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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
when you guys consult one of these, you are'nt covered by ins. are you? I don't consult these kinds of drs at this pt in my life, b/c i am not made of money, and my ins. would not cover it. thanks!
 

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cordelia, very often these sort of practictioners are less expensive than allopathic docs and are willing to not only practice on a sliding scale (like many shrinks) but will also accept payments. naturally, this country and its barbaric medical insurance customs make me sick after 2o years in europe where acupuncture, homeopathy, and so forth are all covered by state insurance. a bit of advice: often, nutrionists are not medical MDs but are just as good when it comes to diet hence their fees are much much less. g-
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ghitta--barbaric ---is a very good term for this country's medical system and lack of respect for alternative medeicne. On your price point---I beg to differ with you....in the 90's I used to see a nutritionist who was NOT IN THE LEAST CHEAPP---he charged one hundred and fifty dollars per hour, my dear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
and yes, this guy was as good, if not better than an MD (because more to my liking on what works and what is GOOD for the body), but no, dear, he was NOT THEREFORE cheaper....that was why he could get so much for his hour of work---he was so good. sorry for my curt sounding reply, i'm just a little miffed i guess at the sense I get from your posts that this is a simple problem to solve. it is not.
 

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Actually, (in the U.S. at least) MDs have no required training in nutrition whatsoever.Cordelia, I think it is despicable for a health care practicioner to charge someone $150/hr without insurance! I am currently seeing a nutritionist for $50/hr, plus she does research on the latest ways to treat my symptoms when I'm not there.For me, it has helped to have a nutritionist both for her advice as well as her accountability. I have found it difficult to totally alter my lifestyle based on faith (ie cut out sugar and refined carbs) and when I know that she is going to ask me about it later, I am more likely to stay on task.My nutritionist is also the one who encouraged me to pressure my doctor for more testing. She got me to do bloodwork for parasite antibodies and yeast testing when I would not have pushed for it on my own. Turned out, no parasites, but totally infested with yeast. Ew.She has also tested me for iodine levels, thyroid problems, stool transit time, zinc deficiency, and food allergies. My doctor dismissed me while my nutritionist did the work. No, my insurance doesn't cover her, but she has been worth every penny.
 

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Laylo,From what I've been reading for the last several years...what they're saying is that poor nutrition is the base cause of ALL our current epidemics of disease...heart problems, diabetes, cancer, auto-immune diseases...and on and on.I've even changed my diet...but I'm keeping my coffee...one cup has the antioxidant effect of 3glasses of orange juice...so I drink 2...just to be on the safe side, you understand.
Best Regards,Wildrose
 

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Laylo,This is the HSI newsletter that I got this morning. Interesting that it deals with one of your subjects...simple sugars and carbs. I've copied it to share with you.I bet you'll appreciate your nutritionist even more after reading it.WildroseSimple MathHealth Sciences Institute e-AlertSeptember 11, 2003**************************************************************Dear Reader,While watching football last Sunday, I noticed a beer ad that claimed Miller Lite has half the carbohydrates of Budweiser Light. I was struck by the fact that a mainstream commercial was actually implying that it's good to lower your intake of carbohydrates. Of course, it's much too early to assume that the mainstream may be catching on to the fact that if everyone put as much effort into cutting their carbohydrate intake as they put into cutting cholesterol, the obesity epidemic, the type 2 diabetes epidemic, and the cardiovascular disease epidemic might eventually become non-epidemics. But as an HSI member reminded me in a recent e-mail, all carbs are not the same. So if you're trying to cut back on the carbohydrates in your diet, then it's useful to know which ones are the real culprits, and why. --------------------------------------------------------------Carbohydrates 101--------------------------------------------------------------The e-mail came from a member named John who said, "You should be educating the people about the difference between refined carbohydrates and complex carbohydrates. Refined carbohydrates are bad and complex carbohydrates are good." John is on the right track here, but we need to tweak the terminology a little bit. I asked our nutrition specialist, HSI Panelist Allan Spreen, M.D., to elaborate on John's e-mail, and he started out by noting that carbohydrate foods are basically broken down into two groups: "simple" and "complex" carbohydrates. And both of these groups can be further broken down into "refined" and "unrefined." --------------------------------------------------------------Nutrient needs--------------------------------------------------------------Let's start with the "refined simple" carbohydrates - what Dr. Spreen calls "the sweet stuff" - which includes "all the sugars of one form or another." And as he points out, the key word is "refined" because it represents the removal of nutrients required for the metabolism of the contained sugar. Without those nutrients, Dr. Spreen says, "Your body must draw from body stores of nutrients to metabolize the sugar. And draw it will. Once those stores are overtaxed disease sets in, or at least undesirable symptoms that hit wherever your body's weakest link happens to be. This removal of nutrients is the key to our demise, in my opinion. "But, it gets worse. Not only does the refining process remove nutrients, but it also concentrates the sugar within the simple carb food. This causes overstress on the pancreas, the organ responsible for removing sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream and shoving it into muscle cells to be burned as fuel. This overstress manifests as insulin over-secretion, causing (for a while, anyway, until it gives up) low blood sugar swings with a subsequent vicious cycle of blood sugar over-shooting and under-shooting as the body tries to auto-regulate."Ah, but it gets even worse. Another problem in most refining processes of simple carbs is the fact that nearly all fiber is removed. The fiber slows the release of the sugar into the system, easing the signal to the pancreas to release too much insulin too fast." And it's the fiber in fruits - which are unrefined simple carbohydrates - that helps make the sugar in fruit so much healthier than the sugar in refined carbs. That's why, as Dr. Spreen points out, the same healthy benefits are not found in fruit juice, "which is concentrated almost universally, and processed in other ways. It's better to eat your fruit, with clean edible skins. That way you've lowered the amount of sugar taken in, along with the fact that the natural fiber is still on board and the sugars are not as concentrated as they would be otherwise."--------------------------------------------------------------The good and the bad--------------------------------------------------------------As John stated in his e-mail, "complex carbohydrates are good." And generally speaking, there is some truth in that. But Dr. Spreen points out that, 'going complex' may not be all it's cracked up to be. "The basic complex carbs are the edible starches. That's flour, bread, cereals, grains and the like, along with most vegetables. Most of this group makes up the huge 'base' of the so-called Food Pyramid; that moronic image from government bureaucrats, which is in large part responsible for the unimaginable amount of obesity rampant in this country."Starches are simple carb molecules (sugars) that are linked together by special bonds before they can be used by the body as sugar. That can be a good thing, since the enzyme process needed for that breakdown takes time to work, and that delay slows the release of the sugars into our system (the same problem caused by refined simple carbs)."Unfortunately, the same principles apply in the case of refined complex carbs as to the simple ones: the sugars can be concentrated; they can have the necessary nutrients as well as the fiber removed. "As soon as a starch hits enzymes in your mouth, the starches begin the digestion process, and breaks down to (you guessed it) sugar. If those starches start without the nutrients and especially the fiber they originally contained, they are not only inferior foods, but they're also inferior foods with automatically concentrated starches, because the fiber's gone. As soon as the starch breaks down to sugar, you're back to a refined simple carb." --------------------------------------------------------------Hot potato--------------------------------------------------------------Nearly all our starches today are refined. And according to Dr. Spreen, it's extremely difficult (if not impossible) to find 100% unrefined pastas, breads or cereals. Yet we're told that pasta and bagels are excellent "diet foods"! And then there's the baked potato. Writing about this "third food item thrown into the daily 'diet' lunch," Dr. Spreen says, "The baked potato is as close to a pure, refined starch as you can get without actually refining it. I'd tell patients, if they felt obliged to eat a baked potato, to shell out most of it, add some butter, and eat the remainder, including the skin. That's not only where the fiber is, but also where much of the nutrition is, too. "So, be careful when you dig into a load of pasta or bagels. In terms of trying to lose weight, you're literally playing with a 'hot potato'." --------------------------------------------------------------Throwing a block--------------------------------------------------------------You may have heard about "starch blockers" - the weight loss products that promise to stop complex carbs from breaking down so they'll simply pass through your system. These starch blockers do work for some people, but there may be a price to pay. Dr. Spreen explains: "Breaking down starches, as we've said, requires an enzyme in saliva (and other digestive juices). This enzyme can be blocked, using plant-based enzyme blockers. If the starch is not broken down to sugar it becomes like cellulose; it is not metabolized and subsequently passes out of the system. However, you can't be assured that the starch you're blocking is unrefined, and the lack of fiber can be responsible for problems within the bowel other than just caloric absorption. "Again (and again, and again), it's not nice to fool Mother Nature!" And that's true whether you're blocking starches or refining carbohydrates.**************************************************************To start receiving your own copy of the HSI e-Alert, visit:
 

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quote:(in the U.S. at least) MDs have no required training in nutrition whatsoever.
Untrue.
quote:barbaric ---is a very good term for this country's medical system and lack of respect for alternative medeicne.
Thats I characterize alternative med
quote:but totally infested with yeast. E
Most probably a false positive.
quote:stool transit time
How was that done?
quote:Your body must draw from body stores of nutrients to metabolize the sugar. And draw it will.
Untrue.
quote:Not only does the refining process remove nutrients, but it also concentrates the sugar within the simple carb food. This causes overstress on the pancreas,
Refining has nothing to do with this. Its the nature of the sugar. White rice does this, for example.
quote:Nearly all our starches today are refined. And according to Dr. Spreen, it's extremely difficult (if not impossible) to find 100% unrefined pastas, breads or cereals. Yet we're told that pasta and bagels are excellent "diet foods"!
I dont get this. Wheat flour is usually enriched with nutrients.
quote:f the starch is not broken down to sugar it becomes like cellulose;
Also untrue. It gets processed by the bacteria and feeds the colon.
 

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Wildrose--Good post. There was an article in the Toronto Globe and Mail last summer covering current findings in nutrition. Apparently the potato is now listed only as a source of starch, including the skin. You might as well just eat that pat of butter right off of the knife. (Yum)
 

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quote:Good post. There was an article in the Toronto Globe and Mail last summer covering current findings in nutrition
Good? It's mostly wrong.
 
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