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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had various tests ran and celiac being one of them. One of my blood tests showed a possible wheat allergy so I had the biospies done and it came back negative for celiac but it showed I have shortened Villi (don't know if spelling is right) My doc which is my 3rd gastro doc said its nothing to be concerend with but what would cause this?? My niece also has shortened villi and was told that it was from celiac and if she continued to eat wheat/gluten it would eventually really mess up her system. She also is lactose and fructose intolerant. I am just wondering if this isn't something I should be concerened with. My doc has ibs-d also like me but when he said it was nothing to worry about I was a little taken back by it. Anyone have this same issue???
 

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May depend how shortened and what it looks like.No person is perfectly anatomically normal in all ways. Everything has a normal range (where 95% of totally healthy people are) and often the "clinically significant" range is a bit away from the "statistically normal 95% of healthy people" range.Going to pick some random numbers here just for explanation sake.So 10-15 (pick a unit) could be "statistically normal" And that normal range is from measuring a bunch of people, find the average and standard deviation and it is the average +/- 2 standard deviations to include 95% or so of all healthy people. There will always for every measurement be heathly people outside the normal range.Lets say they don't ever see any symptoms unless people are under 7 units. So you could be at 8 or 9 and have meaningless but abnormal result.I'm not having much luck finding out what the actual numbers and ranges are, but usually the reason a doctor isn't going into "lets do something about this immediately" mode is because you are in the normally-abnormal range on something. The "sub clinical" range is usually the technical term for it.I know having any number or anatomy that isn't in the "normal range" can be scary, but sooner or later you will be in the 5% who aren't in the stasticially normal range for something and unless that number is in the clinically significant range the doctor isn't going to do anything about it.Do you have any symptoms at all of an inability to absorb food.AnemiaLow bone densityCan't maintain your weight no matter how much you eat and everyone is jealous because you eat thirds at every meal and still make runway models look fat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As far as my last test I am not anemic..I have no idea about the bone density, never had a test done for it. So it could be thats just how my body is and its normal for me. Makes sense.
 

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I was in a clinical study (an easy one, just a blood draw and the look at stuff) awhile ago. In addition to the things they looked for specifically for the study they did a full range of blood tests and would send you results if anything was wonky.My long term blood sugar average test was abnormal, but abnormal on the low side, but in the "sub clinical" range and generally it is better to run on the low side as running on the high side can mean you are heading into diabetes. I think you can be so low it is a concern, but just a tad lower than the arbitrary line they use to draw the range is nothing any doctor would be worried about.But since it wasn't statistically in the normal range they had to send the results to me.
 
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