Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Health Support Forum banner
1 - 20 of 55 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This may be a new question, but does IBS afflict the races/ethnic groups similarly? Wondering if caucasions are worse off, or is it that they talk more openly about the problem? Some of my friends who are foreign born from some of the less developed parts of the world seem to have cast iron stomachs. I mean, they can drink water anywhere and never have to worry. Do some of them have a genetic advantage from eating and drinking a more "contaminated" diet over the ages?Skeeter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,398 Posts
We don�t have good answers for this because the survey studies have not paid careful attention to it, but the existing data seem to say by far and away IBS affects women more than men, except in India where the ratio is reversed. Blacks and whites seem affected equally, and they more so than Hispanics. IBS is all over Europe, Japan, China and South America, but Ugandans don�t seem to get it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,922 Posts
From the reading I've done they say that the diets in Africa are much higher in fiber than in the Western world, and they think that may account for less IBS. I think I read in one book the estimate of fiber eaten in Africa is 50 grams per day.The typical American consumes only 10-15 grams of fiber a day, when we need 25-35 a day. We eat mainly processed foods in which most of the fiber has been removed. White, enriched flour has only 1 gram of fiber per serving, while whole wheat has 4. I use all different types of whole grains and avoid white as much as possible. Jean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,847 Posts
Skeeter, here is what Gershon in the book The Second Brain has to say about this:"Most of the early studies of IBS suggested that it was predominantly a disease of the white middle class. It is likely, however, that this impression was gained because the subjects of the first studies of the prevalence of IBS were not drawn from a random sample of the entire population but mainly from middle-class whites, who happened to be the people most likely to be seeking treatment. More recent studies of Hispanic and black Americans, as well as of populations in Japan and China, also report prevalences of about 20 percent, which are very similar to those found in middle-class white America. The prevalance of IBS thus seems to be independent of race, although there is some evidence that it may be affected by socioeconomic class and gender. An Iranian clinic, which treats nomads and industrial loaborers, has found that the prevalence of IBS in these people (3.5 percent) is much lower than that reported in middle-class groups. In Western societies, women are more likely to suffer from IBS than men, with the ratio of women to men of up to 2:1. Interestingly, this ratio is reversed in India, where men go to doctors more than women, and also report more IBS."------------------
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
This is an interesting topic, and I personally have know idea and would like to know? However, the tolerance for pain is lower in the states then the rest of the world,face it were wimps kindof. Just something I thought I would throw in there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
My stepfather was Asian, and he always had serious C and painful bloating and gas. He and my mom are divorced now, and I haven't seen him in years. I know now that he has IBS, but his condition didn't have a name at the time he was with us.I have been teaching for 14 years at a predominantly black commuter college. About 90% of my students and co-workers are African-American. My personal observation has been that many black people with GI problems use over-the-counter or folk remedies to treat symptoms, especially "C", where whites seem more likely to go to a doctor for diagnosis and/or treatment. This is not in any way a value judgement--simply my perception of a cultural difference.Debbie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
820 Posts
Well, I'm a Black female who does have IBS and I know of others who have it and are treated regularly by a dr. With my mother having died of colon cancer it did open my eyes to an awareness of what goes on with the colon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Patty thanks for that info
! It is my understanding that the majority of Blacks have lactose problems and I think Asians do to,if so, it is one more thing to consider? Patty, are you lactose intolerant? Am I right about that assumption? This is interesting,especially when you consider the whole world population as opposed to the western world.PS I hope saying Black is okay, where we are at these days with "politically correct" is confusing, one of my best and dearest friends is black although I have many, but I just call him Brion.LOL No offence by using that word, I am just confused about it a little and am wondering.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm also an African-American female and just about everyone in my family has some kind of digestive problem. On top of being mostly IBS-C, I am extremely lactose intolerant - I can't even eat beef w/o getting sick. I also know of some Asian(American) people who have IBS but they don't call it that; they just say stomach- digestive problems. I personally think the reason people in other countries don't get (or you don't hear of many people getting) IBS -except in Britain- is because their diet and habits in many ways is much better than ours especially since their food is not dependant on artificial colors, flavors, etc. . . and other "harmless" chemicals put in or on food. I truly believe that had my diet been based on whole, natural foods from the beginning I would not have my digestive problems or at least it wouldn't be so pronounced. Plus, people in other countries aren't as lazy(physically) and overeating as Americans. Of course that's been changing gradually over the past couple of years, still they "exercise" more than Americans even if it's just walking or bicycling and drinking various amounts of alcohol w/ each meal probably helps too (at least with heart disease). How, what, when, and with whom they eat also seems to contribute to their low occurence of not only IBS but also many degenerative diseases.I know they've done studies on the degenerative disease area but it probably directly effects IBS too.------------------"It's no use worrying about the things you can solve; no use worrying about the things you can't."
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
LawStudent,If I didn't welcome you before now, I would like to now. It is nice to know what gender, race, etc. everyone is....Patty...Where are your recipes????------------------LET'S ALL PRAY FOR A CURE TO THIS IBS SOON!BETTIE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Patty-I hope my post didn't offend you or anyone else. I know from experience that cultural differences are a difficult thing to discuss, and this medium makes it even more awkward. The difficult thing about it is that it involves generalizing, when obviously every member of a group is an individual. It's a shame, because I think that not talking openly about these things just widens the cultural gap.Debbie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
820 Posts
No Debbie, it would take a lot more than your comments to offend me. You were just expressing an observation.eric, I personally prefer to be called Black because I am a Black American female. But, I am NOT lactose intolerant. My previous dr. made that assumption based on statistics, I suppose, even though I was telling him that I eat ice cream and drink milk, eat yogurt daily and have no problem. He wanted to put me on a schedule to check for it and I thought it was a waste of time, which is why I changed drs.Underneath it all, let's face it guys, we're all the same!Lawstudent, it's nice to meet you. I thought I was the only sister here. *smile*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Thanks Patty,really no offence to anyone,we all have color or we would be invisable.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
New to board- I am predominantly caucasian (most probably English and Irish) with probable Sioux (my maternal great great great grandmother) and Black African(my paternal great great great grandmother). Face it, I'm just a crazy mixed up American, and then I married a Russian! so my kids are nearly Global Americans. But I have C-IBS and have wondered about the genetics. good topic.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, my mother and her whole family is from Mexico, My father is from Cuba and his father Chinese- my father seems to have frequent D, I don't know if it's IBS though. He's a health but, he drinks green tea and takes multivitamin supplements lol. I thought my mother might have IBS because she complains of stomachaches and D quite often, but it might also be her typical mexican diet
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
820 Posts
Well, if we speak of heritage mine involves a mixture of things. My father's grandfather was white and our skin tone depicts it; my mother's side has the Indian ancestors with high cheek bones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
This is cool. Not that it matters, but it's nice to know that we have such a mixture of races here. That's one nice thing about a BB like this - we are all gray! *LOL*Anyway, I knew Patty was Black because she posted that on the "How 'bout we all describe ourselves thread." She said "You mean I am the only Black here....!" I can just see her saying that *L*I have thought a lot about this, and heritage doesn't seem to mean much anymore in our global society. BTW, welcome Sans! Truely a global hodge podge in your family, eh? I am only second generation Norwegian, but am full blooded Norske. That doesn't mean a thing tho, since I live, breath and eat here in the good ol' USA. And, as flux mentioned, I don't think any studies have ever been done on ethnicity.Anyway, interesting thread!------------------If you learn from your suffering, and really come to understand the lesson you were taught, you might be able to help someone else who's now in the phase you may have just completed. Maybe that's what it's all about after all...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
I don't know if my step-father suffered from IBS, but he did have colon cancer and had his colon removed in the early 90's. I believe has was lactose intolerant. He passed away this past April at age 63. My father was full-blooded Mohawk Indian, born and raised on the Six Nation Iriquois Indian Reservation in Ontario Canada. I, myself, am what my family calls a Heinz 57, have a little bit of everything in me.
Irish, German, Welsh, etc...Lena
 
1 - 20 of 55 Posts
Top