Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Health Support Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if there are any good information sites for Celiac? I've found the following description of someone who mentioned they had IBS. I know there are some links like celiac.com but it seems hard to get the complete picture of this. BN.COM only seems to have older books....Can I test for this by simply avoiding all flour, or are certain flours okay? Thanks :)Personal story of a diagnosed Celiac I suffer from IBS (Irritable bowel syndrome), or at least I did. I had all the symptoms, and for as long as I can remember I thought that that was normal. It's not a topic that often gets discussed in general conversation.Ten years ago the discomfort and inconvenience got to the point where even I could no longer accept that they might be normal and visits to the doctor started.These might have been more use had I known what to tell the doctor, or if he knew the right questions to ask. As it was I complained of persistent diarrhoea and the doctor prescribed a drug to slow the passage of food through the digestive system. The result was immediate intense agony. It felt as though the whole of my intestine was on fire. It seemed clear to me that the diarrhoea must result from the digestive system trying to remove something irritating from inside, and slowing its passage through the system made it ten times worse. The doctor was not convinced.I stopped taking the medicine and put up with the discomfort for several months. Then pain and discomfort in the rectum got to be beyond a joke.Another young doctor examined me and diagnosed the problem as a tight anal sphincter. At least he could do something about this, but agreed that it didn't account for all my other digestive symptoms. After another wait to see the specialist, I got the summons for an internal investigation. This started with the instructions to eat nothing at all and drink only water for two days. I was resigned to a period of greater discomfort in the hope that there might be lesser discomfort in the future.But the result was not what I expected. By the end of the first day's starvation I began to feel fit and well. By the end of the second day almost all my symptoms had disappeared without trace!When they wheeled me through for examination I felt fitter than I could remember. I still felt fit when I lay in bed recovering from the anaesthetic. I stayed free of any symptoms until I ate some bread. Then my abdomen swelled up like a balloon and I felt decidedly unwell.The medical conclusion was that my digestive system could not tolerate wheat flour. I was coeliac.I was prescribed gluten-free bread but found it unpalatable. I had eaten rice without any problems and for the next month this came to dominate my diet.I was horrified when all my symptoms started to return. My doctor consulted his books, but beyond suggesting a further internal investigation, could offer no help.I was a teacher of Human Biology, teaching a lot of food chemistry, and had sent several of my students off to train to be doctors. A crash course of study of my digestive system seemed essential.The local librarian quickly discovered for me that the principal medical textbook on food allergy and intolerance is co-authored by Dr Brostoff and a layman's introduction to the subject was provided by 'The Complete guide to Food Allergy and Intolerance' by Dr Jonathan Brostoff and Linda Gamlin, published by Bloomsbury.I soon learnt that my present narrow diet was the worst way to proceed. Although I was unable to eat any wheat, oats, rye or barley, I must broaden my diet as much as possible, or my immune system could well start reacting to any other food that was in my digestive system all the time.My problem was made more complicated because I already knew that Jerusalem artichokes make me violently sick. Sunflower seeds and lettuce are both closely related to Jerusalem and perhaps these also contributed to my symptoms.I ran into another problem when I tried to add soya to my diet. It always left me very queasy. Further research revealed that in some studies 15% of those who react to wheat cannot tolerate soya products. Now I don't eat any manufactured foods because I don't know what they might contain, and I don't need them anyway.I ended up with the following list of starchy foods that form the basis of my diet: Potato, corn (maize), rice, millet, sorghum, teff, sago, tapioca, banana, sweet chestnut, buckwheat, quinnoa and amaranth.Now I eat two meals a day based on starch, fruit and vegetables and one meal a day based on meat or fish with non-starchy vegetables and fruit. I use olive oil or butter for cooking (but not too much). I try to eat a different starch food for every starch meal, and as wide a range of vegetables and fruit as I can find. I drink hot water for most meals and three cups of tea but no coffee a day. I also limit myself to one glass of wine per day. When I stick to this diet all my IBS symptoms disappear.This is a very healthy diet and I can commend it to anyone who wants to try it.It took me several years to discover how to cook with all these different natural ingredients, but I have done all the hard work for you. Headway are publishing my book, Gluten-free Cookery. The Complete Guide for Gluten-free or Wheat-free Diets in March 1995. My researches have highlighted many other fascinating items that may help others suffering from IBS.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
By the way, the above account was written by someone on a www site. It is not me. But I am curious why the doctors never tested me for this, or if it is possible to test...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
I definitely improved when I removed wheat, oats, and barley from my diet, although it did not get rid of my IBS. Now when I eat wheat I notice that my stomach bloats. There is a blood test for this, but the best way to check is to cut it out from your diet. I have tested negative to many foods that bother me--I think only bad reactions show up. There is also a biopsy or something like that of the intestine that they do to test for celiac that is more accurate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
There are several tests for celiac but only one is conclusive, thats a biospy of the small intestine. I had this test done a few weeks ago but my appointment with the GI is not untill August. I would think if it were postive he would have called me but it doesn't really matter as I am on a gluten free diet anyway. He told me he did not think it was celiac but advised me to stay on a gluten free diet as it improved my symtoms dramaticaly.sicofsick
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Try www.enterolab.com This is a new lab set up by a doctor doing research at Baylor University Medical Center.He claims his new test for Gluten Sensitivity is more accurate. Also other tests i.e. gene testing.Hope this will help.Next month when I see my PCP, I'm going to copy this info and see if he will refer me for these tests so my insurance will pay for them?------------------BJV/Female__(D)
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Has anyone else used this service for testing?Is it reliable? The www site does not seem to share information about how reliable this test is... I guess that is why I am a bit skeptical. Any clues/ideas?
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
a couple years ago, there was a guy who kept visiting our endometriosis board and pushing gluten free stuff, said we ALL were at risk and would develop celiac fi we continued to eat it. Turned out he sold gluten free products and was using 'scare tactics' to get people to buy them. Since then, i've always been leery of 'testamonials'. just my two cents....------------------Color Rainbows in the Rain
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top