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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello- I am sorry about the last post--I am new to the board and hit the wrong button! I have IBS-D and have a strange question. Does anyone have diarrhea/pain after eating meat? Chicken did me in last week and I still haven't recovered. I tried a small amount of tender pot roast last night and was in the bathroom 30 minutes later! I usually know my boundaries, but this seems to be a new problem. Has anyone cut meat out altogther? And, if so, has it helped? Thanks for your help. Stephanie
 

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Meat is quite high fat and that often affects a IBS-D seems to be a common trigger. I can tolerate chicken ok but meat is a problem usually run immediately or get hit with D the next day I indulge occasionally but then its a small piece and not often its taken the fun out of eating meat so I rather stick to chicken.
 

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Meat is quite high fat and that often affects a IBS-D seems to be a common trigger. I can tolerate chicken ok but meat is a problem usually run immediately or get hit with D the next day I indulge occasionally but then its a small piece and not often its taken the fun out of eating meat so I rather stick to chicken.
 

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Hi StephanieEveryone seems to be different as to what they can and can't eat so it's difficult to say if cutting out meat will work for youI cut out meat altogether about 3 years ago (for moral rather than other reasons though to be honest). I am still suffering but my problem seemed to stem from what it was being cooked with rather than the meat itself. - Onions are the main problem for me. Also some cooking oils seem to bring a reaction.Have you tried having the meat on its own to see if you still get the same problem. If not you may be cooking it with something that maybe you haven't realised could be a trigger. Or maybe it's a case of having something with your meal to aid the digestion of the meal itself? I take peppermint capsules (which work for me) if I don't know what I am being served up when I go out.Try excluding different things from your diet. Unfortunately, from experience its often a case of your own trial and error to find your trigger points!Good luck locating yours!
N.B. Quite a few people are trying this latest thing of food intolerance testing which is available in some health food stores in the UK abd I'm sure in the States. I haven't gone down that road yet and don't know if they are worth doing....?????
 

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Hi StephanieEveryone seems to be different as to what they can and can't eat so it's difficult to say if cutting out meat will work for youI cut out meat altogether about 3 years ago (for moral rather than other reasons though to be honest). I am still suffering but my problem seemed to stem from what it was being cooked with rather than the meat itself. - Onions are the main problem for me. Also some cooking oils seem to bring a reaction.Have you tried having the meat on its own to see if you still get the same problem. If not you may be cooking it with something that maybe you haven't realised could be a trigger. Or maybe it's a case of having something with your meal to aid the digestion of the meal itself? I take peppermint capsules (which work for me) if I don't know what I am being served up when I go out.Try excluding different things from your diet. Unfortunately, from experience its often a case of your own trial and error to find your trigger points!Good luck locating yours!
N.B. Quite a few people are trying this latest thing of food intolerance testing which is available in some health food stores in the UK abd I'm sure in the States. I haven't gone down that road yet and don't know if they are worth doing....?????
 

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HiI have found that certain foods play a huge part in my IBS-D...For me afterworking with Leap I found out that apple, coconut, benzoic acid, mustard,cottage chesse and a few others could be my IBS-D worse...afterI stopped putting those things in my body I really improved... I though whatdo I have to loose by staying away from them and after a few weeks I stoppedgoing to the bathroom, have not felt sick one time..and alot of the othersymptoms started to go away......I hope you start feeling better real soon...Welcome to the BB
 

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HiI have found that certain foods play a huge part in my IBS-D...For me afterworking with Leap I found out that apple, coconut, benzoic acid, mustard,cottage chesse and a few others could be my IBS-D worse...afterI stopped putting those things in my body I really improved... I though whatdo I have to loose by staying away from them and after a few weeks I stoppedgoing to the bathroom, have not felt sick one time..and alot of the othersymptoms started to go away......I hope you start feeling better real soon...Welcome to the BB
 

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I have often wondered is meat gets a bad name for two reasons:1) gall bladder problems2) emotional problems and/or ethical choices that make one sick upon just seeing meat.( I get sick looking at those consuming squid and bug larva. I'll freely admit that it is an emotional problem and not at all based upon logic. However, I still feel sick about it)I'm not saying that here are not other potential problems with meat, but it seems like a declaring meat as "evil" is a bit of a stretch. Some people also get sick on soy products. Does that mean soy is physically or ethically bad? How about peanuts? I was reading a Washington Post article on vegitarians and vegans. Vegans are those who will not eat meat or products which are obtained from animals in an "inhumane" way. That exclusion includes dairy products and eggs.I couldn't help wondering out loud if the vegans use hair shampoo and conditioners which are loaded with animal fats or candles which often come from rendered animal fat?The article was quick to point out how difficult it is to adjust to living in a "meat eating" society.They did leave out one reason for a person to become a "vegitarian". That is the control issue. It, unfortunately, is used by a too large number of people (e.g. some anorexics) to attempt to rest back some control in their lives from others. I've seen this as my own daughter grew up. Being a picky eater and pseudo-vegitarian ( I say pseudo since she never did really look into what it takes to eat well with vegitable-only products. She never did load her plate sufficiently with enough vegitable products to get the required protein), she did indeed use the food tool as a controlling medium.I'm not trying to "put down" vegitarians. They are entitled to eat as they choose. I am trying to say that declaring any food type as "bad" is just not justified. Bad for you -- maybe. Bad for the rest of us--probably not.
 

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I have often wondered is meat gets a bad name for two reasons:1) gall bladder problems2) emotional problems and/or ethical choices that make one sick upon just seeing meat.( I get sick looking at those consuming squid and bug larva. I'll freely admit that it is an emotional problem and not at all based upon logic. However, I still feel sick about it)I'm not saying that here are not other potential problems with meat, but it seems like a declaring meat as "evil" is a bit of a stretch. Some people also get sick on soy products. Does that mean soy is physically or ethically bad? How about peanuts? I was reading a Washington Post article on vegitarians and vegans. Vegans are those who will not eat meat or products which are obtained from animals in an "inhumane" way. That exclusion includes dairy products and eggs.I couldn't help wondering out loud if the vegans use hair shampoo and conditioners which are loaded with animal fats or candles which often come from rendered animal fat?The article was quick to point out how difficult it is to adjust to living in a "meat eating" society.They did leave out one reason for a person to become a "vegitarian". That is the control issue. It, unfortunately, is used by a too large number of people (e.g. some anorexics) to attempt to rest back some control in their lives from others. I've seen this as my own daughter grew up. Being a picky eater and pseudo-vegitarian ( I say pseudo since she never did really look into what it takes to eat well with vegitable-only products. She never did load her plate sufficiently with enough vegitable products to get the required protein), she did indeed use the food tool as a controlling medium.I'm not trying to "put down" vegitarians. They are entitled to eat as they choose. I am trying to say that declaring any food type as "bad" is just not justified. Bad for you -- maybe. Bad for the rest of us--probably not.
 

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Their is one cut of steak that sends me running to the bathroom usually within 30 minutes of eating it. That's chuck steak. I guess it is a very fatty cut. I have omitted that from my diet. I can eat hamburgers and other cuts of steak without running for the bathroom though.
 

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Their is one cut of steak that sends me running to the bathroom usually within 30 minutes of eating it. That's chuck steak. I guess it is a very fatty cut. I have omitted that from my diet. I can eat hamburgers and other cuts of steak without running for the bathroom though.
 

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Not to discourage you, but I found that as I removed known triggers from my diet, I developed new ones. It was sort of like my body *wanted* me to have diarrhea, and since I wasn't giving it the usual trigger foods anymore, it started reacting to foods that I used to be able to eat with no problem.
 

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Not to discourage you, but I found that as I removed known triggers from my diet, I developed new ones. It was sort of like my body *wanted* me to have diarrhea, and since I wasn't giving it the usual trigger foods anymore, it started reacting to foods that I used to be able to eat with no problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all the responses! It's nice to know that there are people out there who understand what you're talking about.Just to clarify--I am not a vegan or vegetarian. I enjoy some meat, but meat seems to annoy my intestines! Honestly, hamburgers are the worst. If I have one, I dearly pay for it later. I am just looking for some alternatives to get on an even keel. I can take 2-3 episodes a day, but not 8-12! Thanks again. Stephanie
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for all the responses! It's nice to know that there are people out there who understand what you're talking about.Just to clarify--I am not a vegan or vegetarian. I enjoy some meat, but meat seems to annoy my intestines! Honestly, hamburgers are the worst. If I have one, I dearly pay for it later. I am just looking for some alternatives to get on an even keel. I can take 2-3 episodes a day, but not 8-12! Thanks again. Stephanie
 

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angry--no one said meat was evil. Unless i missed somethng, you're the first person to bring that up.And every vegan I know is very careful to buy personal care products that are not made with any animal ingredients. Those products are readily available at any healthfood store.As for Tempifern's question...I do suspect that the fat may be a problem. Looking at what the meat is cooked in, or what you often eat it with, could also be helpful.Sometimes it is so hard to figure out what is triggering attacks, and you don't want to eliminate a food if it isn't actually the trigger.That said, I have been a vegetarian for 12 years, and if you do decide to try going without meat for a little while, you can ask me and the dozen or so other vegetarians on the board for help maintaining a healthy, meat-free diet.
 

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angry--no one said meat was evil. Unless i missed somethng, you're the first person to bring that up.And every vegan I know is very careful to buy personal care products that are not made with any animal ingredients. Those products are readily available at any healthfood store.As for Tempifern's question...I do suspect that the fat may be a problem. Looking at what the meat is cooked in, or what you often eat it with, could also be helpful.Sometimes it is so hard to figure out what is triggering attacks, and you don't want to eliminate a food if it isn't actually the trigger.That said, I have been a vegetarian for 12 years, and if you do decide to try going without meat for a little while, you can ask me and the dozen or so other vegetarians on the board for help maintaining a healthy, meat-free diet.
 

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I too cut out meat from my diet for a two year span when my IBS-D was at full tilt. To be honest, I cut out most all foods and I am ashamed to say that person can live on licorice, mochas & cigarettes for at least three months...Not that I am advocating such a diet - but I did find there was a time that it didn't matter what I ate, I would be running to the bathroom, sometimes with in just a few bites. Sometimes that still happens today.I now eat a variety of foods and yes, I still run to the bathroom at times. There are also times that I choose not to eat because I don't want to have an "episode".There are many IBSers that are trying to "find the way" that with make them symptom free. The one thing/diet/supplement/program that will "cure them". I am no longer part of that group. Instead, I choose to spend my time and energy trying to find enjoyment in each day, even if I am having a bad IBS day.For me it's all in my state of mind, and that is the one thing I can change for the better, whatever my body decides to do. Not always easy but after 25 years of this, definately necessary for me. Many people need to search for the answer. I am just broaching the idea that perhaps giving up the search can bring piece of mind (but not, perhaps, body) to some of us that are suffering.loon
 

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I too cut out meat from my diet for a two year span when my IBS-D was at full tilt. To be honest, I cut out most all foods and I am ashamed to say that person can live on licorice, mochas & cigarettes for at least three months...Not that I am advocating such a diet - but I did find there was a time that it didn't matter what I ate, I would be running to the bathroom, sometimes with in just a few bites. Sometimes that still happens today.I now eat a variety of foods and yes, I still run to the bathroom at times. There are also times that I choose not to eat because I don't want to have an "episode".There are many IBSers that are trying to "find the way" that with make them symptom free. The one thing/diet/supplement/program that will "cure them". I am no longer part of that group. Instead, I choose to spend my time and energy trying to find enjoyment in each day, even if I am having a bad IBS day.For me it's all in my state of mind, and that is the one thing I can change for the better, whatever my body decides to do. Not always easy but after 25 years of this, definately necessary for me. Many people need to search for the answer. I am just broaching the idea that perhaps giving up the search can bring piece of mind (but not, perhaps, body) to some of us that are suffering.loon
 

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Hello!Meat has always been a problem with me. I have to stick with very, very, very lean meat. Skinless chicken is also a must. I eat 95% or more lean hamburger. The only meat that has me confused is porkchops. They are kind of high in fat but do not bother me at all.
Tricia
 
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