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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone here experience cramping, gas, and lower stomach pain especially while riding in a car or on a plane. I feel like my insides are very sensitive to the small amount of vibration from the road and possibly by the pressurization of an airplane cabin. I am petrified to get in a car or on a plane any more. A plane is the worst because there are times when you're trapped and aren't allowed out of your seat to relieve yourself. I am actually concerned that I am going to have to quit my job because of this embarrasing problem (I have to be on a plane and in a car a lot to get to meetings). Any thoughts on how to control this would be appreciated!
 

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Hi RoadWarrior:I've noticed it mainly on buses on very bad roads. The vibration does seem to make things much worse, I agree. I wondered if anyone else had experienced this.JeanG------------------Member of "The Advance Guard for the Ozone Rangers".May the "farce" be with you. JeanG
 

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Hi RoadWarrior,I actually have more of a problem sitting still for several hours in a meeting. Actually riding in a car is easier on me as you can roll down the windows
AS for airplanes I always try to get an aisle seat.I too have thought about quitting my job because of this. I haven't because it would almost certainly make me feel like I'm the lowest creature on earth..and I'm sure I'd never recover mentally
Don't quit your job please unless you really hate it. I actually talked to my boss about it and found that he also has IBS though a different form. Jane
 

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The best advice I got at a fibromyalgia support group was from a woman who quit her job. She said "Don't ever quit your job." Make them fire you. You can do anything, embarass yourself, embarass others, s---your pants, violate the rule and go to the bathroom when it's not allowed, carry a bed pan and use it in your seat. But if you quit your job, it may be a long time till you get another, the pay cut may be mind and body boggling. So, unless you have a better-for-you job all lined up and for sure, don't quit your job. It's really hard to live on nothing. Hard on the body and hard hard on the soul.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I guess I should have been more clear. I wouldn't actually quit, I'd probably go on a medical leave/disability. I am a sr. vp at a technology company so flat out quiting would cost me a lot more than my bi-weekly paycheck (e.g., stock options). I sincerely appreciate all of the job advice - you all are very kind. Anyone got any for "the problem"??? I really suspect stress has a lot to do with the problem so I probably need to find some good methods for managing it. The weird thing is, I never really made the connection between mind and body and how powerful the brain really is and what it can impact.By the way, if you want to look at the positive side of this problem - you get lots of time to catch up on your reading... ;-)
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
RoadWarrior,Before I retired (got lucky and the company was bought out and options were paid off), I did a lot of plane and car travel.Although it was very troublesome, and toward the end I was getting VERY frustrated with this IBS curse, I did use some management methods that helped.1. Medications - Don't know if imodium works for you, but I used that AND the prescription Lomotil I had, and this helped.2. Diet - I finally realized that it wasn't so much any one type of food as it was the VOLUME consumed and the timing relative to the cramps and other IBS symptoms. Specifically, I adjusted my food intake so that the IBS symptoms were less likely to present themselves at travel time (like eating a small supper the night before, and then no breakfast before flight time in the AM). Now this does put you into a rollercoaster of alternating hunger and rebound episodes when you get back to regular meals, but it works.3. Diapers - I used the kind you can get in any drug store for adult incontinence. The biggest hassle with them was getting them on in a hotel room in the morning, and getting them off in roadside restrooms during the trips. I used the kind with sticky tape on both sides, but I'm sure there are brands out there with elastic all around that are just like briefs. Anyway, I never actually had an episode while wearing them, but they definitely gave me comfort on long plane trips (except for trying to get them down and back up in the plane lavatories). Within the first ten minutes of putting them on, they settle in to your form and pretty soon you almost forget you have them on.One of my last trips before retiring was very bothersome:It was a 4 hour ride I had from LA to Calgary. I made it OK, but wore diapers, took Lomotil and Imodium, and went without eating the whole day. That night after I checked in to the hotel (and finally took the damned diaper off), I couldn't restrain myself from having a large meal that I was sure would haunt me the next day. Problem was, I had to make a three hour drive that next day, into the boonies (with a female associate no less). On went the diapers that morning, and I almost lost it one time when we stopped at a roadside restaurant for breakfast. She ate while I went into the restroom (poorly maintained and filthy, of course) and fumbled with the diaper and the conditions. Somehow, I not only made it through that without too much hassle, but also made the return three hour drive that evening back to Calgary and the hotel without an event. And then the next day I flew back to LA. Even though I managed, it was the trip from hell mostly. Haven't been on a plane since!!!You probably recognize parts or all of that story since I'm sure you've gone through it yourself.The only other thing I can think of is altering your travel schedule, which I did toward the end. To keep myself off the med and diet rollercoaster as much as I could, I grouped my travel as much as possible so that I'd have at least a continuous week to recover. Travel heavy one week, and then off the road the next.Nevertheless, it's a real difficult situation to be in for any length of time. I used to tolerate travel pretty well, and even liked it some times, before IBS. But in that last year I came to hate it!!My "tips" may help you (I hope they do) in the short term, but I think you're going to have to come up with a longer term solution. I was grappling with that very issue when the company got bought out, so I never crossed that bridge - and, sorry to say, never came up with that elusive long term solution.BJ
 

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Road Warrior-I am a senior manager for a technology firm as well. I have many of the same problems as you. I currently am spending a great deal of time outside of the country. 15 hour flights and such. It sucks. I usually spend about two days recovering after the flights. I can't explain it, but, I get a great deal of gas, and bloating when I fly. I now try to order special "bland" meals and avoid alcohol and carbonated beverages on the flights. This helps somewhat. I also don't hold back, I pass gas the whole way, no one can tell on airplanes anyway.As for car rides, my worst time of the day is the 45 minute drive to work every day. Very rairly do I have an event/episode but, as my bowels start to work in the AM it effects me in the car. Traffic Jams about kill me, not because I have problems, but, because I can't get out of traffic if I do have a problem.Last year, I took a 14 hour car ride. I finally decided it wasn't worth it. So, this year, I am flying (at least there is always a bathroom on board). I worried the entire time about having an episode. It almost ruined my vacation. Some things I did that helped included, stopping at a hotel and calling it a day when my stomach/bowels had had enough, listened to books on tape to keep my mind off of my problem, and drank lots of water.Don't feel like you are the only one. I worry a lot about the fact that I can't keep doing my job with these problems. I am afraid that many of my problems occur from the stress of my job. But, as others have told you, don't let IBS beat you. Stick with it. And if worse comes to worse, have a job before you leave this one. (not that I think you will)Good LuckFed Up!
 
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