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http://naturalscience.com/ns/news/news25.html U. of Calgary researchers discover how sensory nerves are activated in inflammationFebruary 29, 2000: Researchers in the University of Calgary's Faculty of Medicine, along with a team of collaborators from three other countries, have reached a new understanding of how sensory nerve cells transmit their signals to the central nervous system, leading to inflammation and pain. The discovery made by the international research collaboration, including Morley Hollenberg, Nathalie Vergnolle and John Wallace, was published this month in Nature Medicine.The U of C scientists from the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics collaborated with colleagues from the United States, Italy and the United Kingdom. The study points to a novel mechanism for the activation of sensory nerves that have long been known to play a role in inflammation. These findings shed new light on how sensory nerve mechanisms function, potentially leading to new anti-inflammatory drugs and the treatment of pain."The strength of this study is that it involves researchers from so many different disciplines, allowing us to explore sensory nerves, inflammation and pain from a perspective that no one else has," says Hollenberg.The study illustrates that proteases coming from cells that are known to play a role in inflammation activate a new class of receptor (PAR2). These findings indicate that substances that block these receptors or the proteases that activate them would make good candidates for anti-inflammatory drugs, that could provide relief to those who suffer from arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and migraine headaches. All of these conditions are believed to involve a sensory nerve component.View editorial response in the British Medical Journal--------------------------------------------------------------------------------naturalSCIENCE invites comments or questions relating to this or any other item. Please direct correspondence to publisher###naturalscience.com.
 

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This probaly will have important implications to IBS.Did you read the rest spasman? http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/320/7231/334 Did you notice Mast cells?Nigel Bunnett is also connected to the UCLA center for neuroviceral science along with Lin Chang, M.D. and Emeran A. Mayer, M.D., the director of the center, which is a new state of the art research center, and they are very active in IBS research. You have already seen a lot of their work.Nigel Bunnett, M.D.Professor, Department of Surgery and Physiology, UCSF"The principal objective of my research is to understand the mechanisms of intercellular signaling and signal transduction by neuropeptides, proteases and their G-protein coupled receptors, and to define the contributions of these mediators to inflammatory diseases and pain transmission. I investigate these mechanisms using a reductionist approach at the molecular and cellular level, and by integrative studies using intact animals and experimental models of disease. "Emeran A. Mayer, M.D.Dr. Mayer has a longstanding interest in clinical and neurobiology aspects of brain-gut interactions in health and disease. He has published more than 110 original articles, numerous review articles and chapters, co-edited two books and organized several interdisciplinary symposia in this area. Dr. Mayer has made seminal contributions to the characterization of physiologic alterations in patients with functional disorders, in particular in the area of visceral pain, stress-induced visceral hyperalgesia and altered brain responses. He has two active R01 grants, one on basic mechanisms of NMDA receptors in visceral nociception, the other on brain and perceptual responses to visceral stimulation. He is P.I. on a subcontract of another RO1 grant on the role of proteinase-activated receptors in neuronal activation, and co-investigator on a RO1 grant (P.I. Lin Chang) dealing with neuroendocrine alteration in IBS and fibromyalgia. Dr. Mayer has served on the editorial boards of the leading journals in digestive diseases, including Gastroenterology, Gut, Digestion and the American Journal of Physiology. He has served as reviewer for a wide range of medical and neuroscience journals and as ad hoc reviewer for national and international funding agencies. He has also served on ad hoc NIH study sections.Dr. Mayer has been involved in an administrative and leadership function in several large interdisciplinary programs at UCLA. He is the Director of the UCLA Center for Neurovisceral Sciences & Women's Health (CNS), a translational research program recently funded by the NIH that is currently viewed as the leading integrated research program in the world in the area of functional digestive disorders. Senior investigators within the CNS perform a wide range of basic and clinical research activities in the area of neurovisceral interactions in health and disease. Research efforts of this program include the study of cellular and molecular mechanisms of chemo- and mechanotransduction of primary afferent nerves; animal studies on stress modulation of visceral pain and associated autonomic responses; human physiology studies on cerebral, autonomic, neuroendocrine, and perceptual responses to visceral stimulation; and health outcomes, quality of life, and epidemiological studies in populations suffering from chronic gastrointestinal disorders. The Center includes more than 15 M.D. and Ph.D. researchers who are supported by individual RO1 grants. Dr. Mayer is the Chair of the recently established UCLA Collaborative Centers for Integrative Medicine, a multidisciplinary and interdepartmental clinical and research program related to different aspects of integrative medicine. Dr. Mayer has trained close to 20 postdoctoral fellows and has played an active role in promoting an integrative model of mind/brain/body interactions in his clinical practice, lectures and publications. Along these lines, he has organized two seminal interdisciplinary symposia on different aspects of mind/brain/body interactions and has published a volume of Progress in Brain Research on this topic. http://www.ibs.med.ucla.edu/index.htm
 

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This probaly will have important implications to IBS.Did you read the rest spasman? http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/320/7231/334 Did you notice Mast cells?Nigel Bunnett is also connected to the UCLA center for neuroviceral science along with Lin Chang, M.D. and Emeran A. Mayer, M.D., the director of the center, which is a new state of the art research center, and they are very active in IBS research. You have already seen a lot of their work.Nigel Bunnett, M.D.Professor, Department of Surgery and Physiology, UCSF"The principal objective of my research is to understand the mechanisms of intercellular signaling and signal transduction by neuropeptides, proteases and their G-protein coupled receptors, and to define the contributions of these mediators to inflammatory diseases and pain transmission. I investigate these mechanisms using a reductionist approach at the molecular and cellular level, and by integrative studies using intact animals and experimental models of disease. "Emeran A. Mayer, M.D.Dr. Mayer has a longstanding interest in clinical and neurobiology aspects of brain-gut interactions in health and disease. He has published more than 110 original articles, numerous review articles and chapters, co-edited two books and organized several interdisciplinary symposia in this area. Dr. Mayer has made seminal contributions to the characterization of physiologic alterations in patients with functional disorders, in particular in the area of visceral pain, stress-induced visceral hyperalgesia and altered brain responses. He has two active R01 grants, one on basic mechanisms of NMDA receptors in visceral nociception, the other on brain and perceptual responses to visceral stimulation. He is P.I. on a subcontract of another RO1 grant on the role of proteinase-activated receptors in neuronal activation, and co-investigator on a RO1 grant (P.I. Lin Chang) dealing with neuroendocrine alteration in IBS and fibromyalgia. Dr. Mayer has served on the editorial boards of the leading journals in digestive diseases, including Gastroenterology, Gut, Digestion and the American Journal of Physiology. He has served as reviewer for a wide range of medical and neuroscience journals and as ad hoc reviewer for national and international funding agencies. He has also served on ad hoc NIH study sections.Dr. Mayer has been involved in an administrative and leadership function in several large interdisciplinary programs at UCLA. He is the Director of the UCLA Center for Neurovisceral Sciences & Women's Health (CNS), a translational research program recently funded by the NIH that is currently viewed as the leading integrated research program in the world in the area of functional digestive disorders. Senior investigators within the CNS perform a wide range of basic and clinical research activities in the area of neurovisceral interactions in health and disease. Research efforts of this program include the study of cellular and molecular mechanisms of chemo- and mechanotransduction of primary afferent nerves; animal studies on stress modulation of visceral pain and associated autonomic responses; human physiology studies on cerebral, autonomic, neuroendocrine, and perceptual responses to visceral stimulation; and health outcomes, quality of life, and epidemiological studies in populations suffering from chronic gastrointestinal disorders. The Center includes more than 15 M.D. and Ph.D. researchers who are supported by individual RO1 grants. Dr. Mayer is the Chair of the recently established UCLA Collaborative Centers for Integrative Medicine, a multidisciplinary and interdepartmental clinical and research program related to different aspects of integrative medicine. Dr. Mayer has trained close to 20 postdoctoral fellows and has played an active role in promoting an integrative model of mind/brain/body interactions in his clinical practice, lectures and publications. Along these lines, he has organized two seminal interdisciplinary symposia on different aspects of mind/brain/body interactions and has published a volume of Progress in Brain Research on this topic. http://www.ibs.med.ucla.edu/index.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What that mean? http://www.docguide.com/news/content.nsf/n...irritable,bowel Inflammatory Changes Seen in Irritable Bowel Chronic Pelvic PainA DGReview of :"Neurogenic inflammation and chronic pelvic pain"World Journal of Urology10/05/2001By Elda HauschildtInflammatory changes are seen in irritable bowel syndrome patients who have chronic pelvic pain.No etiology has been identified for this type of pain."These inflammatory changes might be due to neurogenic inflammation," North American researchers say. "Chronic pelvic pain is a puzzling disease entity," they suggest. "Pathophysiological mechanisms of chronic pelvic pain are not clear, and current treatment strategies are often not successful, leaving patients as well as health-care providers frustrated."Investigators from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland,m United States point out that chronic pelvic pain is observed in other conditions as well as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). These conditions include interstitial cystitis, vulvar vestibulitis, prostatodynia/prostatitis and loin pain/hematuria syndrome.They say that applying the concept of neurogenic inflammation to chronic pelvic pain in such conditions "provides new insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms of these pain syndromes."It also makes it possible for doctors to account for the heterogeneity and variability observed in clinical presentations of the various illnesses.Use of the neurogenic inflammation concept may lead to development of novel therapies for IBS and other patients, they add. World Journal of Urology, 2001; 19: 180-185 "Neurogenic inflammation and chronic pelvic pain"
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What that mean? http://www.docguide.com/news/content.nsf/n...irritable,bowel Inflammatory Changes Seen in Irritable Bowel Chronic Pelvic PainA DGReview of :"Neurogenic inflammation and chronic pelvic pain"World Journal of Urology10/05/2001By Elda HauschildtInflammatory changes are seen in irritable bowel syndrome patients who have chronic pelvic pain.No etiology has been identified for this type of pain."These inflammatory changes might be due to neurogenic inflammation," North American researchers say. "Chronic pelvic pain is a puzzling disease entity," they suggest. "Pathophysiological mechanisms of chronic pelvic pain are not clear, and current treatment strategies are often not successful, leaving patients as well as health-care providers frustrated."Investigators from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland,m United States point out that chronic pelvic pain is observed in other conditions as well as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). These conditions include interstitial cystitis, vulvar vestibulitis, prostatodynia/prostatitis and loin pain/hematuria syndrome.They say that applying the concept of neurogenic inflammation to chronic pelvic pain in such conditions "provides new insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms of these pain syndromes."It also makes it possible for doctors to account for the heterogeneity and variability observed in clinical presentations of the various illnesses.Use of the neurogenic inflammation concept may lead to development of novel therapies for IBS and other patients, they add. World Journal of Urology, 2001; 19: 180-185 "Neurogenic inflammation and chronic pelvic pain"
 

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DOR BioPharma Options Intellectual Property for the Use of Oral Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Positions orBec� for Billion Dollar IBS MarketLake Forest, IL � September 26, 2002, DOR BioPharma Inc. (AMEX: DOR) (�DOR�) announced today that it has executed an exclusive option with the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) to license patent applications covering the use of oral luminally active anti-inflammatory drugs, such as orBec� (oral beclomethasone diproprionate), for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Dr. Jay Pasricha, Director of the Gastroenterology and Hepatology Division at UTMB stated, �The role that subtle gastrointestinal inflammation plays in IBS is only beginning to be appreciated. Recent evidence suggests that many cases of IBS may be driven by the persistence of immunocompetent cells in the bowel wall. Luminally active anti-inflammatory corticosteroids with minimal or no systemic effects, such as orBec�, therefore represent a logical and attractive approach for treating what may be a substantial portion of IBS sufferers�. As part of this development program, UTMB will test orBec� in post-colitis animal models of functional bowel pain developed by Dr. Pasricha�s laboratory. This model closely mimics the symptoms of IBS.DOR stated, �IBS affects approximately 25 to 55 million patients per year in the U.S. and represents a significant market opportunity for orBec� beyond intestinal GVHD. Current therapies are purely symptomatic and often unsatisfactory. Treatment with orBec�, at least in some patients, may be curative and therefore much more desirable. While our pivotal Phase III clinical trial of orBec� for the Fast-Track indication of intestinal GVHD continues with accelerating enrollment, we are eager to explore the potential of orBec� in follow-on indications such as the billion dollar IBS market. The licensure of this intellectual property may ultimately secure orBec� as the exclusive anti-inflammatory in this lucrative market segment.� About Irritable Bowel SyndromeIrritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is also known as irritable colon and spastic colon. IBS causes lower abdominal pain and discomfort, urgency and irregular bowel habits, such as diarrhea or constipation. In some people IBS causes mostly constipation; in others, mostly diarrhea; some people have alternating periods of diarrhea and constipation.According to the International Foundation for Bowel Dysfunction (IFBD), IBS affects at least 10-15% of adults, and is second only to the common cold as a cause of absenteeism from work. IBS costs the U.S. healthcare system approximately $30 billion annually in direct and indirect costs. IBS results in 2.5 to 3.5 million yearly visits to physicians and approximately 20 to 40 percent of all visits to gastroenterologists are due to IBS symptoms. For recent information, see; Talley N, Spiller R, Irritable bowel syndrome: a little understood organic bowel disease? The Lancet, Vol. 360: 555-64 (Aug. 17, 2002).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
DOR BioPharma Options Intellectual Property for the Use of Oral Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Positions orBec� for Billion Dollar IBS MarketLake Forest, IL � September 26, 2002, DOR BioPharma Inc. (AMEX: DOR) (�DOR�) announced today that it has executed an exclusive option with the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) to license patent applications covering the use of oral luminally active anti-inflammatory drugs, such as orBec� (oral beclomethasone diproprionate), for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Dr. Jay Pasricha, Director of the Gastroenterology and Hepatology Division at UTMB stated, �The role that subtle gastrointestinal inflammation plays in IBS is only beginning to be appreciated. Recent evidence suggests that many cases of IBS may be driven by the persistence of immunocompetent cells in the bowel wall. Luminally active anti-inflammatory corticosteroids with minimal or no systemic effects, such as orBec�, therefore represent a logical and attractive approach for treating what may be a substantial portion of IBS sufferers�. As part of this development program, UTMB will test orBec� in post-colitis animal models of functional bowel pain developed by Dr. Pasricha�s laboratory. This model closely mimics the symptoms of IBS.DOR stated, �IBS affects approximately 25 to 55 million patients per year in the U.S. and represents a significant market opportunity for orBec� beyond intestinal GVHD. Current therapies are purely symptomatic and often unsatisfactory. Treatment with orBec�, at least in some patients, may be curative and therefore much more desirable. While our pivotal Phase III clinical trial of orBec� for the Fast-Track indication of intestinal GVHD continues with accelerating enrollment, we are eager to explore the potential of orBec� in follow-on indications such as the billion dollar IBS market. The licensure of this intellectual property may ultimately secure orBec� as the exclusive anti-inflammatory in this lucrative market segment.� About Irritable Bowel SyndromeIrritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is also known as irritable colon and spastic colon. IBS causes lower abdominal pain and discomfort, urgency and irregular bowel habits, such as diarrhea or constipation. In some people IBS causes mostly constipation; in others, mostly diarrhea; some people have alternating periods of diarrhea and constipation.According to the International Foundation for Bowel Dysfunction (IFBD), IBS affects at least 10-15% of adults, and is second only to the common cold as a cause of absenteeism from work. IBS costs the U.S. healthcare system approximately $30 billion annually in direct and indirect costs. IBS results in 2.5 to 3.5 million yearly visits to physicians and approximately 20 to 40 percent of all visits to gastroenterologists are due to IBS symptoms. For recent information, see; Talley N, Spiller R, Irritable bowel syndrome: a little understood organic bowel disease? The Lancet, Vol. 360: 555-64 (Aug. 17, 2002).
 
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