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I came across a post sometime in the past who was written by a person(s) with a redundant colon and C. I f anyon ereading this has this problem of is familiar with it could you please give me any advice you can to help me. I am very C right now and can't seem to normalize. Fiber supplements seem to make it worse (tired several times). Any advice is helpful. I beleive this is specific C problem (redudent colon) Thanks so much in advance.
 

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While anatomical problems like redundant colon can cause constipation, constipation can be quite severe in people with no anatomical defect.Have you seen a doctor about the constipation? Have you had a barium enema or a colonoscopy, or a abdominal CT scan? Any of those tests would probably turn up abnormal with a redundant colon.FWIW anatomical abnormalities are quite rare in people who suffer from IBS symptoms, although I would suspect that people with anatomical problems would have a higher incidence of IBS symptoms than anatomicall normal people.K.
 

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I have a redundant colon with D-type IBS. (Occasional C.) I actually feel pain when BMs travel through the particularly tight turn where transverse meets descending colon. It also made a colonoscopy (without anesthetic) unbearably painful. I sometimes wonder if overstimulation of the nerves in this area leadd to the pain and urgency of my IBS. I wonder if a resection might cure me entirely. (Not that I could talk any dr. into doing it.)
 

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I couldn't tell from your original post if you had actually been diagnosed, or you just read a post that sounded like your symptoms and assumed that was what it was. That's why I asked.Well if the standard eat more fiber, drink more water, take stool softeners, get more exercise routine doesn't work for you, then it's probably worth discussing surgical options with your doctor to see if fixing the redundancy helps solve the problem.Zelmac when it comes out later this year (assuming all goes well with the approval process) may be a worthwhile drug to try as it should speed up transit, but I doubt it's been tested in anyone with anatomical problems, so it may be a crapshoot trying it for C that is because of the anatomy.K.
 

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Logic says that you should learn more about your problem before trying something like surgery.
quote:Well if the standard eat more fiber, drink more water, take stool softeners, get more exercise routine doesn't work for you
For example, if you had slow-transit constipation, you should consume less fiber, not more.See the original thread at http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/Forum1/HTML/016590.html [This message has been edited by flux (edited 01-19-2001).]
 

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Flux, I am interested in your statement about those of us with redundant colon needing less fiber? That surprises me. My colo-rectal surgeon told me I have about an 8 ft colon but he said he probably wasn't the cause of my constipation and told me to eat more fiber.
 

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I was diagnosed with redundant colon when I had my first scope, back in 94. The doc offered no advice, and it has never been brought up since. I'm C and D. I have so much pain in my left side that I have to sleep with a heating pad every night. I've used the heating pad so much that I have brusing on the left side of my abdomen. My IBS just seems to be getting worse and worse. Fiber does not help at all. I may tell my new doc about the redundant colon and see what her opinion is. I had almost forgotten that I had redundant colon since it was made so light of when it was found. Oh well.......Megan
 

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Flux can you elaborate on your less fiber comment. I've found that taking less fiber has been working well for me, but I though it was just because taking more was producing too much gas.Your link didn't really explain it.Thanks.P.S. What exactly is a redundant colon?[This message has been edited by lk (edited 01-19-2001).]
 

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quote:When your colon is longer than it is supposed to be.
It's also used to refer to colonic inertia, a form of slow-transit constipation.
quote:Rather than being a smooth arc, it curves back on itself, creating kinks rather than smooth bends.
The colon is not a metal pipe, but soft tissue, so a normal colon could do that too. Its general layout (held inside the peritoneum) is subject to one's own anatomy, and it moves to mix and propel things forward. If you jump up and down, so will it.
quote:Flux can you elaborate on your less fiber comment.
This applies to slow-transit constipation, where the gut is not propelling things along properly. Putting in more material (more fiber) just makes that task more difficult.
 

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quote:What is the difference between slow-transit constipation and ordinary constipation?
You'll find no better description than the lecture at www.conference-cast.com/ibs/Lecture/RIDs/RID_BuildLecture.cfm?LectureID=15 Summarized, only some of the people who are referred to evaluation for constipation actually have a quantifiable problem with colonic transit time. Those who don't may either have some other abnormality (such as pelvic floor dysfunction) or IBS (meaning visceral hypersensitivity) or no detectable physical problem. It is also possible to have overlapping problems such as IBS and slow-transit. In addition, slow transit really refers to the whole colonic transit time. It's also possible to have delayed transit in just parts of the colon (right-sided is colonic inertia). Those with a colonic transit time problem can have very severe constipation and are unable to go for long periods of time (maybe twice or even just once a month). When limited to the colon, it has been treated usually sucessfully with removal of the colon.
 

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Hi Saltycat,I had a redundant sigmoid colon which they never saw on barium, xrays, etc.. The only way they found it w surgery and they took it out, the sigmoid. I was great normal Bm no gas bloating or pain for about 8 months after surgery then all of a sudden it just came back, the constipation that is. Before surgery I would go once every month and the only test I had that really showed anything was the Sitz Marker test. What it is is an x-ray test where you take a tylenol looking capsule that has radio-opague rings in it. Five days after you take this you have an abdominal x-ray and they count the remaining rings inside your colon. he capsule contains 24 rings and by day 5 you should have eliminated 80% of them. I did this at the first year my problem started and then again 4 years later and I expelled about 40% each time and they were alway in my sigmoid colon. So we figured take out the sigmiod and I should be good to go and was for 8 months and now I'm right back to where I started. I will say I do not get as bloated and I definately do not have pain maybe once every other month but the constipation is still the same. Son't know if this helps you at all but if you have any other questions feel free to email me anytime.Alison
 
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