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Hi everyone, I'm new here to the board and I have enjoyed reading your messages. I have learned SO much and it has helped me deal with my problems (bloating/gas/occasional C then D) Question for you all: have any of you noticed a link between eating leftovers & getting gas, feeling bloated and/or getting diarrhea? just wondering what you think. Thanks.
 

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1. Leftover rice can be unhappy due to bacillus cereus spores, which are not killed in cooking, starting to grow viable bacyeria in the leftovers. Put leftover rice in the fridge ASAP and I would not eat it if I was diarrhea prone if it was more than 24 hours old. Don't feed it to little kids with immature oral tolerance.B. cereus food poisoning is the general description, although two recognized types of illness are caused by two distinct metabolites. The diarrheal type of illness is caused by a large molecular weight protein, while the vomiting (emetic) type of illness is believed to be caused by a low molecular weight, heat-stable peptide. 2. Rule of thumb on leftovers other than rice is 3 days...though I should check with one of my RD's as they may refute this.Otherwise leftovers are no more antigenic innately than the food when it is just cooked except some wherein their antigenic properties are concentrated when cooked the way they are (see below). Some staple foods antigenic properties change with cooking and/or processing...look what happens to cows milk when we make all that we make from it...all kinds of antigenicity can be added...OR removed...depends on the person.4. Some foods when cooked contain endogenous chemicals which are not destroyed in cooking which, in the raw food, may casue no gastric problems but when you cook the food down iot concentrates the chemicals or concentrates the antigenicity of the food.I like tomato as an example. I can eat a small amount of raw tomato or cooked tomato pieces. BUT cook it down down down into tomato sauce and my toelrance foes WAYYY down...takes only a little tomato sauce to produce a reaction.You might find this book helpful at understanding the subject of foods, tolerance and intolerance in all its permuatations:�FOOD ALLERGIES AND FOOD INTOLERANCE: THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO THEIR IDENTIFICTION AND TREATMENT�, Professor Jonathan Brostoff , M.D.. Allergy, Immunology and Environmental Medicine, Kings� College, London http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/089...6487508-3420903 If someone is a dictor or dietcian or really really interested, this new textbook for physicians is a treasure trove of info on the subject but its ....mmmm....heavy in more ways than one:FOOD ALLERGY AND INTOLERANCE, Professor Jonathan Brostoff, MD, Stephen Challacombe, MD (NEW 2002) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/070...product-details MNL
 

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I'm glad to see that I'm not the only one who has faced this problem. There are days that I can eat the world's most yummie meal and the next day the left overs will kill me. I can always tell when it is food related, I die for about 1-2 hours and then feel fine. This is tuff for someone who likes to cook.Thanks for the info.Chuck
 

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I only have a problem with leftovers that are a trigger food. In general if I could for two days prior and a day or two after eating something that is a moderate trigger i am fine but if I eat leftovers of said moderate trigger its to much for my system and I get to visit my friend
 
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