Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Health Support Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
FYI:Depression May Be a Risk Factor forRelapse in Patients With IBD By Kirell Lakhman SAN DIEGO, May 23 (Reuters Health) - Patients withinflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who experience depressionor anxiety are at an increased risk of relapsing, a team ofresearchers from Austria reports. Consequently, physicians who treat these patients, especiallythose with Crohn's disease, should include psychosocial andbehavioral therapy in their clinical management, the researchteam says. "We have found that it is not only the actual psychological stateof patients with IBD that contributes to relapse, but also theway in which these patients respond to problems," Dr.Gabriele Moser, of the University of Vienna, told ReutersHealth. "Ultimately, the way a patient with this disease handleshis moods will influence the way his disease progresses." For 18 months, Dr. Moser's group prospectively studied 43consecutive patients with Crohn's disease and 8 consecutivepatients with ulcerative colitis. All patients were in clinicalremission at the onset of the trial. The researchers evaluated the patients for disease activity andpsychosocial status at baseline and at 3-month intervalsthroughout the 18-month study. The investigators used theCrohn's disease activity index and a clinical activity index tomeasure disease activity, and an IBD-specific quality-of lifequestionnaire (IBDQ), the Beck Depression Inventory and theSpielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory to gauge mental state.Presenting her group's findings here at the annual DigestiveDisease Week meetings, Dr. Moser explained that the cohortexperienced a mean of 1.65 relapses per person during thestudy period, and the total number of relapses "correlated withdepressive mood, state and trait anxiety, IBDQ and with thesum of relapses within 1 year before inclusion." The team also noticed that patients with Crohn's disease "havemore problems [coping and maintaining their remission] duringactive phases of the disease than patients with ulcerative colitis� their mood is more likely to affect their clinical course," Dr.Moser told Reuters Health. "Before this study, there was very little knowledge aboutpsychosomatic influences in IBD," she said. "But now we cansay that it may be useful for patients with IBD to receiveintegrated care in which the psychological [service] workswith the gastroenterologists." ------------------ http://webpotential.com/ericibs/index.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
There are three state of the art articles in medscape gastroenterlogy page on IBD, that anyone who has these conditons should really look at.
------------------ http://webpotential.com/ericibs/index.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,922 Posts
Very interesting article, Eric. Thanks for posting it.
I take antidepressants, and I know that my health is affected a lot by my moods. It's very difficult to explain, but if I am really depressed, I don't care about anything and actually do tell myself I don't care if I get sick. And then I do. So, for myself there is a direct connection. (I'm not saying this is for everyone!)I'll have to check those other articles out, even though I don't have IBD.Thanks again, Eric.
JeanG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Actually the same applies for IBS.Behavioral therapy improves management of irritable bowel syndromeWESTPORT, May 01 (Reuters Health) - Patients with (IBS) benefit from multi-componentbehavioral therapy in addition to standard medical treatment, researchers in Germany report.Dr. Ingeborg Heymann-Monnikes, of Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany, and colleaguescompared the benefits of multi-component behavioral therapy and standard medical treatmentwith standard medical treatment alone. Twenty-four outpatients with IBS were randomlyselected to receive standardized multi-component behavioral therapy plus standard medicaltreatment or standard medical treatment alone.According to the researchers, "standardized multi-component behavioral therapy included IBSinformation and education, progressive muscle relaxation, training in illness-related cognitivecoping strategies, problem-solving and assertiveness training in 10 sessions over 10 weeks."Evaluations of the patients were conducted over 14 weeks with follow-up evaluations at 3months and for the multi-component behavioral therapy group again at 6 months, according to thereport in the April issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology.Subjects kept a daily IBS diary in which they were asked to note "intensity, frequency, duration,unendurability and impact on daily life activities of each of 20 IBS-related symptoms." Theresearchers also gave the participants a battery of six psychological tests.The investigators found that there was a significant reduction in IBS symptoms "as measured bydaily symptom diaries" for the standardized multi-component behavioral therapy groupcompared with the standard medical treatment group. In addition, "overall well-beingsignificantly improved in the standardized multi-component behavioral therapy group butremained unchanged in the standard medical treatment group."Also, patients in the standardized multi-component behavioral therapy group "felt significantlymore in control of their health." Reported quality of life also significantly improved for thisgroup while remaining unchanged for the standard medical treatment group.Am J Gastroenterol 2000;95:981-994.-Westport Newsroom 203 319 2700------------------ http://webpotential.com/ericibs/index.htm
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top