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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have recently started on Lotronex and I swear I feel a little spaced out (yes, more than my usual) Does this drug ONLY effect the intestine??? Seritonin is an important neurotransmitter and how they can get this drug to work on my gut only concerns me. Yes, I am a little paranoid about taking any medication..... Anyone have any experience with this???? Thanks....Beth
 

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I'm not sure if I have seen any data on how it distributes in the body, but many drugs do not enter the brain because of the blood-brain barrier. Some, like Imodium, have a very hard time getting out of the gut, so it is possible to make something fairly gut specific.I'll see if I can find anything, but the doses used for it (whcih do not always mean that much ) are much lower than what you usually see for serotonin drugs that need to get into the brain to work. For some of those you have to take a lot to get enough into the brain to work.K.
 

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PubMed abstract Seems to indicate the notice things going on in the brains of people that take Lotronex, but I do not know if these are things that cause side effects. I also do not know if these are direct effects of Lotronex in the brain, or just reactions to what is going on in the Enteric Nervous system and how it interacts with the brain (gut nerves).I'm gonna check the side effects profile to see how common/rare Central Nervous System effects are. Usually the only major CNS effects are with overdose, not things you see in people taking the usual dose. However some people can be more sensitive to some drugs (and some people who get worried can experience side effects that aren't caused by the drug but by the anxiety, etc) If it is bothersome it may be worth talking it over with the doctor to see if this medication is right for you, or if you might be someone who would do better on a reduced dosage. Sometimes the dose recommended is too strong for some people, and they may need a lower dose than others.K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks so much, it sounds like there is probably that brain-gut connection. If the response in this randonized study shows slower stimulus, it almost stands to reason that there could be an over-all affect. I am usually severely sensitive to most medications so I also deal with the anxiety factor and I know it. Emotions play such an integral role in our health. Thanks for all your input, I appreciate it.
 

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FYI"BETHESDA, MARYLAND September 30, 2002 - The October issue of the journal Gastroenterology includes two studies focusing on how drugs affect the central nervous system�s control of the gut.""Lotronex May Improve IBS by Attenuating Activity in Brain Regions Responsible for EmotionResearchers studying this drug to treat IBS found that it acts in part on the portion of the brain responsible for control of the gut and expression of emotion in the body. These findings substantiate the previously unconfirmed belief of a mind-gut connection in IBS.In the study, 49 non-constipated IBS patients received brain scans before a randomized, placebo-controlled three-week trial with Lotronex. Patients were given rectal and sigmoid distensions, a procedure that inflates the rectum and sigmoid colon with a computer-controlled barostat device. Brain scans assessed patients� blood flow to the limbic emotional motor system and the pain processing regions of the brain before and during distension.Compared to placebo, Lotronex improved IBS symptoms and reduced blood flow in areas of the brain�s emotional motor system, but not in areas previously reported as being activated by pain. Reduction in blood flow to the emotional motor system was greatest when patients were in a resting state, anticipating distension, and was partially reversed during the actual distension."These findings suggest that Lotronex, in addition to its documented peripheral effect on the enteric nervous system in the gut, may act in part by regulating activity in limbic brain regions, which may be overactive in many patients with IBS," said Emeran A. Mayer, MD, professor of medicine and physiology, UCLA School of Medicine." http://www.gastro.org/public/media/newsrel.../ibs-Oct02.html
 
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