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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am noticing some changes since I started a gluten free diet 10 days ago. I have controlled lower gas somewhat with vsl#3 and a low fructose diet, but now that I have cut out gluten my gas production is down to almost nonexistent. The anal itching I have had has disappeared. I know it is way too early to tell but I am encouraged. The burping and reflux remain which makes me believe that it is a separate problem from the lower gas. The doc at enterolab is very helpful and does not charge for his time. He claims it is his gift to humanity. I do recommend people get tested for gluten intolerance at enterolab. I emailed Dr. Lynn Chang at UCLA my results and basically she said enterolab is controversial but she sure did not dismiss it. www.enterolab.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bonnie,Are you planning on cutting out wheat forever? I'm not sure about the gene testing. Dr. Fine claims that 40% of people have the gene whereas only .5% of people have celiac. I'm going to stick gluten free for a couple of months and keep a diary. Then I'll decide what to do. The diet isn't that bad
 

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No when my body craves carbs I have wheat and fructose. But I know now what I have to do to be gas free. That is progress.
As to whether I am worried about celiac I don't know what to say. It is at the back of my mind.
 

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Can you guys still eat spelt and quinoise flours or is everything off the table?
 

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One week of careful eating is a faster, cheaper, and more accurate method of determining if wheat/gluten is causing your gut problems. (glad to hear you are doing better) You could have other problems that show up on a test panel, but these batteries of tests don't test for everything. If I was 90% better, I would stick with the diet for a while, and consider other tests later.Have you tried DGL licorice for the reflux? It works pretty well for upper GI conditions. It thickens and protects the mucosa layers, and doesn't interfere with normal digestion the way some reflux drugs can.
 

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The % that have the gene vs the % that have the disease makes some sort of sense to this genetics type person.In many cases a gene only determines part of the equations as to who gets what. Many disorders, etc, are a combination of genetic predisposition AND environmental factors. And Celiac seems really likely to be the kind of thing that would be that way.Only if you have the right (or wrong
) genes intersect with the right environment do you get the problem.If you have the gene, but never have the environmental trigger you don't get it.If you do not have the gene, but are constantly exposed to the environmental trigger, you still do not get it.A lot of things with the immune system fall into this sort of issue. Often it is person with certain genes in the immune system gets exposed to something that has a protien that is shaped the right way (so virus X or bacteria Y) and the antibodies made end up cross reacting to something that doesn't normally happen in most people and you get a disease/disorder. Only the people who can make that cross-reacting antibody can get the disease, but you have to get the right triggering factor before you make that antibody (and usually it is still a #### shoot as to whether you make that antibody, or a different one so some people with both the gene and the environmental trigger will still end up free of the problem).K.
 
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