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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking through my local newspaper recently, and saw an ad for a therapist who claimed biofeedback was a viable treatment for IBS sufferers. I made an appointment to see him next Friday, and am very encouraged and excited by my conversation with him. He said he loves working with IBS patients because they respond well to his therapy. I have read that hypnosis was often successful in treating IBS, so it makes some sense that biofeedback could help. Has anyone undergone biofeedback training for IBS? I'd really appreciate hearing from you about the effectiveness of the treatment. I will let you know how things go for me.
 

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biofeedback is an accepted medical treatment for ibs-c but that requires special equipment. as a relaxation kind of thing it's possibly as effective as hypnosis. You could ask in the CBT and hypnosis forum for more information. For my information I'm curious sbout whether this person is licensed and at what level. (I'm possibly going to be giving an inservice on this for professionals.) You can write me bc or PM me if you like.tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll let you know what I find out about his credentials. All I know now is that he is a PhD in some field. He spoke well about IBS, and inspired a confidence in his abilities. Frankly, I'm excited, and Friday can't come soon enough!
 

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You might also want to post in the hypno and CBT forum. If he's doing this clinically I assume he's licensed and a psychologist.tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just wanted to let you know how my visit to the therapist went. First, to answer a previous question about his qualifications: the gentleman has a PhD in psychology, and offers psychotherapy and biofeedback services. Last Friday's visit was an intake session: I filled out forms, answered a variety of questions regarding my situation and stress, listened to a presentation on what the process consists of, and what it aims to do for the patient. He tested my heart variability rate, which he says is an indicator of stress level, among other things.I go back Wed. to learn a breathing technique which is called RSA (for Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia). Essentially, it seeks to develop some degree of control over the parasympathetic nervous system, which controls digestion. It requires equipment to LEARN the technique, but once learned (over the course of a couple of 1 hr. sessions) you can do it at home without any gadgets. I did some Web research, and found that it was originally developed in Russia in an effort to treat asthma patients, and is quite successful.My health insurance is going to cover 75% of the cost, which is modest ($250 for 3-4 sessions). Considering my trip to the ER last Nov. cost over $2,000, this is not an unreasonable amount. I'm excited, as my level of digestive distress has been enough to keep me from working out regularly. I spent 2 years losing 48 lbs., so I have a big investment in my health I want to protect! Updates to follow....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I had my first RSA breathing session today, and it went well. The software providing the feedback is very helpful, and you know immediately whether you are doing it right. I apparently have a natural affinity for it, because I had no trouble creating the desired effect. It's obviously too soon to tell what, if any, effect this will have on my IBS, as I've only done one session on my own this PM. The recommended frequency is 15 minutes, twice per day. I'll let you know (when I know) if it helps my condition. I see the therapist again on the 31st.
 
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