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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am having a terrible day again today. I 've had such bad D lately that I had some percocette to take away the pain. That ran out so I am in pain today. Just feel really stupid. My kids are home from school. I can't get the house looking decent , I want to go out to the neighbors to watch my kids swim but I feel dumb cause i can't get done what I should around the house. I always feel like a loser anymore, can never get caught up with anything or be on top of my life at all. This D rules my life and my life is not my own.
 

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TwoCups I Have IBS-C, but the pain, niot the C, rules my life at the moment, so I know whre you are coming from. It makes me so depressed that even when I want to do something, I am lacking the motivation to do it. If I'm not in pain, I suffer from the anxiety of knowing it is just around the corner. I just hold on to the fact that it cannot always be this way, as I did not always have IBS, so maybe I can return to that state in the future...I hope you feel free to continue to post about how you're feeling, it is very hard to keep one's spirit's up when physical illness and pain constantly interfere. Let us know how you are doing, and try not to lose hope. A lot of people eventually see better days, whenther through dietary changes, hypnotherapy, herbal and medical treatments, or a combination of any of the above.Take Care!
 

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Sorry to hear you're having such trouble. Have you tried a bile acid sequestrant? My husband had uncontrolable diarrhea, went several times a day, would come on "all of the sudden". It has all gone completely away by adding Questran. It's a powdered drink that he drinks once a day. It's a prescription medicine often used to control diarrhea. Check into it. It has been lifechanging for my husband. He goes anywhere and eats anything now. Good luck.
 

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Wow - we could be the same person. I FEEL (literally)your pain. I've had IBS D every day since I'm 14. I too have to take percs around 7-10 times a month for that darn painful D. I suffer every day with this D. Then when its really bad (like the last 2 weeks - just can't seem to get control of it) I'm cramping all morning until I can't take it anymore then have to take the percs. I usually take Pamine every day anyway(anti spasm). Then FINALLY around 2-3pm ,it eases up. But now I look at the house- YUK. Like I feel like cleaning it, or doing wash after being in pain all day! I feel so tired most of the time and depression kicks in too. I'm supposed to get another colonoscopy this summer. Hate the whole prep thing. But its got to get done.All I have to say is I'm with ya Twocups
and there's many of us that are with ya! I've kind of just accepted that my house can't be clean - I try to save my energy for my kids 4 & 6 year old boys. Screw the house. A lot of the time they are fishing for clean Power Ranger and Batman undies out of the green basket and tossing the dirty ones in the blue basket. I'm always so behind on wash. I certainly can't fold laundry from the "hopper" (toilet)
The best chore I do from the hopper is talk to the telemarketers. The 4 year old brings me the phone. I have to laugh. So that's my take on it - I can only do so much , and I try to save my best for the kids- I manage to get out and play with them in the afternoons. Dinner somehow gets on the table and a path is cleared for the husband to get in the door. Its always an uphill battle- but my boys come first. Hang in there, we're gonna beat this one day!!!!
Good Luck and you have a better day!Lisak64 aka Hopper
 
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I don't know if this will help you or not, but I just recently discovered that taking the combination calcium/magnesium (low dose) has tempered my IBS... the strong fluctuations I used to get between diarrhea and constipation have eased significantly. Have you ever tried that?
 

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I know how you feel, most days I feel this way.The past 4 years has been hard due to my IBS. But really my life has NOT been my own since this past October. Seems like everything came crashing down on me, and it never lets up. My gallbladder surgery was in October and that has been a long road getting back to "normal" with that. I found out I have cyst problems on my ovaries a few months ago. Then that wierd throat closing sensation started two months ago. Anxiety galore. Even small stressers in my life seem to much. I got sick this week, a cold. Of course I just can't get a "regular" cold, noooooooo I get bronchitis. And we leave for our vacation in 8 days! Which is stress all in itself. Sometimes I just wish I could take a vacation from my body. That would be nice, just get away from my health. Even for one week. That would be heaven!! Sorry to also vent in your thread! Just know your not alone!!Hope you feel better!
 

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Hi Twocups and welcome to the Board:I'm sorry to hear you have so much pain that you need painpills. It must be really bad.I don't remember if you posted before, because I'm not always on the BB, and when I am I hop around from one forum to another. So if I ask something you've talked about before, don't mind me.
Have you been seen by a doctor who diagnosed IBS? If you haven't, it's a good thing to go and get things checked out. There are other things that mimic IBS.Some people have found that antidepressants, given at a much lower dosage than for depression, help with the pain, so you might want to check that out. Hypnotherapy is also an excellent way to manage IBS symptoms. If you check out the rest of the BB you'll find there are a lot of different things that you can try.In the meantime, here is an article from the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse on IBS that you may be interested in. It's located at: http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health/digest/pub...el/irrbowel.htm What Is Irritable Bowel Syndrome? What Causes IBS? What Are the Symptoms of IBS? How Is IBS Diagnosed? How Do Diet and Stress Affect IBS? How Does a Good Diet Help IBS? Can Medicines Relieve IBS Symptoms? Is IBS Linked to Other Diseases? Additional Readings -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- What Is Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder of the intestines that leads to crampy pain, gassiness, bloating, and changes in bowel habits. Some people with IBS have constipation (difficult or infrequent bowel movements); others have diarrhea (frequent loose stools, often with an urgent need to move the bowels); and some people experience both. Sometimes the person with IBS has a crampy urge to move the bowels but cannot do so. Through the years, IBS has been called by many names--colitis, mucous colitis, spastic colon, spastic bowel, and functional bowel disease. Most of these terms are inaccurate. Colitis, for instance, means inflammation of the large intestine (colon). IBS, however, does not cause inflammation and should not be confused with another disorder, ulcerative colitis. The cause of IBS is not known, and as yet there is no cure. Doctors call it a functional disorder because there is no sign of disease when the colon is examined. IBS causes a great deal of discomfort and distress, but it does not cause permanent harm to the intestines and does not lead to intestinal bleeding of the bowel or to a serious disease such as cancer. Often IBS is just a mild annoyance, but for some people it can be disabling. They may be unable to go to social events, to go out to a job, or to travel even short distances. Most people with IBS, however, are able to control their symptoms through medications prescribed by their physicians, diet, and stress management. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- What Causes IBS? The colon, which is about 6 feet long, connects the small intestine with the rectum and anus. The major function of the colon is to absorb water and salts from digestive products that enter from the small intestine. Two quarts of liquid matter enter the colon from the small intestine each day. This material may remain there for several days until most of the fluid and salts are absorbed into the body. The stool then passes through the colon by a pattern of movements to the left side of the colon, where it is stored until a bowel movement occurs. Colon motility (contraction of intestinal muscles and movement of its contents) is controlled by nerves and hormones and by electrical activity in the colon muscle. The electrical activity serves as a "pacemaker" similar to the mechanism that controls heart function. Movements of the colon propel the contents slowly back and forth but mainly toward the rectum. A few times each day strong muscle contractions move down the colon pushing fecal material ahead of them. Some of these strong contractions result in a bowel movement. Because doctors have been unable to find an organic cause, IBS often has been thought to be caused by emotional conflict or stress. While stress may worsen IBS symptoms, research suggests that other factors also are important. Researchers have found that the colon muscle of a person with IBS begins to spasm after only mild stimulation. The person with IBS seems to have a colon that is more sensitive and reactive than usual, so it responds strongly to stimuli that would not bother most people. Ordinary events such as eating and distention from gas or other material in the colon can cause the colon to overreact in the person with IBS. Certain medicines and foods may trigger spasms in some people. Sometimes the spasm delays the passage of stool, leading to constipation. Chocolate, milk products, or large amounts of alcohol are frequent offenders. Caffeine causes loose stools in many people, but it is more likely to affect those with IBS. Researchers also have found that women with IBS may have more symptoms during their menstrual periods, suggesting that reproductive hormones can increase IBS symptoms. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- What Are the Symptoms of IBS? If you are concerned about IBS, it is important to realize that normal bowel function varies from person to person. Normal bowel movements range from as many as three stools a day to as few as three a week. A normal movement is one that is formed but not hard, contains no blood, and is passed without cramps or pain. People with IBS, on the other hand, usually have crampy abdominal pain with painful constipation or diarrhea. In some people, constipation and diarrhea alternate. Sometimes people with IBS pass mucus with their bowel movements. Bleeding, fever, weight loss, and persistent severe pain are not symptoms of IBS but may indicate other problems. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- How Is IBS Diagnosed? IBS usually is diagnosed after doctors exclude the presence of disease. To get to that point, the doctor will take a complete medical history that includes a careful description of symptoms. A physical examination and laboratory tests will be done. A stool sample will be tested for evidence of bleeding. The doctor also may do diagnostic procedures such as x-rays or endoscopy (viewing the colon through a flexible tube inserted through the anus) to find out if there is disease. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- How Do Diet and Stress Affect IBS? The potential for abnormal function of the colon is always present in people with IBS, but a trigger also must be present to cause symptoms. The most likely culprits seem to be diet and emotional stress. Many people report that their symptoms occur following a meal or when they are under stress. No one is sure why this happens, but scientists have some clues. Eating causes contractions of the colon. Normally, this response may cause an urge to have a bowel movement within 30 to 60 minutes after a meal. In people with IBS, the urge may come sooner with cramps and diarrhea. The strength of the response is often related to the number of calories in a meal and especially the amount of fat in a meal. Fat in any form (animal or vegetable) is a strong stimulus of colonic contractions after a meal. Many foods contain fat, especially meats of all kinds, poultry skin, whole milk, cream, cheese, butter, vegetable oil, margarine, shortening, avocados, and whipped toppings. Stress also stimulates colonic spasm in people with IBS. This process is not completely understood, but scientists point out that the colon is controlled partly by the nervous system. Stress reduction (relaxation) training or counseling and support help relieve IBS symptoms in some people. However, doctors are quick to note that this does not mean IBS is the result of a personality disorder. IBS is at least partly a disorder of colon motility. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- How Does a Good Diet Help IBS? For many people, eating a proper diet lessens IBS symptoms. Before changing your diet, it is a good idea to keep a journal noting which foods seem to cause distress. Discuss your findings with your doctor. You also may want to consult a registered dietitian, who can help you make changes in your diet. For instance, if dairy products cause your symptoms to flare up, you can try eating less of those foods. Yogurt might be tolerated better because it contains organisms that supply lactase, the enzyme needed to digest lactose, the sugar found in milk products. Because dairy products are an important source of calcium and other nutrients that your body needs, be sure to get adequate nutrients in the foods that you substitute. Dietary fiber may lessen IBS symptoms in many cases. Whole grain breads and cereals, beans, fruits, and vegetables are good sources of fiber. Consult your doctor before using an over-the-counter fiber supplement. High-fiber diets keep the colon mildly distended, which may help to prevent spasms from developing. Some forms of fiber also keep water in the stools, thereby preventing hard stools that are difficult to pass. Doctors usually recommend that you eat just enough fiber so that you have soft, easily passed, and painless bowel movements. High-fiber diets may cause gas and bloating, but within a few weeks, these symptoms often go away as your body adjusts to the diet.Large meals can cause cramping and diarrhea in people with IBS. Symptoms may be eased if you eat smaller meals more often or just eat smaller portions. This should help, especially if your meals are low in fat and high in carbohydrates such as pasta, rice, whole-grain breads and cereals, fruits, and vegetables.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Can Medicines Relieve IBS Symptoms? Your doctor may prescribe fiber supplements or occasional laxatives if you are constipated. Some doctors prescribe drugs that control colon muscle spasms, drugs that slow the movement of food through the digestive system, tranquilizers, or antidepressant drugs, all of which may relieve symptoms. It is important to follow the physician's instructions when taking IBS medications--particularly laxatives, which can be habit forming if not used carefully.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Is IBS Linked to Other Diseases? IBS has not been shown to lead to any serious, organic diseases. No link has been established between IBS and inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. IBS does not lead to cancer. Some patients have a more severe form of IBS, and the pain and diarrhea may cause them to withdraw from normal activities. These patients need to work with their physicians to find the best combination of medicine, diet, counseling, and support to control their symptoms.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Additional Readings Scanlon, D, Becnel, B. Wellness Book of IBS. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1989. Practical patient's guide to coping with IBS written by a registered dietitian. Available in libraries and bookstores.Shimberg, E. Relief From IBS. New York: M. Evans and Company, 1988. Practical book for patients offers information about IBS symptoms, diet, treatment, and self-care. Available in libraries and bookstores.Steinhart, MJ. Irritable bowel syndrome: How to relieve symptoms enough to improve daily function. Postgraduate Medicine 1992; 91(6): 315-321. Article for primary care physicians includes information about relief of IBS symptoms. Available in medical and university libraries.Thompson, WG. Gut reactions: Understanding symptoms of the digestive tract. New York: Plenum Publishing Corp., 1989. Clear, concise book by a digestive diseases specialist gives advice about diagnosis, diet, and treatment of IBS. Available in libraries and bookstores. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse2 Information WayBethesda, MD 20892-3570Email: ndic###info.niddk.nih.gov The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health under the U.S. Public Health Service. Established in 1980, the clearinghouse provides information about digestive diseases to people with digestive disorders and to their families, health care professionals, and the public. NDDIC answers inquiries; develops, reviews, and distributes publications; and works closely with professional and patient organizations and Government agencies to coordinate resources about digestive diseases.Publications produced by the clearinghouse are reviewed carefully for scientific accuracy, content, and readability. This e-text is not copyrighted. The clearinghouse encourages users of this e-pub to duplicate and distribute as many copies as desired.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- NIH Publication No. 97-693October 1992e-text posted: February 1998e-text last updated: November 2000
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Jean G.Oh yes, I had all the tests etc. Both ends!!!!!! I definately have IBS the doctor said ( I actually I think I have IBD or colitis) . I have had antispasmotic's,depression meds,pain pills, muscle relaxers, fiber, no fiber, bland diet, calsium didn't help, some herbs helped alittle like aloe vera capsules, or slippery elm.I don't know what else to do. Cry. I do that alot. I think I could do with a great sympathetic counseler that i could unload on. Never really tried that. Sometimes I wish I had a ice cube supossitory. It hurts that bad. Whatever. Thanks for listening
 

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Welcome but sorry to hear you feel so bad..Just hang around here for a while and you will see what works best for you..I have had IBS and CVS since 1961 and it wasnt untill last year that I was finally able to get relief...IBS-D is a pain in the a*s for sure...Glad you are here
 
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