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I wondered if anyone has any experience with IBS C & D with children?My son has had problems pooping his pants his entire life (between potty training age and now).We had been treating the problem as a Eurology problem all along, but the light is going on that because I was diagnosed IBS D in November that maybe his too is a bowel problem (IBS C & D). His diet sucks�won�t eat much fruit or veggies (or anything much with fiber). He�s very picky and turns up his nose at lots of things most kids like. But he has pretty bad c and d problems (minus the pain, perhaps). He says he can�t make it to the toilet fast enough sometimes and seems to always (every day) have poop in his underwear. His Eurology Dr. says it�s called Encopresis, where kids hold their BMs for too long, causing their colon to expand because it is overloaded and blocking the normal flow of a BMs. When the colon is blocked, BMs must seep past/around the blockage and that causes some of the soiling in his underwear. We try to insist that he goes twice a day, but he cries because it�s too hard or says he can�t go. And then every few days he just explodes all over his pants (sometimes the toilet). We give him stool softeners and citracel drink (for the fiber). He does good for a while, but inevitably gets backed up. Any ideas or experience on treating children with IBS would be very much appreciated. Perhaps we need to take him to a Gastro/Colon/Rectal person like I had to go to.
 

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FYIgi disorders in kids http://www.aboutkidsgi.org/ Defecation Anxiety Linked to Functional Constipation in Chil-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- FYIDefecation Anxiety Linked to Functional Constipation in ChildrenCharlene LainoOct. 15, 2003 (Baltimore) � Children with functional constipation have significantly more anxiety related to toileting behavior than healthy children � anxiety. This anxiety makes them more likely to continue to suffer from the problem, a prospective study suggests.Moreover, some of these children develop generalized anxiety, reported researchers from the Cleveland Clinic Foundation."Constipated kids were not generally anxious overall, but among those with defecation anxiety we saw an increase in general anxiety," said Gerard Banez, PhD, a child psychologist at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. "This does not prove cause-and-effect, but does suggest that those constipated children with greater defecation anxiety also exhibit increased general anxiety."Painful bowel movements can make a child fearful of pain, Dr. Banez said. That fear can be generalized to sitting on the toilet.The research was described here today at the American College of Gastroenterology 68th annual scientific meeting.Up to 7.5% of children suffer from constipation, which accounts for about 3% of visits to pediatricians and up to 25% of visits to pediatric gastroenterologists, according to data cited in the study.According to the researchers, constipation carries a host of physical and psychological consequences, and defecation anxiety is often implicated as a primary contributor to constipation. Dr. Banez and colleagues studied 98 boys and girls aged 6 to 18 years who suffered from functional constipation. The youngsters completed the Defecation Anxiety Scale�Self-Report and Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale, which measures generalized anxiety. The parents also rated their children's defecation anxiety on the Defecation Anxiety Scale�Parent Rating Scales.By both self-report and parent report, children with functional constipation were found to have significantly more defecation anxiety than healthy children or children with asthma, the researchers said. Overall, 70% of the children reported defecation anxiety compared with 58% of a control group of healthy children and 65% of children with asthma. The parents reported that 82% of their children suffered from defecation anxiety.In addition, 30% of the children with constipation reported generalized anxiety. The greater the defecation anxiety, the greater the generalized anxiety, Dr. Banez said. Children with defecation anxiety have a higher chance of having generalized anxiety, although some children with no significant generalized anxiety still had defecation anxiety, he added.Physicians who see children with constipation anxiety should rule out any medical cause, Dr. Banez said. Also, consider defecation anxiety in the differential diagnosis of any child whose parents report that their child seems to be withholding stool, is tearful at the urge to use the toilet, or shows vigorous resistance to using the toilet, he said.Also, physicians should discuss strategies that promote relaxed toilet sitting as well as suggest dietary changes � possibly with a stool softener thrown in � to promote softer stools, Dr. Banez said. William Whitehead, MD, professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, said he has had some luck treating constipation anxiety with biofeedback, although he said that studies in Europe suggest that laxatives work just as well as the relaxation technique.The question now, he said, is whether anxiety is the cause or the consequence of constipation. ?This study doesn?t really tell us, but it is still a major advance, the first trial I know of where they have linked defecation and anxiety directly using such a systematic approach.?ACG 68th Annual Scientific Meeting: Abstract 723. Presented Oct. 15, 2003.Reviewed by Gary D. Vogin, MDRecurrent abdominal pain in children: forerunner to adult ir-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- FYIJ Spec Pediatr Nurs. 2003 Jul-Sep;8(3):81-9. Related Articles, Links Recurrent abdominal pain in children: forerunner to adult irritable bowel syndrome?Jarrett M, Heitkemper M, Czyzewski DI, Shulman R.Department of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. jarrett###u.washington.eduISSUES AND PURPOSE: Review the etiology and pathophysiology of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and its potential role as a precursor to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults. CONCLUSIONS: Physiological mechanisms not easily identifiable as an organic cause may underlie symptoms in RAP patients. They may be triggered by psychosocial factors that result in greater functional disability, more clinic visits, and lower academic and social competence. Of these children, 25% will experience similar symptoms as adults; many will be diagnosed with IBS. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Nurses can provide early and efficient management of these children's care if they view the issues of abdominal pain/discomfort from a broader focus that includes the context of the child's experiences.PMID: 12942886Kids Take Sickness Cue From Parents (IBS) http://preventdisease.com/news/articles/ki...s_parents.shtml webmdKids Have Fewer Days of Abdominal Pain When Using Relaxation-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- FYIMind-Body Technique Eases Kids' Gut PainKids Have Fewer Days of Abdominal Pain When Using Relaxation Technique http://my.webmd.com/content/article/72/815...C-9531713CA348}
 

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Have you talked to his school? Does he have access whenever he needs to have in a private toilet near to his class? The school should ensure that he is taught near to a toilet even if this means moving classroom year groups around. That is what happens in the uk under the guidance of inclusion. Hope it settles down soon for him.xx
 

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I have a 14 yar old son and a 10 year old daughter, and they both tend toward c with ab pain. My son has a really bad diet, mostly pizza, pasta and mac and cheese. My daughter is somewhat better with food but not much. I'm sure they inherited ibs from me. Mine acts up whenever so I'm not sure diet is always a factor. Anyway, yes this can be a problem for kids, it's bad enough for us grownups, but it really effects our kids. I think we need to discuss with them coping strategies and how to survive when they are out. It also helps to ask teachers to work with these kids in a caring and discreet manner. take care.
 
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