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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i am sure that there is someone here that can elate to my problem,i have been diegnosed IBS-Di will just tell u about the last one i had they are all pretty much the same.it is 2 30 in the morning i awake in aggonising pain and im thinking oh no!!! in agonising pain i run into the bathroom i try to go i cant.the spasam calms and i take a moment to brace my self for the next wave of pain to hit...then here it comes it is so strong that i am on the potty begging god to make it go away as i start shaking, my body temp rises ,i am holding my stomach and pushing as hard as i can trying to make something come out.i can here my tummy making this gurgling sound.and then another spasam then another.it can last up to 3 or hours at a time.then when i can finally go to the bathroom my stool is like pure water 3 to 5 times of having water stools before my colan begens to settle down.after that i am so physicly drained i can barly make it back into bed.i am on meds but they provide no help.thank you for taking time to read this and i would like to know if there are any other people like me and do any of you have any advice.thnk you for readingchristy
 

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Christy, I read your plight and just had to sign up on this forum to respond. I've been there and I don't want to go back! I have spent nights (in the past) with the same pains and thought I would die, it was so intense. I've been able to overcome those dreadful nights. Here's what has worked for me, I hope it helps you and/or others:The problem for me seems to be diet, as it probably is for most IBS sufferers. The key for me is high fiber and little variation in my daily diet. I've heard others have success with the diet on ...com, which I've considered giving a try. What I do now is somewhat contradictory to that site, but seems to work for the most part.Primary solution - I start the day with 12+ grams of fiber in Kellogg's All Bran. I used to eat the 'Extra Fiber' variety, but have since found the 'All Bran Flakes with Yogurt Bites' variety, which is a lot less like 'rabbit food' than the others. I eat 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 cups every day. It is important for me to eat the same amount each day. If I miss a day of eating it, my system gets messed up (gas and gassy pains, slight constipation or loos stools) for about a week trying to readjust. I take the cereal with me on vacations, premeasured if I won't have any way to measure it while away from home.Secondary soltion - The rest of the day is pretty flexible, as long as I avoid foods I know will trigger a reaction. The foods I avoid are: extra spicy foods, cheeses, raisins, bananas (1/2 or less is usually OK), fresh apples, most fast food restaurants, Pizza Hut (had a bad 'D' experience there once after eating a pizza), most soda pop from dispensers in restaurants. There are more, no doubt, but these are the biggies for me.I also try to get in more fiber during the day, to get around the recommended 25 grams, with an All Bran bar (no, I don't work for Kellogg's ;-) I just like their fiber products) and 'Extra Fiber' wheat bread for my sandwhiches (these have about 4-5 grams of fiber per slice, 8-10 grams for a sandwich!).Dinner can be just about anything, as long as it isn't too spicy. I also try to eat around the same time each day, especially breakfast. This works for me as long as I am consistent with it. It keeps me VERY regular, almost like clockwork
. As I said earlier, I'm highly considering trying the ...com diet to see if it will allow more variation for me without the week long adjustment I have to go through if I eat differently than the previous day.I think there are different solutions for different people, that there is no one solution for everyone. If you give this a try, I hope it helps. If not, I know you'll find some other suggestion that works for you. IBS is not beyond dealing with, it's just that you need to experiment to find out what works. Either way, I'll be praying for you especially this week that you'll find some relief....SOON.Don't give up.
 

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christy sounds like IBS and what IBS can do to a person.There are a few ways to address the problems.Here is some infohttp://hopkins-gi.nts.jhu.edu/pages/latin/...se=43&lang_id=1IBS is a physical condition and they have found abnormalities.Question:What progress has been made in finding a theory in the development of IBS? Answer: IBS occurs when there is a dysfunction in the regulation of how the brain and gut talk to each other. Diet, stress, hormones, and infection can all affect a person's sensitivity to this condition. There's a brain-gut connection, and if the bowel is distressed, it's not unusual to get anxious. Mental stress may also cause the bowel to become distressed. -- Douglas Drossman, professor of medicine and psychiatry at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and co-director of the UNC Center for Functional GI and Utility Disorders. What's happening now is that there is an increasing recognition that IBS is a problem that is occurring in both the central nervous system and the gut and the interplay between the two. That is giving us a much better handle on mechanisms involved. Therefore, we now have a lot of new ideas and more scientific evidence that are leading to more effective treatments. -- Ray E. Clouse, MD, professor of medicine and psychiatry in the division of gastroenterology at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. http://www.webmd.com/content/article/65/79519.htmboth the gut and the brain are operational to cause the symptoms.Many people don't know there is a kind of "brain" in the gut directly connected to the brain. Both the gut and the brain are "operational" to cause the symptoms.Complex and Hidden Brain in Gut Makes Bellyaches and Butterflieshttp://www.aikidoaus.com.au/dojo/docs/2nd_braina.htmHavard, John Hopkins, UNC, IFFGD, UCLA, Vanderbuilt, Ohio State and many others.The Gut-Brain Connection Recent studies show that functional GI symptoms are not necessarily the result of dysfunction in the bowel, but may be due to disturbances in brain-gut pathways. By Harvard Health Reports http://www.lhj.com/lhj/story.jhtml?storyid...atref=cat910018Gastro ProDiagnosis and management of irritable bowel syndromehttp://www.gastro-pro.org/index.html?http&...ibs/ibs-03.htmlandMedGenMed GastroenterologyIBS -- Review and What's NewPosted 07/26/2006"Serotonin SignalingOf the putative mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of IBS, the strongest evidence points to the role of serotonin in the GI tract. The effect of serotonergic mechanisms in the manifestation of IBS symptoms has led to development of a new drug class for the treatment of IBS patients: the GI serotonergic agents.Normal GI function relies on a properly functioning brain-gut axis, which involves the coordinated interplay of the GI musculature, the CNS, the autonomic nervous system, and the enteric nervous system (ENS). The ENS contains millions of neurons embedded in the wall of the digestive tract and functions, at least in part, independently of the CNS. The size, complexity, and independent function of the ENS has resulted in application of the terms "the second brain" and "the mini-brain."[81] Impaired function or coordination of any of these systems, or the communication between these systems and the GI musculature, can lead to symptoms of dysmotility and altered sensory perception, which are characteristic of IBS and select other GI motility disorders.[82]The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) is a predominant signaling molecule in the ENS. Most (90% to 95%) of the body's serotonin is found in the gut, and smaller amounts are found in the brain (about 3%) and in platelets (about 2%).[83] In the GI tract, serotonin facilitates communication between the ENS and its effector systems (muscles, secretory endothelium, endocrine cells, and vasculature of the GI tract), thus playing a key role in normal GI tract functioning.[84] In addition, serotonin plays a role in the communication between the ENS and the CNS.In the gut, serotonin is synthesized by and stored in the enterochromaffin cells, which are located within the mucosa of the intestinal wall. When material passes through the lumen and the mucosa is stimulated, enterochromaffin cells release serotonin, which then binds to its receptors (primarily 5-HT1P receptors) on intrinsic primary afferent neurons, initiating peristalsis and secretion. Serotonin also binds to 5-HT4 receptors on interneurons, which augments the transmission of signals to motor neurons, resulting in enhanced peristaltic activity. In transgenic mice lacking 5-HT4 receptors, colonic motility is abnormally slow, confirming the role of these receptors in facilitating normal colonic motility.[85] By binding to 5-HT3 receptors on efferent sensory innervations coming from the vagus and the spinal nerves, serotonin mediates signaling between the ENS and the CNS and, thus, modulates pain perception.To regulate the signaling process, excess serotonin must be removed; this is accomplished by the SERT molecule expressed by intestinal epithelial cells.[86] Human studies have shown that defects in serotonin signaling contribute to the pathophysiology of IBS and, potentially, other GI motility disorders. In a recent study by Coates and colleagues,[87] biopsy specimens from patients with IBS showed significantly lower mucosal serotonin concentrations than those from healthy controls, potentially the result of lower mRNA levels for tryptophan hydroxylase (the rate-limiting enzyme in serotonin synthesis), which were also significantly lower in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.[87] There was no significant difference in the number of enterochromaffin cells or in the capacity of these cells to release serotonin under stimulated conditions. In another study, higher serotonin levels were observed in mucosal biopsy samples from patients with IBS with constipation (IBS-C) than in patients with IBS-D or in healthy volunteers.[88]Serotonin levels may also be affected by altering the amount or function of SERT. The study by Coates and colleagues[87] showed a significant decrease in the level of SERT mRNA and SERT protein expressed in the intestinal epithelial cells of IBS patients compared with that of healthy volunteers. In another study,[89] SERT expression and binding capacity in platelets were decreased in women with IBS-D compared with expression and binding capacity in healthy controls. Furthermore, Chen and colleagues[90] showed that mice with a SERT gene deletion had altered colonic motility. It is interesting to note that the mice thrived in laboratory housing conditions, indicating that other transporters could compensate for the lack of SERT. Additional studies have focused on SERT polymorphisms. Yeo and colleagues[91] showed an association between patients with IBS-D and the homozygous short polymorphism of the SERT gene promoter. This mutation results in lower levels of SERT gene transcription and reduced amounts of SERT protein available for reuptake of serotonin. In addition, Camilleri and colleagues[92] showed a possible link between the long promoter polymorphism and patient response to therapy.Thus, a substantially large body of work shows that normal gut physiology is predicated on the interplay between the GI musculature and the ENS, autonomic nervous system, and CNS. One of the central mediators of this complex interplay is the neurotransmitter serotonin. Impairment or imbalance in serotonergic signaling, which can affect GI motility, secretion, and visceral sensitivity, may be affected by defects or deficiencies in serotonin production, specific serotonin receptors, or proteins such as SERT. These changes can manifest in symptoms associated with IBS, including abdominal pain, altered bowel habits (constipation, diarrhea, or alternation between these 2 states), and bloating."http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/532089_printand some good food infoNutritional Intervention for IBS http://ibsgroup.org/groupee/forums/a/tpc/f...261/m/474108222
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thank you for your advice,will deffintly try it.i would try anything to stop the pain.and please pray for me....i do need to ask u if you have 1 colonoscopy do u need another,it has been 8 yrars since my last one.thank you so much,christy
 

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I would get a doctor's recommendation about the colonoscopy. I haven't had one yet, but do have diverticulosis (pockets in the colon) in my family history, so maybe I should. Actually, the fiber treatment was originally to ease the possibility of producing the pockets in my colon due to excessive pressure. That it helped my IBS was an added bonus and my daily motivation to keep it going.
 

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I'm new to this forum too, and I saw your post and HAD to reply.You sound exactly like me. The spasms, the shaking, the begging, the gurgle, the water stool. And as much as I don't wish this disease on anyone else, I'm so thankful to see someone else describe so perfectly what I go through. We're not alone!I also try to eat as much fiber as possible. I've run into some problems, because a lot of the really high fiber foods I just can't stomach. So I take a lot of fiber supplements. It doesn't prevent every episode, but it helps.I also avoid trigger foods when I can. One of my main ones is soda fountain sodas in resaurants, so I stick to bottled products whenever I can. I also eat VERY light when I go out, just in case.My doctor gave me Levsin to take, and I think that helped some too, although not totally. In some regards it was a mental security blanket.The other thing that I've found to help, not with the physical symptoms, but with coping .. is to TELL the people close to me what's going on. So I don't get pressured to go out and have dinner, and if we ARE out, people understand if I run to the bathroom, or come back saying I need to go home NOW, and whatever noises/smells occur in the car I'm not apoligizing for. Yes it's embarassing at first, but just the idea of not hiding it from everyone makes me feel more free with the idea that I CAN go places and if it happens, well .. it happens.I hope you find solutions that work for you. Feel better!
 

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I had EXACTLY the same thing happen to me during the night last night, at around the same time 2AM.It was horrible I don't think I can remember a time when I was in more pain. It was excruciating. I just can't go on like this for much longer! :-(
 

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I just joined too and I could have written your post! What happens to you is pretty much exactly what happens to me, except mine usually occurs within two hours of eating dinner instead of in the middle of the night. I unfortunately don't have any great advice about what helps, although I know that fatty foods are a major trigger for me, so I try to avoid those. Identifying your trigger foods might help. I just wanted to put up another post confirmong your experience to let you know that you're not alone.
 

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Hi. I'm new to posting but have been lurking for a long time. I so can relate to being awakened at all hours of the night with cramps, straining, pleading, praying to just "go" already so I can get back to sleep. Except I know that this is always a many hours process. When the cramps start I wish that I can just get it out. But NOOOO! I must make many trips to the potty all for nothing at first. Does anyone get the hypersalivation? My mouth will just totally fill up with salty water that I have to keep spitting out into the trashcan. This usually happens right before the gurgles. Then finally after I start to go, I quit salivating. Funny thing too is my nose will get all congested then drippy. What the heck is wrong with me. IBS is what the doctors say after all the tests were done. I've had the barium enema, Colonoscopy, Sigmoidiscope Lactose intolerence test (I am that). IBS totally ruins my life. I can't plan anything cause I am afraid my bowels will act up. I do take Librax but it makes me sleepy. Sorry for the rant, But Christy, I feel your pain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i know IBS ruins peoples lives, i went to dallas tx to the nascar race my dad had bought my husband and i tickets for christmas.any way,we left our hotel room at 6 am. we drove to the track and dad made breakfast in the parking lot.all i ate was pancakes.and wouldnt u know it here it come as we were looking around and shopping for souviners.all of the sudden i get the pains in my tummy,i was litterally running in and out of the porta pottys.for about four hours.i had read a personal artical about a woman with ibs that said if u go somewhere u can forget going in the privacy of your clean bathroom.there i was in a stinky nasty porto potty.and this is imberrasing but one time i went in the porto patty i was in so much pain i forgot to lock the door and someone opened it up while i was in there.any way the IBS ruined my day,and i couldnt enjoy myself.i can have them at any time of the dayor anytime of the night.they are not just at night.and the bad thing was i had set my pills out to take and accidietly left them at home.thanks for reading,christy
 

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That sounds miserable!Whenever we go anywhere that doesn't have decent bathrooms, I just don't eat. How sad is that? I mean, really.But after spending 3 hours in a Home Depot bathroom one night ... I just can't do it anymore.I try to not let it stop me from living though. I still try to go out, try to do things .. I just try to do them without food.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
i just want to say thank you for everybody that has responded.this really means alot i have tryed self help and dr help,stronger meds dietery changes.but once i discovered one morning that i had developed hemmeroids i was in total shock!!!! i said THATS IT !!!i got on the computer to see what all i could find out about the IBS.and searched through 70 plus sights on the internet and a couple of hours later i ended up here.and i thank God for this sight.and the people in it.now when i am in severe pain i will know that i am not alone,and belive me that helps out alot.christy
 

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Christy you have my total empathy... Me too!!! Triggers that set me off are high fatty foods eg crisps are a no-no, ice-cream, cheese and acidic foods eg red wine (boo!) Also a trigger for me is high temperatures above 30 degrees. Your tale was me in Spain last week, in my parents'-in-laws' bathroom 7/8 times in one day. I just take diarolyte to rehydrate and relax - I give myself over to it. I find that the spasms stop but the D gets over and done with much quicker. Chin up! Thinking of you next time I'm there...
 
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