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I just went to my PCP today about the symptoms I am having, he is trying looking into whether is an ulcer and/or IBS. I didn't know much about IBS but when I came home and read everything I am 100% certain this is what I have. How much does it impact your life? Honestly I am really sad right now, I deal with chronic migraines and don't want to deal with chronic intestinal issues. It seems diet plays a big part in it and I don't eat very well. I know I will need to make some changes but feel really overwhelmed right now. I know it could be worse but this just sucks!
 

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You’re right – it can suck very much. IBS is not life-threatening, but it can impact a life very much. People who never thought twice about their GI tract in the past are suddenly struck with needing to know which foods they can eat, where the bathrooms are and when and when not to go out. It can be incredibly frustrating – something I’m sure you’re familiar with given your chronic migraines (by the way, I have a history of migraines as well and they are no fun).Is your doctor running further tests on you? Testing to rule out conditions with symptoms similar to IBS will be based on your symptoms, age, and other risk factors. I assume that you’re getting an upper endoscopy if your doctor suspects an ulcer, but I could be mistaken. Ruling out other diagnoses can be a lengthy process for some. As can finding the correct treatment. As for the diet, that is going to vary from person to person and your past experiences. Some people here are lactose or gluten intolerant. If you feel that these are potential triggers for you, you may wish to bring it up with your doctor. Do not give up gluten on your own if your doctor is planning an upper endoscopy – It can alter the results and make it look like you don’t have celiac disease even if you do. A well balanced diet is important, but finding what works for you is going to be key. For instance, I know that if I want to eat scrambled eggs, I better be home for the remainder of the day just in case. Over time you’ll see what does and doesn’t work for you. But keep in mind that it’s possible for these “triggers” to change.You absolutely have the right to be feeling overwhelmed and sad. Keeping your friends and family aware of your situation is important – The understanding that when you say “I have to get home or I have to use the bathroom” can make you feel so much more relaxed in a given situation. I held off telling people for awhile and I wish I hadn’t.About five years ago, I came onto this board and said a lot of stuff similar to what you just said. If someone had told me what I’m about to say to you, I don’t know that I would have believed them, so don’t feel bad if you don’t either. But it is possible that things will get better. Five years ago I was in extreme pain, was afraid to go out most of the time and could not imagine a time where that wouldn’t be the case. Now I have minimal symptoms, am off all IBS medications and have done a lot of things I couldn’t have imagined doing right after I was diagnosed. Keep coming here and asking questions – Even if you don’t get your answer, the support you get is amazing.
 
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