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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I just spent a whole night and day in the house, daring not venture far from the bathroom.I am wondering, (and it will have to be a TOTAL last resort), but, could it be possible that smoking has anything to do with ibs?My GP says I get heartburn because smoking has "partially paralysed" some valve that keeps the acid down.I'm smoking - high tar - 20 to 25 a day. It's gonna be THE hardest thing ever to stop, (I started when I was 10, pinching my Dad's), and I'm now 29.Do you reckon smoking can make IBS-D worse? If not, then please say, because I love my ciggies. If so, then say also, then I'll just have to face up to it and stop smoking.Thanks xxx
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hmmmm ... as a pretty heavy smoker myself
I hate to have to tell you this, soshy, but there are many "C" types here who say they can only have a BM with the aid of a cigarette .... therefore I would assume that smoking could have an adverse effect on someone who's mainly D ....Forgive me??Julie
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Aw yes, I forgive you, but I can see me chewing my fingernails right down to the elbows!
 

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soshy, I am also a D type and smoke a pack a day.The few times I've tried to stop. My D would be so bad durring withdrawals that I'd cave after a few days. However, I have a sneaking suspicion that, if I held out through the withdrawals, my IBS/general health would improve over time.Cheers
 

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I've replyed to this question a few times before but heres my 2 cents again.When I was a smoker I said that if I ever quit I wouldn't be one of those ex-smokers who lectured everyone. So no lecture. I smoked for almost 30 years. I've had IBS for almost 30 years. I quit cold turkey a few years ago. Not really because of the IBS but because I have seen two people in my family die of lung cancer. I guess I was shocked into reality. I NEVER thought I could quit. I really loved smoking. I guess I just got to that point in my life where I knew I had to make a decision. Either continuing to enjoy smoking ,which was about the only thing I had left to enjoy or take care of my body so I would be around for my children and family.I can't guarantee that I won't get sick because I quit but I'm no longer willing to help that along. As far as the IBS goes when I was home alone having an atttack the first thing I did was light up. Don't know if it really helped anything. Now whenever I get the urge for that nicotine kick I just wait it out and it passes. Before I couldn't go a day with out thinking about smoking now I only think about it when I see someone else smoking. Still smells good to me and at times I would like a good long drag. But then I think how proud I am of myself for quitting.It really is hard at first but if I can do it anyone can. Hope that didn't sound like a lecture just wanted to let you know that if you REALLY want to do it you can. Good Luck. Lin
 

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Well, soshy, I for one never had a problem with cigs or coffee in regard to D. But my IBS was a by-product of getting my gall bladder yanked, and things have gradually been getting better after a hellish 6 months or so immediately following surgery.And I also enjoy the ciggies.Linr - congratulations for kicking the habit
 

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I was a smoker,m and quit a year and a half ago. I have had IBS-D for many, many years. The syptoms got better after I quit smoking. Don't get me wrong, things didn't clear up, but I was able to have a better life and not be completely chained to the loo. I still have some problems, but they are much more under control then they were when I was smoking. I also gave up caffeine. Here is the reasoning behind my quitting... Caffeine and nicotine are stimulants. They do stimulate your nerve endings, especially those in your gut. And, for those of us with IBS-D, you know that this is what causes the big problems. When your gut is stimulated, you have those uncomfortable cramps, and that need to go to the bathroom. It was hard for me to quit, but I kept thinking about what each of those cigarettes was doing to me. I started smoking light cigarettes, then went to the ultra lights. Eventually, I did quit, and haven't had one since. It IS something you can do, and it WILL be worth it. Good luck...Aimee L.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
soshy,I smoke and I can't say that it really "causes" an IBS-D episode ALL the time, but it certainly does stimulate a gut response more often than not.Interestingly, there was a time when that urge had to be met within seconds of the onset. Then, when I started taking the Caltrate, I could cope with the urge a lot better - meaning that I had a minute or so to get to the toilet, instead of seconds.Now, when I go out into the garage to have a cigarette (my wife and I have agreed not to smoke inside our new house), I can control the urge brought on by taking a drag so that at least I can finish the stick. So, smoking gives me a confirmation that the Caltrate is working. Of course, I don't need to smoke a cigarette just to verify to myself that the Caltrate is working, but it is a curious nuance to me.And, when I've taken an immodium and am done with whatever business I took it for, lighting up a cigarette back at home generally gets me out of that immodium constipation effect.None of this is an argument in favor of smoking - in fact, I am encouraged by all the responses from former smokers here because I'd like to quit myself.Nevertheless, in answer to your question: yes and no. Smoking does, I think, enhance the symptoms of IBS-D, but I don't think quitting will necessarily make those symptoms go away completely. And the amount that those symptoms will be reduced by quitting really depends on how severe your IBS is to begin with.For me, I can smoke and still manage my IBS reasonably. It'd be good to quit though.BJ
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you all very much for your input. I reckon I have alot of thinking to do, and I'll let you know what I decide
 

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Hi all, here's my thought on smoking and IBS.I've had D problems since my late teenage years and I've smoked since those years as well, I'm now 44, last year (end of April 2000) I stopped smoking (was smoking about 25 cigarettes a day) cold turkey, no nicotine at all anymore (my sons hated me and my husband smoking, they are now 13 and almost 15, had to give a good example, and try to be healthier). My D-attacks became more and more regular,from the beginning of June D became daily occurence. I think it's because my whole body-system was shocked, as used and addicted as it was to running on nicotine and all the other chemicals from the cigarettes. I' ve been taking the calcium carbonate for four weeks now and I've only had 1 D-attack so far, so I think Imay have found the solution for the biggest part of my problems on this BB (thanks LNAPE), I have resisted and hope to be able to keep on resisting to start smoking again, because it really is not good for your body. Maybe slowly weaning yourself of the cigarettes would be better if you already have big ISB-problems. However to be really able to stop smoking you have to really want to stop, otherwise the pull is just to big.Hope we'll all find a solution to our IBS-problems (with or without the cigarettes!)Fay
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Soshy,One thing you could do is to try to quit using the nicoderm cq patch. That may help you although I am not sure the nicotine is what could be irritating the D type like I have and yes I smoke too. I have been thinking of quitting again myself just to see if it does help my IBS...Food for thought I guess........ :)
 
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