. Most antacids will give you d, so Idon't know why they would add that to it.ellie.
 
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