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Hey everyone. Every once in a while, I stop in and see if anyone has any ideas that could help me.I am 24. A few years ago I started having 'attacks'. Each and everytime, these attacks include: Painful nausea Vomiting (better described as violent retching) Sudden, ubcontrollable diahrrea Pain, upper, middle stomach Lots of belching during the attack, which smell like vomit (I can always tell when my attack is nearly over when my burps taste/smell like food instead of gastric juices) I cannot eat, drink or take any meds by mouth, as even the swallowing of my spit will cause my stomach to cramp even moreA normal attack will last from 12-24 hours. I am in near constant agony the whole time. I normally have to layer towels under myself in bed, because I lose control of my bowels when I vomit.These attacks happen sometimes up to 3 times a week, for 1 - 2 months. Then they dissapear, and in the interim I am perfectly well.The E.R. docs have not been able to give me anything to stop the vomiting. The only time something seemed to help was when they sedated me because I was nearly hysterical from the pain.A couple docs I have seen have diagnosed me with IBS, perscribed me with antispasmodics and sent me on my way. I have have scopes in both ends, stomach x-rays, ultra-sounds, blood work, urine/stool tests. Everything turns up normal. Aside from anti-spasmodics, I have tried a host of other meds from phenergan to zanax to nitro pills. Nothing works, and if I try to take something shortly before/during my attacks, I simply throw it up.This has been horrifying psychologically. I have no idea when I am going to get sick, and know that once it starts there is nothing I can do to end the pain. Until yesterday, I hadnt been sick for a couple months. Now its begun all over again.Any ideas?Ohnometo, we have talked before about CVS. I mentioned that to my last GI doc and he said he had never even heard of it. Acted like I couldnt be diagnosed with something he hadnt heard of.One good thing, I will be seeing a new GI doc, a friend of my moms, one week from today. He doesnt want me to even bring any of my charts, as he wants to start completely fresh. He wants to do all my tests over again (including the scopes
) but I know he'll stick with me until he has figured out whats wrong.Sorry this has been so long, I just really feel scared and alone when this starts up. My husband isnt what I'd call really supportive, although he loves me.marriah
 

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Hi Marriah,I'm sorry youre going thru so much..hope you'll get better soon. I'm not sure, but in my opinion, this definitely isn't IBS...I know other ppl on this BB will reply to u soon and hope you find out more answers from them...in the meantime, I'll have you in my prayers and hope u tide through this difficult time. God bless...and hope your new GI can help you more..
 

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MarriahNot many Doctors has heard of it...If you can tell me where you live I can find you a Doctor in that area...I am on the outreach team for Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome...Also every symptom you described is a symptom of CVS even the diahreah and high abdominal pain. You can email me at dstephen###tlcdelivers.com. Here is the website to CVS http://www.cvsaonline.org Go on their message board and post any questions you might have...If this is what you might have there is hope and you dont have to suffer...It only took them 40 years to diagnose mine..
There is a combination of medications they use to stop the pain and vomiting...The only way to stop the vomiting once it starts is with the right medications...Just because the Doctors hasnt heard of it dont mean it isnt real !!!! None of the Doctors I went to for 40 years ever heard of it...I have been to the hospital so many times and have layed there for days in pain and vomiting and NOTHING stopped it NOTHING.....I dont have to live like that any more
 

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What is CVS?Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome is characterized by recurrent, prolonged episodes of severe vomiting, nausea and prostration with no apparent cause. Once considered rare, CVS is now a common disorder. The episodes are self-limited and tend to be similar to each other in symptoms and duration. Occurrences are often not predictable and usually end in a dramatically sudden way regardless of treatment. CVS usually persists from years to decades. Difficult to DiagnoseCVS has been difficult to diagnose because it is seldom seen in clinical practice and because vomiting may be caused by a large number of disorders other than (and more common than) CVS. There are as yet no laboratory tests, x-rays or other technical procedures used to diagnose the disorder. The diagnosis is made by careful review of the patient's history, physical examination and studies to rule-out other diseases which may cause vomiting. "CVS is more diffuse in it's presentation than adult migraine and takes more time to diagnose, but it is almost as definite when evidence is accumulated." CVS is probably massively under or mis-diagnosed. EpisodesEpisodes almost always begin at night or when waking in the morning. Symptoms include forceful repeated vomiting and retching, as often every 5 to 10 minutes and can continue for hours or days (one to five days most common). These episodes can be accompanied by unrelenting nausea, extreme lethargy and a 'ghastly' pallor. The patient usually sleeps around the clock when not vomiting. Patients describe being in a stupor during the episode, a state of confusion and total exhaustion with no control over their body's reactions. This state has been described as a "conscious coma". They will resist talking and swallowing both of which cause more nausea and vomiting. Drooling or an accumulation of saliva in the mouth is very characteristic. Thirst is often intense even though taking fluids results almost immediately in vomiting. Patients explain that it is better to vomit dilute rather than concentrated gastric acid and the urge to vomit precedes the urge to drink. The vomitus is bile-stained and often bloody from esophageal irritation. There may also be abdominal pain, headache, dizziness, low-grade fever and/or diarrhea. The symptoms of this disorder are frightening to both the child and family and can be life-threatening due to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Contributing FactorsAt the onset of an episode, the patient may be aware of being excited or under positive or negative stress (birthdays, holidays, vacations). Food sensitivities, infections, colds or flu, anesthetic, injury and pain are reported triggers. Other episodes are random and unpredictable and occur for no apparent reason. TreatmentTreatment is generally supportive with much importance placed on early intervention . It is critical to create a dark quiet environment for sleep. Laboratory test can rule out other causes. Hospitalization and IV fluid replacement may be needed during episodes. Medication trials sometimes succeed in finding something to prevent, abort or shorten the episodes. The value of using stress management techniques where appropriate should be recognized. Long Term ManagementThe foundation of long-term management ...involves a responsive collaborative doctor-patient-family relationship, sensitive to stresses caused by the illness and to feelings and attitudes that may predispose to attacks." Consistent, accessible physician care by a care coordinator who understands and communicates the nature of CVS, regardless of specialty, is vital to the family's well-being. Occasional care conferences go a long way to smooth management for all involved. Connections with the Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association-USA/Canada (CVSA-USA/Canada), a family/professional network, does a great deal toward healing a family that has been in doubt and despair for years. CVS vs. Abdominal MigraineCyclic Vomiting Syndrome - nausea or vomiting with no known cause - may or may not have abdominal pain or headache.Abdominal Migraine - looks like CVS with intense debilitating abdominal pain usually centered around the navel - kids are unable to carry on with activity. often is accompanied by vomiting. this can come on very suddenly and last from about 2 hours up to days. there are no apparent causes for the pain. no laboratory or x-ray findings. this seems to be associated with the same sort of mechanism that causes migraine headaches but there is no head pain. Related Termsabdominal or juvenile migraine, bilious attacks, periodic syndrome, recurrent vomiting References Gee. "On fitful or recurrent vomiting" St. Bartholomew's Hosp Rept. 1882;18:1-6. Cullen. "The Periodic Syndrome" Med J of Australia. 1963; Aug 3:167-173. Ibid. Fleisher. "The cyclic vomiting syndrome" J Ped GI & Nutr. 1993;17:361-369. Current descriptive article: Li BUK, Balint J: Cyclic vomiting syndrome, the evolution of understanding of a brain-gut disorder. Advances in Pediatrics 47:117-160, 2000 The Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association (CVSA-USA/Canada-USA/Canada) has grown from a handful of 18 families and 3 main professional advisors in April 1993 to a membership of approximately 700 with 37 professional advisors. We communicate with two other associations (Australia & and UK) and contact families in numerous countries worldwide. Our three-pronged mission of family support, education and now financial support of research has been realized continuously. Of late there have been several major projects and developments of note
 
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