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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone out there know if infants have been diagnosed with IBS? Do you suppose that IBS is the reason for babies who are said to be cholic babies? If you know of any resources along this line, please respond. Thanks
I personally was diagnosed with IBS about 12 years ago, and am well aware of the "breath taking" times of pain.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hi there,There is no true sure way to actually diagnose ibs, even in adults. Its more of like a term given when all tests have been done and have ruled out other GI illnesses and certain symptoms are present and others not. I cannot even imagine they do colonoscopies, upper GI's etc. to infants unless in extreme GI situations. Therefore they probably never "diagnose" infants with ibs because they technically cannot. Most pediatricians hate the word colic, because a lot of parents assume a constantly crying baby 'has colic'. don't quote me, but I believe I have heard that colic is another 'diagnosis' that is never truly diagnosed..more of a term like ibs. So maybe in an indirect way, adult ibs is similar to infant colic....any thoughts DocJ?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the response Laura. I was babysitting for a little fellow who is 2 months old and I could feel his stomach knot up into a ball and at other times I could feel 'ripple like actions in his abdomen. At these times he would draw up his legs and arms and cry out in pain. Other times he would extend his whole body and cry out. Any recommendation? I suggested to the Mom that she try a very bland diet for the next week or so, just to experiment.
 

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It does sound strange for an infant to have IBS.Anyway, it is correct that there is no way to diagnose it other than ruling other things out and it is also correct that colic is an ill-defined condition.However, infants can get a lot of things that don't appear in the adult like twisting of the intestine. I suspect that tests especially X-rays and endoscopies are probably more important because they cannot say where it hurts.[This message has been edited by flux (edited 08-31-98).]
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Laura-That was very well stated. Since functional disorders are subjective in nature, it's tough to make a diagnosis. Not being a pediatric gastroenterologist, I don't want to overextend, but in general the goal is to exclude structural or biochemical problems first (just as in adults). In this group that includes more congenital and heritable stuff than I see. Endoscopy is almost never performed in infants due to size and the need for general anesthesia. Barium studies (UGI,BE) are relied upon more.Once a functional problem is suspected, the management is similar to adults with respect to identifying triggers.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi EMH, my son had colic for almost 6 months and it was quite an ordeal. Basically my pediatrician said he was a healthy, thriving baby and that he would grow out of it when his body and mind were ready to. It is a very hard time for any parent but I made it through with a healthy happy son. I hope your friends baby gets over the colic soon. A
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
EMH:My son, too, was what they called colicky. He suffered terrible pain and was almost always constipated. You could see and feel his little belly in knots. He cried almost non-stop for months and I thought I'd lose my mind. My mother said I had been just the same as a baby.Fortunately, my daughter, born almost three years later than Paul, was the most agreeable child ever born, so don't give up.My son and I are both lactose intolerant, as is my mother and as was her father. I couldn't breastfeed Paul (big squooshy boobs, dry as a bone) so I had to use formula. Some kinds seemed better for him than others, and I'm sure that now there are even more varieties available. In retrospect, I wonder whether there was lactose in the formula that upset him.Now, here's the good news: He's 26 years old, healthy, happy and adventurous - and appears to have no sign of IBS. He's a vegetarian (but not a vegan) and eats a very high-fibre diet (lots of legumes and beans). He does seem to go to the loo a fair bit, but then his diet would do that to anyone, and he seems totally unstressed about it.A couple of years ago, he left Canada to go teach English at a university in Korea. On his holidays, he has travelled to Vietnam, Japan, Indonesia, China, India, Nepal, and other places I can't even remember. Toilets were holes in the ground, in a lot of those places.And this is the son of a woman who hates travel and wonders how she'll manage a trip to friends' cottage where there's an outhouse! I have no idea how he turned out this way - I guess the limb sometimes does fall a long way from the tree.
 
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