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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My GI emailed me and told me of a patient of hers that went to see a complimentary doc for ibs and interstitial cystitis. This doc gave her d-mannose. My GI could not believe how well this made her feel. She told me that in reading about it, she felt that maybe it could be of use for SIBO/IBS.I am afraid to try it as I fear it could cause gas. This is a top GI by the way.
 

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It's just a sugar like glucose. I'm not sure how well it's absorbed, but not anywhere near as well as glucose. I suspect it would have an effect similar to that lactose/fructose in large amounts. Might be useful for constipation and might as you mention cause gas. It would probably make SIBO worse. I don't have any explanation for how it helped other than it simply may be a placebo effect.
 

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I'm not really sure how one makes the leap of it helps for IC to it helps IBS/SIBO?After all I don't think there is a lot that is the same other than they are chronic and painful.http://icnshop.com/cgi-bin/ustorekeeper.pl...I_Products.html has one of the theories of why it supposedly works, but I'm not sure how much gets into the bladder or if IC is caused by E.coli. After all I thought that IC is when you feel like you have a bladder infection all the time but there isn't any bacteria to be causing the infection
I also don't know if pharmacokinetically how much mannose is excreted through the kidneys and into the bladder. K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
flux,This is the email my GI sent me. Hi Pete, Thanks for the information about naltrexone. I wanted to also tell you about something my patient is taking. She is a scientist who has IBS and interstitial cystitis. Her interstitial cystitis has been particularly refractory to treatment and painful. She was seen by a complementary alternative medicine provider who suggested that she take D-mannose. Within 24 hours, she had a reduction in pain and is continuing to do well. I couldn't find much information about it but I think mannose is involved in immune pathways and binds bacteria from adhering to the mucosa. Patients with deficiencies of mannose-binding proteins are at a greater risk of developing lupes (SLE). I thought that might be something you would be interested in looking into. She gets it at a health food store and is manufactured by NOW (Nutrition for Optimal Wellness) Corporation and it is also available over the internet. I hope you have a Happy New Year.
 

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quote:I think mannose is involved in immune pathways and binds bacteria from adhering to the mucosa.
OK, I wasn't even thinking of that. I think the basic logic is that some of our cells have mannose-containing compounds on their surface and certain bacteria use that to help them get attached. The logic of taking the mannose is the bacteria will bind to the free-floating mannose and not to our cells.I'm not sure this would work in practice. For one thing, it sounds like it would work for only certain bacteria and where you can get mannose delivered and only before an infection got going. And even then, I'm not sure it would be effective. For something to be so simple and so effective it would handily revolutionize medicine. So I'm not so convinced that that mannose was responsible for this person's improvement, though it is a neat idea.I'm even more doubtful about its ability to affect SIBO because I'm not sure SIBO necessarily requires bacteria bind to the mucosa of the small bowel. It's the lack of motility that allows bacteria to grow significant numbers.
quote:patients with deficiencies of mannose-binding proteins are at a greater risk of developing lupes (SLE)
I think this is something different. Certain bacteria also have mannose on their surface and our bodies have this protein that binds to it and to help the body detect bacteria (here the mannose could potentially interfere with our body's antibacterial activity). And apparently, some people with lupus have a deficiency of this binding protein. Presumably, that would make them more prone to infections, so I don't know how it relates to lupus.
 

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Here's the description for NOW D-Mannose:Women of every age can support healthy urinary function by supplementing with this all natural, simple sugar derived from the cranberry. The urinary track acts like a magnet to bacteria. As urine is excreted, bacterial lectins take the liberty of adhering to the bladder's inner lining. D-Mannose attaches itself to these harmful bacteria, allowing them to be easily washed away during urination. And because of its unique molecular structure, only tiny amounts of D-mannose are processes by the body as sugar, while most are cleansed as they pass. 100% natural and completely safe to take, NOW D-Mannose Powder is an effortless way to achieve sound urinary health.*
 

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quote:I think mannose is involved in immune pathways and binds bacteria from adhering to the mucosa.
If the bowel movement are less sticky,perhaps it will reduce C and gas.
 

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Bacteria sticking to the lining does not make the stool sticky. They are to small to change how the stool moves, even in aggregate. They would be just like part of the lining if they were stuck to it, not also embedded in the stool holding it in place.K.
 

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I tougth stools were mostly constitute from bacterias
 

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The way I think of it is that it binds to the bad bacteria (e-coli) and takes it out of the system. Which leaves the good bacteria to do it's job better. If an individual has too much of the bad bacteria it will lead to digestion problems.Same sort of concept as taking probiotics, by trying to add more of the good bacteria. Our bodies should have 80% good to 20% bad to do it's job.
 

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Spas-I'm not denying that you don't have to prove it to me, really.I'm just saying that the bacteria stuck on the walls of the colon are not the same exact bacteria you are pooping out in the stools and that expecting that even with a lot of bacteria binding the walls you can't expect they also are bound up in the stool to stop the stool from moving.They aren't that tightly stuck to both that it is making you constipated.K.
 

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Yeah you are probably rigth.It's just a theory--->bacterias who stick to the bowel creating disconfort and C.However,it dosen't explain why i get more "sticky" with some food.
 
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