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Is this stuff supposed to act fairly quickly? how long should i take them before deciding they arent helping if they arent? just wondering, think i feel a bit better but still not great...
 

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I think they tend to be more along the lines of either they work or they do not fairly quickly (give it like a 2 week trial usually to see if it is different)One thing to remember, is that often there is not one single thing that makes you 100% totally normal every moment of every day.But things that make you somewhat better most of the time may be worth keeping up with. It may mean you need to add in something else.Sometimes if you find a few things that work some of the time and put them together you may get good control most of the time.K.
 

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Presently taking the following in mega doses doses Acidophilus;Aloe Vera Gel;DGL - Licorice;Also taking Provex CVUsing coconut oil in all food preparation.The relief was provided by the first 3 in combination - with the Aloe Vera providing the most relief. The first day I drank almost a gallon of Aloe Vera Juice, then switched to the Gel.Began to feel much better after the first day.By taking the above along with discipline in my eating habits, my life has returned almost to normal. Previously suffered from stomach pain, bloating,pain in my left side,constipation,fatigue, and inability to sleep. I was also nervous and irritable.I have had IBS since 1999 and probably before and have come to realize this condition will be with me the rest of my life. Hope this helps,
 

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Taking Aloe Vera over a long term is not advisable. see report. Magnesium oxide would be a safer bet, & far less harmful. Aloe Vera & I.B.S Because aloe is well-known as a gentle external treatment for minor burns and skin irritations, it's easy to assume that it would be safe for use internally as well. This is not necessarily true. Even though aloe vera is a plant, and thus "natural", it is still classified by the FDA as a Class 1 harsh stimulant laxative. There are substances called anthroquinones and anthrones in aloe, which produce a laxative effect by increasing colonic peristalsis and intestinal water content, by opening chloride channels of the colonic membrane to cause a net reduction of liquid absorption by the colon.In plain English, this means that aloe causes faster and stronger contractions of the colon - something that people with IBS are already overly prone to, and which can cause violent abdominal cramps, painful spasms, and diarrhea. The safety of aloe is another concern. All anthranoid laxatives (not just aloe, but senna and cascara sagrada as well) can cause melanosis coli, cathartic colon, and possibly increase the risk of colonic cancer. (In fact, genotoxicity studies show that aloe-containing laxatives pose cancer risks to humans even when used as directed.) Melanosis coli, normally a benign condition, is characterized by black pigmentation of the colonic wall, and is almost always attributable to anthranoid laxatives such as aloe, cascara, or senna. Melanosis coli usually develops 9 months after initiating the use of anthranoid laxatives, and typically disappears just as quickly after the drug is discontinued. In severe cases, however, it may reduce bowel function and make constipation worse. In advanced cases of melanosis coli, the inside lining of the colon becomes pitch black instead of the normal light pink. Cathartic colon is the anatomic and physiologic change in the colon that occurs with chronic use of stimulant laxatives such as aloe (chronic use is defined as more than 3 times per week for at least 1 year). Signs and symptoms of cathartic colon include chronic constipation, bloating, a feeling of fullness, abdominal pain, and incomplete fecal evacuation. Radiologic studies of a patient with cathartic colon will show: an atonic colon (the colon lacks the normal muscle tone) and a redundant colon (the laxative use has stretched out the colon to twice the normal length, and the bowel has developed redundant coils of bowel tubing that loop back and forth in the abdominal cavity). As if this isn't bad enough, chronic use of aloe can also lead to serious medical consequences such as fluid and electrolyte imbalance, steatorrhea, gastroenteropathy, osteomalacia, and vitamin and mineral deficiencies. When aloe is discontinued, radiographic and functional changes in the colon may only partially return to normal because of permanent drug-induced neuromuscular damage to the colon. What's really scary about aloe is that it's a very common ingredient in all sorts of liquid vitamins, energy boost drinks, and other health supplements, and these product labels won't note that aloe is a laxative. Aloe is even specifically marketed to people with IBS as a "digestive aid", or "soothing to the bowel", with an emphasis on the fact that it's an all-natural plant ingredient, which again just hides the fact that it is without a doubt a harsh stimulant laxative. At this point, products derived from aloe gel and intended for internal use have not been proven effective against any disease or disorder, but the dangers seem clear. I would err on the side of caution and avoid aloe altogether, as it seems to me that its well-established risks far outweigh any potential (and as yet unproven) benefits. ---------------------------------------------There are many products now on the market which contain Aloe, & I believe the last count for actual companies that bottle the juice from the plant, or buy it in bulk is now around 287 world wide!There is no doubt whatsoever that when used topically on burns, scalds, & even sun-burn, Aloe certainly helps the area affected to heal rapidly, & because of those qualities I always have a plant by the back door for this purpose, but by the evidence now available such as mentioned above, I must ask you this question: Will you be consuming Aloe in any form now knowing of these risks?? I CERTAINLY WILL NOT. Dave Fergusson. HEALTH IS WEALTH TEAM
 

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slipery elm is a very old way to treat stomach complaints as it lines the stomach adn intestines... for those of yus who have trouble with alliums (onion family) slippery elm is good. I know alot of normal peple that swear by slippery elm and im considering taking it now even though it looks like its going to taste horrible lol
 

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Slippery Elm provides great soothing musilage for the whole G.I tract. The North American Indians have used Slippery elm for centuries for this purpose & also during periods of drought as it is also a nutritious food. This makes it ideal for children who have gastro & cannot keep anything else down. It is recommended to mix the powder with water ,but this is not easy to do,as dry pockets often prevail. I have found that mixing the powder with increasing amounts of rice milk or soy milk till there is a nice even paste is easier before stirring in hot water. You can add honey, cinnamon, ginger powder or even cocoa providing you are not allergic to them. My daughter as a child actually preferred Slippery elm as a cereal to many of those available.Slippery Elm will coat the G.I tract for up to 36 hours so it is usually not necessary to take it every day.
 

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You really have to check out any information you get from people at supplement stores as the quality of advice can really vary a lot.http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/html/11570.cfm is a good resource although it focuses on herbs that are used by cancer patients it covers a lot of commonly used herbs.I've never heard it causes spasms. Most people here find it either does nothing or it helps. Really haven't seen much that it makes it worse.Now fiber bothers some IBSers and this can count as fiber, but I can't see any reason to think it would spasm you up. It is traditionally used for diarrhea.
 

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slippery elm has been used for centuries and its in stupidly old natural healing books i forget what its called. slippery elm cured my moms friends IBS and all she does now is takes this a few days a week and eats wha she likes... we only found this out yesterday that she took it and it helped so its worth a try... the only way i could think it would give you spasms wouldbe if it didnt suit you but then you have to try things for better and worse!
 
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