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I've been reading this board for a couple of months now. There is alot of talk about antidepressants. I've had ibs D for 20 yrs. I could usually deal. This year has been the worst . I don't do much socalizing anymore, I'm afraid of having an attack. I had a physical a couple weeks ago. The Doc asked if I had any concerns. I said I have a rapid pulse(witch I thought was from diareha panic) and I would like to try an antidepressant to see if it could help me be more like the old me. He put me on a Rx. Forgot the name started with a C. This was a friday. Then on Monday night he calls me and says my bloodwork is back and I have hyperthyroidism. He says to go off the Rx. because it's not the one of choice for my rapid pulse. He put me on a beta blocker. I have tests sched. in Jan. But the Doc thinks my anxiety could be from the thyroid. I think it's a combo platter. All you guys with ibs D know the anxiety I'm talking about. Do I push for a new Rx. or do the thyroid stuff first which could take months??? I want to be able to relax and enjoy!
 

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Hi, your story sounds exactly like mine....IBS D for as long as I can remember, anxiety, panic attacks, rapid pulse, hair falling out, irritability, sweaty palms, emotional outbursts, hot flashes...I could have written your story myself. I too was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism...mine is from Graves disease which is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism, but it can be caused by other things such as a hyperfunctioning nodule on your thyroid.The beta blocker should help you with the rapid pulse and the anxiety (it's often prescribed for stage fright). I highly recommend that you read up on hyperthyroidism and learn as much as you can about it prior to your January appointment. There are basically 3 treatment options...none of the treatment options are quick, or magic cures. It will take patience on your part to get well. When I was first diagnosed in 1999 someone gave me this analogy and I think it's a good one....being hyperthyroid is like a hurricaine hitting a town...once the winds and rain calm down the town is still in rubble and it takes time to rebuild....it's much the same with hyperthyroidism...it will take time for your body to heal from the onslaught of too much thyroid hormone. Getting diagnosed is one of the MAJOR hurdles, and you're already over that one. There are some good websites out there that can help you educate yourself on hyperthyroidism. I highly recommend www.suite101.com - search for articles by Elaine Moore. She is a Graves patient and has just published a book on Graves and hyperthyroidism. She also drops by the Mediboard bb that I moderate on Graves and Thyroid disorders to answer questions.There's so much I would like to tell you about hyperthyroidism, but I don't want to confuse you. Feel free to drop by the Mediboard bb and ask any questions you may have. The wisest advice I can give you is to thoroughly investigate the treatment options...some of the options are permanent, such as radioactive iodine that permanently damages your thyroid gland...others, like the one I chose (anti-thyroid medication) can be stopped at any time. I know that you will feel *SO* much better once your thyroid levels have stabilized. Good luck!
 

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Hi, your story sounds exactly like mine....IBS D for as long as I can remember, anxiety, panic attacks, rapid pulse, hair falling out, irritability, sweaty palms, emotional outbursts, hot flashes...I could have written your story myself. I too was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism...mine is from Graves disease which is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism, but it can be caused by other things such as a hyperfunctioning nodule on your thyroid.The beta blocker should help you with the rapid pulse and the anxiety (it's often prescribed for stage fright). I highly recommend that you read up on hyperthyroidism and learn as much as you can about it prior to your January appointment. There are basically 3 treatment options...none of the treatment options are quick, or magic cures. It will take patience on your part to get well. When I was first diagnosed in 1999 someone gave me this analogy and I think it's a good one....being hyperthyroid is like a hurricaine hitting a town...once the winds and rain calm down the town is still in rubble and it takes time to rebuild....it's much the same with hyperthyroidism...it will take time for your body to heal from the onslaught of too much thyroid hormone. Getting diagnosed is one of the MAJOR hurdles, and you're already over that one. There are some good websites out there that can help you educate yourself on hyperthyroidism. I highly recommend www.suite101.com - search for articles by Elaine Moore. She is a Graves patient and has just published a book on Graves and hyperthyroidism. She also drops by the Mediboard bb that I moderate on Graves and Thyroid disorders to answer questions.There's so much I would like to tell you about hyperthyroidism, but I don't want to confuse you. Feel free to drop by the Mediboard bb and ask any questions you may have. The wisest advice I can give you is to thoroughly investigate the treatment options...some of the options are permanent, such as radioactive iodine that permanently damages your thyroid gland...others, like the one I chose (anti-thyroid medication) can be stopped at any time. I know that you will feel *SO* much better once your thyroid levels have stabilized. Good luck!
 

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I take 45 mgs of Remeron. It is a seratonin blocker (5ht3 receptor, like Lotronex). I have IBS D. It works extremely well for me. You can ask him if that is safe until you get all these test done for your thyriod. It is non-addictive.
 

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I take 45 mgs of Remeron. It is a seratonin blocker (5ht3 receptor, like Lotronex). I have IBS D. It works extremely well for me. You can ask him if that is safe until you get all these test done for your thyriod. It is non-addictive.
 

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Your Dr is right to rule out physical causes for your anxiety, like hyperthyrodism, prior to starting you on anti-depressants. Firstly, when your hyperthyroidism is treated, your anxiety may be greatly reduced or even gone. Secondly, SSRI's have their own side-effects, so it would be bad practice for your Dr to give you an SSRI while you have untreated hyperthyroidism. Finally, SSRI's do treat anxiety, but paradoxically they can also cause anxiety, agitation and insomnia in some people. So you may be more prone to this, given your hyperthyroidism. Maybe a different anti-depressant would be better suited to you, if you still need one (if the beta-blocker doesn't help)Sounds to me like you have a good Dr!
 

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Your Dr is right to rule out physical causes for your anxiety, like hyperthyrodism, prior to starting you on anti-depressants. Firstly, when your hyperthyroidism is treated, your anxiety may be greatly reduced or even gone. Secondly, SSRI's have their own side-effects, so it would be bad practice for your Dr to give you an SSRI while you have untreated hyperthyroidism. Finally, SSRI's do treat anxiety, but paradoxically they can also cause anxiety, agitation and insomnia in some people. So you may be more prone to this, given your hyperthyroidism. Maybe a different anti-depressant would be better suited to you, if you still need one (if the beta-blocker doesn't help)Sounds to me like you have a good Dr!
 
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