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I've had virtually constant pain since the summer, only had a few days off.As this bout started with a yeast infection I decided to stop eating bread over a week ago. 36 hours after stopping the pain went. I even ate really late last night - corned beef and pickle which normally would have nearly killed me and I feel fine.I've been eating crackers instead and don't miss the bread.Could be a coincidence as I have also been a lot calmer lately. Anyone else experience this?
 

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If I eat bread, cupcakes, cake , buns etc I get indegetion real bad.Hope you feel betterKat
 

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A few months ago I was finding that whenever I ate bread I ended up with a dull tummy ache for a few hours afterwards so I tried eating yeast free bread and it made a huge difference (only after lunch with the dull ache though, not with the rest of my IBS). I've just started putting it back into my diet and seem fine with it now. Don't know what happened but I guess my body just decided it didn't like yeast for a while. But if it helps you stick with it (try buying some yeast free bread, it's not quite as good as normal bread but still pretty okay for when you want a sandwhich).
 

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No, you don't have to have celiac disease. You can be gluten intolerant which may in some individuals lead to celiac. You can have the celiac gene but not test positive for celiac. There are many variables. My blood tests were negative, so my doctor was reluctant to have the endoscopy done. I went on the gluten-free diet in June 2005 with no expectations. I just wanted to give everything a try and not let IBS be the end. I saw my doctor in October and she was very happy with the improvements in my health, and said that going back on gluten just for the test would not be advisable and the diet was answer enough that gluten was a problem. Back in the day celiac testing was done by the dietary change alone. Celiac and non-celiac gluten intolerance is actually quite common. I just want to let people know that this dietary change is worth trying for a few months to see if there is a difference, and it won't hurt you to try it. But if you need/want a diagnosis then you must eat gluten.
 

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However eating crackers is probably not eliminating gluten. They are usually made with wheat flour. I have a friend with celiac. A single cracker (wheat thin, saltine, trisket, etc.) would cause severe symptoms. Bread is not the only source of gluten in the diet.Not sure why you would be OK with crackers but not bread other than the volume of wheat flour might be lower in a couple of crackers vs a slice of bread. (edit to add, you might check the ingredient list of the crackers vs the bread you usually eat and see if the bread has something like high fructose corn syrup or other additive, etc. that the crackers do not)It could be reducing the load of resistant starch by eating less flour at one time might be what is going on. (Depending of course on how many crackers you ate, now if they are gluten free crackers that are not made with wheat or rye or any of the other problem grains just ignore these comments).K.
 
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