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How come with all the churning and squeezing, etc. that goes on with normal digestion, we don't feel anything inside of us unless we are sick? The intestines are contracting and relaxing all the time but we don't feel this. Why is this?
 

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It's kinda along the lines of why don't we see every photon that enters our eyes, don't feel the watch we are wearing, hear all noises that come into our ears, etc etc.....Your body and sensory organs collect WAY more information than you are ever conciously aware of. Pretty much all the information that you are conciously aware of is highly processed and filtered. This is an adaptable process (like if you put glasses on that flip everything upside down after a while what you see flips back over again...until you take the glasses off then you have to readapt).There appear to be gateways and thresh-holds for information. If it is below the thresh hold it may not get through the gateway. One of the potential problem in IBS is that the gateway for sensation between the gut and the brain is open too much of the time and normal sensations that you shouldn't be feeling are being transmitted.Your concious brain can only handle X amount of info at a time so parts of the brain filter the information so you only get X amount. Alot of this is based on what you are concentrating on so you can hear the person next to you talking in a noisy environment. When you stop concentrating on things sometimes sensations or information you aren't aware of most of the time sometimes surface. For instance I tend to have an all over low grade body itch. As long as I'm busy it can't get into the concious awareness, but when I'm going to sleep or like right now I am writing about the itching so my brain thinks I WANT to know about all the itches
then the infomation comes to the foreground. Unfortunately the conciousness wants the same amount of info even when you block the input...so things that are normally not let in get let in when you are relaxed or are less focused on a specific thing.What is intersting is that experiments have shown you can act on the information you are not conciously aware of. Some examples of this are blind-sight where someone has lost the brain parts that make vision concious, but can still respond to visual stimuli they cannot conciously see.K.
 

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It's kinda along the lines of why don't we see every photon that enters our eyes, don't feel the watch we are wearing, hear all noises that come into our ears, etc etc.....Your body and sensory organs collect WAY more information than you are ever conciously aware of. Pretty much all the information that you are conciously aware of is highly processed and filtered. This is an adaptable process (like if you put glasses on that flip everything upside down after a while what you see flips back over again...until you take the glasses off then you have to readapt).There appear to be gateways and thresh-holds for information. If it is below the thresh hold it may not get through the gateway. One of the potential problem in IBS is that the gateway for sensation between the gut and the brain is open too much of the time and normal sensations that you shouldn't be feeling are being transmitted.Your concious brain can only handle X amount of info at a time so parts of the brain filter the information so you only get X amount. Alot of this is based on what you are concentrating on so you can hear the person next to you talking in a noisy environment. When you stop concentrating on things sometimes sensations or information you aren't aware of most of the time sometimes surface. For instance I tend to have an all over low grade body itch. As long as I'm busy it can't get into the concious awareness, but when I'm going to sleep or like right now I am writing about the itching so my brain thinks I WANT to know about all the itches
then the infomation comes to the foreground. Unfortunately the conciousness wants the same amount of info even when you block the input...so things that are normally not let in get let in when you are relaxed or are less focused on a specific thing.What is intersting is that experiments have shown you can act on the information you are not conciously aware of. Some examples of this are blind-sight where someone has lost the brain parts that make vision concious, but can still respond to visual stimuli they cannot conciously see.K.
 

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K, did you watch Nova's "secrets of the mind", just wondering if that is where you got some of the blind sight info.Sometimes in IBS the neurotransmitters are regulating right and sometimes there not and you get IBS symptoms.
 

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K, did you watch Nova's "secrets of the mind", just wondering if that is where you got some of the blind sight info.Sometimes in IBS the neurotransmitters are regulating right and sometimes there not and you get IBS symptoms.
 

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Nope, most of my info came from various articles in Science and Nature mostly back in th 1980's and a really cool issue of New Scientist from 5 Sept 1998 about the "zombie mind" which talked about how there seems to be two minds our concious mind and an unconcious mind that can and does act without our concious input.The thing that made a lot of sense to me is the concious mind is very very good and figuring things out like if you plant the seed here, you will have more of this to eat later....it isn't very good at must make choice NOW things like which of the branches whizzing by me should I grab....by the time it works through that you've passed all the branches and hit the ground. The "zombie" mind is (to paraphrase the Click and Clack Brothers) unencumbered by the thought process and can grab the branch without having to figure out if it is the right one first.Some suggest that the "zombie" mind may be part of what causes "flow state" type processes. The concious mind has trained the "zombie" mind to do a task and when it gets out of the way there is an unusual level of skill, grace, etc that people enter and they often perform extremely well. Athletes often talk about this type of thing after a game they played particularly well. It may also have something to do with intuition. That when you don't know how you know something....but it is the right answer.K.
 

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Nope, most of my info came from various articles in Science and Nature mostly back in th 1980's and a really cool issue of New Scientist from 5 Sept 1998 about the "zombie mind" which talked about how there seems to be two minds our concious mind and an unconcious mind that can and does act without our concious input.The thing that made a lot of sense to me is the concious mind is very very good and figuring things out like if you plant the seed here, you will have more of this to eat later....it isn't very good at must make choice NOW things like which of the branches whizzing by me should I grab....by the time it works through that you've passed all the branches and hit the ground. The "zombie" mind is (to paraphrase the Click and Clack Brothers) unencumbered by the thought process and can grab the branch without having to figure out if it is the right one first.Some suggest that the "zombie" mind may be part of what causes "flow state" type processes. The concious mind has trained the "zombie" mind to do a task and when it gets out of the way there is an unusual level of skill, grace, etc that people enter and they often perform extremely well. Athletes often talk about this type of thing after a game they played particularly well. It may also have something to do with intuition. That when you don't know how you know something....but it is the right answer.K.
 
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