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Am D type with no real pain just some discomfort had a bad attack on weekend took alot of med to stop D plus increases Caltrate and took lemon Juice (which usually stops my D) think I overdid it - D stopped but last night got very bad pain felt like it was moving through me ie not constant in one place felt like a very bad stitch and came in like waves moved down my left side from under my ribs and was worse just above my pelvis also hurta bit here when I urinated - felt better aftera BM even though it was a very loose BM and in pieces also was a bit C - Is this normal IBS pain?? never had it before pretty sure its from taking too many things to block me?? bit better today and suggestions if it happens again??
 

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I am not sure as this varies so much from person to person. I have periods of unexplainable pain attacks. I can never figure out what triggers them. I use a heating pad, hot baths and narcotic pain relivers. I'm sorry I don't have more explaination, it seem there's a lot we don't know...even doctors.
 

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I am not sure as this varies so much from person to person. I have periods of unexplainable pain attacks. I can never figure out what triggers them. I use a heating pad, hot baths and narcotic pain relivers. I'm sorry I don't have more explaination, it seem there's a lot we don't know...even doctors.
 

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I agree that it can be different for each person. Most of my pain is during a D attack. Like cramping. But then there are times that I get sharp pains that come and go seemingly for no real reason. I also get a lot of gas pains too. And those can be killer! And those seem to last until I pass enough of it! You might be having some pains from being plugged up. Sometimes if I over do it I'll have a day or two of crampy sharp pains, and "getting' it all moving again. It can be so hard when your D type to "find" where the "normal" bowel movement is. Either you over do it, or you under do it!Hope your feeling better!Jennifer
 

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I agree that it can be different for each person. Most of my pain is during a D attack. Like cramping. But then there are times that I get sharp pains that come and go seemingly for no real reason. I also get a lot of gas pains too. And those can be killer! And those seem to last until I pass enough of it! You might be having some pains from being plugged up. Sometimes if I over do it I'll have a day or two of crampy sharp pains, and "getting' it all moving again. It can be so hard when your D type to "find" where the "normal" bowel movement is. Either you over do it, or you under do it!Hope your feeling better!Jennifer
 

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IBS is now considered to be a miscommunication between the gut brain and the brain. It also makes the nerves senstitive that line the digestive tract.In IBS the brain does not release the endorphines (the bodies natural pain killers) like it would in normal healthy people. They have known this for some years now. http://ibs.med.ucla.edu/Newsletters/Fall97Brain.htm You can see some of the pictures they have taken here. http://webpotential.com/uploadpic/ Instead of the pain areas releasing endorphines, a part of the brain that deals with emotions and anxiety is "turned up.""Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) What is it? Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic clinical problem which includes a combination of abdominal pain and altered bowel habits. Patients may also suffer from a range of associated problems such as the feeling of incomplete emptying of the bowel, peculiar shape of their stool, discharge of mucus, the sensation of bloating, excessive gas, and abdominal distension. IBS can manifest itself in different degrees of severity. In its most devastating form, symptoms are longstanding, incapacitating, nearly constant, and have little correlation with food intake or bowel movement. In its milder form, symptoms may have flared only within the last few years and are closely related to food intake or bowel movement. Regardless of its severity, IBS is a chronic, frequently lifelong disease. Who may be affected? IBS is an extremely common problem, affecting as many as 40 million Americans. Sufferers of IBS make up almost half the patients seen by gastroenterologists (bowel specialists). Interestingly, about 8 million more Americans experience similar, less severe symptoms that do not interfere with their lives or prompt them to see a doctor. What causes it? It has long been thought that spasms of the colon or psychiatric factors were the cause of this syndrome. Even though such factors may be associated with IBS in certain patients, they don't seem to play a major role in causing IBS in the first place. In the past few years, scientists have identified a specific abnormality in the sigmoid colon and rectum that can explain most of the symptoms of IBS (such as bloating, gas, fullness, or constipation). This abnormality is an increased sensitivity of sensors within the bowel wall. This internal hypersensitivity is comparable to what occurs when you have a sunburn; the slightest touch or even breeze can be painful while unburned skin will hardly feel the same stimulus. For someone with the hypersensitivity, normal contraction and expansion of the rectum or colon can result in intense sensations. It therefore appears that most of the symptoms of IBS are due to an excessive perception of internal sensations. Frequently, other symptoms of hyper-sensitivity are associated with IBS. A patient may experience headaches, lower back pain, or pain during intercourse. This may be related to the fact that whatever mechanisms cause the hypersensitivity in the colon can also have the same effect on other parts of the body. Why this hypersensitivity develops is not yet understood. There may be genetic factors that make an individual susceptible to this problem. However, once someone is susceptible, factors in that person's environment become the most important triggers and aggravating forces. What affects the problem? Even just drinking water can cause bloating in some patients. For others, specific food items may cause or be related to distension of the stomach. Spices, milk products, artificial sweeteners, acids, and fats all interact with the same nerve receptors in the gut that are affected by IBS. Unresolved emotional problems, interrupted sleep patterns, grieving, depression, and anxiety can also trigger symptoms. So can situations an individual may perceive (consciously or unconsciously) as stressful. Most often, symptoms are triggered by a combination of factors. What can be done? IBS cannot be cured, but it can be controlled in many cases. While scientists try to discover the causes of hypersensitivity and develop more effective medications, the goal of treatment is to reduce the severity of symptoms to a level where they do not interfere with the person's lifestyle. The first step is seeing a physician who can rule out other treatable conditions and establish a firm diagnosis of IBS. Some physical abnormalities can be corrected with surgery, while medications can relieve some diarrhea, constipation, and pain. For most IBS patients, the gastroenterologist will identify specific triggers (dietary, behavioral, or psychological) so that a "custom-tailored" treatment can be planned. Therapies may include medications, relaxation training, short- term psychotherapy, acupuncture, and dietary counseling. Usually a combination of therapies is most effective. In general, a good response to treatment is more likely when symptoms are related to specific dietary or behavioral triggers, when onset or worsening of the problem is relatively recent, and when the patient accepts the special nature of the disease. What can I do? Should problems develop, seek a thorough evaluation and counseling from a physician familiar with the variety of causes and treatments for bowel disorders, such as a gastroenterologist. Keeping a diary of foods eaten or circumstances that worsen the problem can help provide information to your physician. And, since the problem is largely one of hypersensitivity, cooperate with your physician to understand your problem and follow recommendations." http://www.healthcare.ucla.edu/pls/ibs.htm A top world expert talks about IBS. http://www.aboutibs.org/Publications/clinicalIssues.html
 

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IBS is now considered to be a miscommunication between the gut brain and the brain. It also makes the nerves senstitive that line the digestive tract.In IBS the brain does not release the endorphines (the bodies natural pain killers) like it would in normal healthy people. They have known this for some years now. http://ibs.med.ucla.edu/Newsletters/Fall97Brain.htm You can see some of the pictures they have taken here. http://webpotential.com/uploadpic/ Instead of the pain areas releasing endorphines, a part of the brain that deals with emotions and anxiety is "turned up.""Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) What is it? Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic clinical problem which includes a combination of abdominal pain and altered bowel habits. Patients may also suffer from a range of associated problems such as the feeling of incomplete emptying of the bowel, peculiar shape of their stool, discharge of mucus, the sensation of bloating, excessive gas, and abdominal distension. IBS can manifest itself in different degrees of severity. In its most devastating form, symptoms are longstanding, incapacitating, nearly constant, and have little correlation with food intake or bowel movement. In its milder form, symptoms may have flared only within the last few years and are closely related to food intake or bowel movement. Regardless of its severity, IBS is a chronic, frequently lifelong disease. Who may be affected? IBS is an extremely common problem, affecting as many as 40 million Americans. Sufferers of IBS make up almost half the patients seen by gastroenterologists (bowel specialists). Interestingly, about 8 million more Americans experience similar, less severe symptoms that do not interfere with their lives or prompt them to see a doctor. What causes it? It has long been thought that spasms of the colon or psychiatric factors were the cause of this syndrome. Even though such factors may be associated with IBS in certain patients, they don't seem to play a major role in causing IBS in the first place. In the past few years, scientists have identified a specific abnormality in the sigmoid colon and rectum that can explain most of the symptoms of IBS (such as bloating, gas, fullness, or constipation). This abnormality is an increased sensitivity of sensors within the bowel wall. This internal hypersensitivity is comparable to what occurs when you have a sunburn; the slightest touch or even breeze can be painful while unburned skin will hardly feel the same stimulus. For someone with the hypersensitivity, normal contraction and expansion of the rectum or colon can result in intense sensations. It therefore appears that most of the symptoms of IBS are due to an excessive perception of internal sensations. Frequently, other symptoms of hyper-sensitivity are associated with IBS. A patient may experience headaches, lower back pain, or pain during intercourse. This may be related to the fact that whatever mechanisms cause the hypersensitivity in the colon can also have the same effect on other parts of the body. Why this hypersensitivity develops is not yet understood. There may be genetic factors that make an individual susceptible to this problem. However, once someone is susceptible, factors in that person's environment become the most important triggers and aggravating forces. What affects the problem? Even just drinking water can cause bloating in some patients. For others, specific food items may cause or be related to distension of the stomach. Spices, milk products, artificial sweeteners, acids, and fats all interact with the same nerve receptors in the gut that are affected by IBS. Unresolved emotional problems, interrupted sleep patterns, grieving, depression, and anxiety can also trigger symptoms. So can situations an individual may perceive (consciously or unconsciously) as stressful. Most often, symptoms are triggered by a combination of factors. What can be done? IBS cannot be cured, but it can be controlled in many cases. While scientists try to discover the causes of hypersensitivity and develop more effective medications, the goal of treatment is to reduce the severity of symptoms to a level where they do not interfere with the person's lifestyle. The first step is seeing a physician who can rule out other treatable conditions and establish a firm diagnosis of IBS. Some physical abnormalities can be corrected with surgery, while medications can relieve some diarrhea, constipation, and pain. For most IBS patients, the gastroenterologist will identify specific triggers (dietary, behavioral, or psychological) so that a "custom-tailored" treatment can be planned. Therapies may include medications, relaxation training, short- term psychotherapy, acupuncture, and dietary counseling. Usually a combination of therapies is most effective. In general, a good response to treatment is more likely when symptoms are related to specific dietary or behavioral triggers, when onset or worsening of the problem is relatively recent, and when the patient accepts the special nature of the disease. What can I do? Should problems develop, seek a thorough evaluation and counseling from a physician familiar with the variety of causes and treatments for bowel disorders, such as a gastroenterologist. Keeping a diary of foods eaten or circumstances that worsen the problem can help provide information to your physician. And, since the problem is largely one of hypersensitivity, cooperate with your physician to understand your problem and follow recommendations." http://www.healthcare.ucla.edu/pls/ibs.htm A top world expert talks about IBS. http://www.aboutibs.org/Publications/clinicalIssues.html
 

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Your welcome Austin.Do to the dysregulation of some important neurotransmitters you get."Under normal circumstances, gentle, rhythmic contractions on the bowel walls push the fecal material along the five-foot length of the colon toward the rectum. In IBS, however, these contractions are irregular and poorly coordinated, so that the fecal material is either retained too long - resulting in constipation - or expelled too soon, producing diarrhea.""TYPICAL FEATURES The most common symptom of IBS is pain, typically in the lower left side of the abdomen, but pain may be anywhere in the abdomen and even in the back. The pain results from excessive bowel-muscle spasms and from the buildup of gas and fecal material in the colon. Pain can range from sharp abdominal cramps to a dull, continuous ache and usually worsens soon after eating. Pain is typically relieved by defecation or the passage of gas. Abdominal pain is often accompanied by constipation. If the fecal material is held in the colon too long by cramping, excessive amounts of water may be absorbed, and the feces become dry and hard. After a few days, a hard stool is produced, followed by several softer stools. Hard pellet-like stools may occur. The disturbance in bowel function that characterizes IBS may also produce diarrhea. The diarrhea typically occurs immediately after a meal or upon arising in the morning and is accompanied by a strong urge to defecate. The stools are typically soft and watery and are sometimes flecked with mucus. The mucus is clear, thick, and slightly sticky looking. Occasionally, a few drops of fresh blood may be noticed in the stool, usually a result of rectal irritation. Other symptoms of IBS include bloating, heartburn, belching, gas, loss of appetite, nausea and rarely, vomiting. IBS may also be associated with a number of symptoms that are unrelated to the digestive system, including fatigue, anxiety, difficulty in concentrating, headaches, shortness of breath, and dizziness. Because the symptoms of IBS closely mimic the symptoms of other, more serious digestive disorders, your doctor may wish to perform a variety of additional tests to exclude these disorders and to be certain of the diagnosis. If so, the nature and purpose of each test will be explained to you."Again some of the relationships to other symptoms and disorders is tied to the dysregulation of important neurotransmitter chemicals between the ens( gut) and the brain and back.You might also want to read the post I posted on stress , as there is an altered fight or flight stress responce that stimulates the immune system to be turned on all the time and plays a part in the symptoms of c and d and d predominate IBS and also in pain aspects of IBS.
 

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Your welcome Austin.Do to the dysregulation of some important neurotransmitters you get."Under normal circumstances, gentle, rhythmic contractions on the bowel walls push the fecal material along the five-foot length of the colon toward the rectum. In IBS, however, these contractions are irregular and poorly coordinated, so that the fecal material is either retained too long - resulting in constipation - or expelled too soon, producing diarrhea.""TYPICAL FEATURES The most common symptom of IBS is pain, typically in the lower left side of the abdomen, but pain may be anywhere in the abdomen and even in the back. The pain results from excessive bowel-muscle spasms and from the buildup of gas and fecal material in the colon. Pain can range from sharp abdominal cramps to a dull, continuous ache and usually worsens soon after eating. Pain is typically relieved by defecation or the passage of gas. Abdominal pain is often accompanied by constipation. If the fecal material is held in the colon too long by cramping, excessive amounts of water may be absorbed, and the feces become dry and hard. After a few days, a hard stool is produced, followed by several softer stools. Hard pellet-like stools may occur. The disturbance in bowel function that characterizes IBS may also produce diarrhea. The diarrhea typically occurs immediately after a meal or upon arising in the morning and is accompanied by a strong urge to defecate. The stools are typically soft and watery and are sometimes flecked with mucus. The mucus is clear, thick, and slightly sticky looking. Occasionally, a few drops of fresh blood may be noticed in the stool, usually a result of rectal irritation. Other symptoms of IBS include bloating, heartburn, belching, gas, loss of appetite, nausea and rarely, vomiting. IBS may also be associated with a number of symptoms that are unrelated to the digestive system, including fatigue, anxiety, difficulty in concentrating, headaches, shortness of breath, and dizziness. Because the symptoms of IBS closely mimic the symptoms of other, more serious digestive disorders, your doctor may wish to perform a variety of additional tests to exclude these disorders and to be certain of the diagnosis. If so, the nature and purpose of each test will be explained to you."Again some of the relationships to other symptoms and disorders is tied to the dysregulation of important neurotransmitter chemicals between the ens( gut) and the brain and back.You might also want to read the post I posted on stress , as there is an altered fight or flight stress responce that stimulates the immune system to be turned on all the time and plays a part in the symptoms of c and d and d predominate IBS and also in pain aspects of IBS.
 
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